Archive for August, 2011

Radio Sweet FM

August 25th, 2011

A few nice FM Radio images I found:

Radio Sweet FM
FM Radio
Image by verni22im
Visite spontanée du studio radio, en pleine émission!

Deux semaines de formation pour des journalistes radio camerounais sur le thème" comment couvrir les élections présidentielles d’octobre 2011?"
Plus de photos de photos sur la formation sur le compte FlickR de la "Deutsche Welle Akademie Africa":
www.flickr.com/photos/dw-akademie-africa/sets/72157627159…

FM Radio on an HTC Desire
FM Radio
Image by adambowie

Radio Sweet FM
FM Radio
Image by verni22im
en route: trois devant et trois derrière !

Deux semaines de formation pour des journalistes radio camerounais sur le thème" comment couvrir les élections présidentielles d’octobre 2011?"
Plus de photos de photos sur la formation sur le compte FlickR de la "Deutsche Welle Akademie Africa":
www.flickr.com/photos/dw-akademie-africa/sets/72157627159…

Radio | Posted by admin

Nice Washington Concert photos

August 25th, 2011

A few nice washington concert images I found:

Lincoln Memorial pre-inauguration concert
washington concert
Image by benab

Lincoln Memorial pre-inauguration concert
washington concert
Image by benab

Lincoln Memorial pre-inauguration concert
washington concert
Image by benab

Music | Posted by admin

What radio station will be broadcasting the Eagles game in Washington DC this Sunday?

August 25th, 2011

Question by Linda W: What radio station will be broadcasting the Eagles game in Washington DC this Sunday?

Best answer:

Answer by Viktor Y
WTEM 980 AM

Add your own answer in the comments!

Radio | Posted by admin

When is Obama going to arrest the people responsible for the recession?

August 25th, 2011

Question by James: When is Obama going to arrest the people responsible for the recession?
During his campaign, Obama said he would investitage and arrest those responsible for the wreckless behavior that lead to the recession. When was this done? Who was arrested? Was this done before or after Obama closed down gitmo?

Best answer:

Answer by Shephard
Why would he want to arrest himself? After all, he made the recession WORSE through his porked out stimulus bills.

Give your answer to this question below!

Washington | Posted by admin

Can anyone help me find a way to sponsor my music trip to Europe?

August 24th, 2011

Question by simplymayowa: Can anyone help me find a way to sponsor my music trip to Europe?
In the summer of 2010 I am scheduled to travel to Europe with the Washington Ambassadors of Music, however the cost is a little too much for my family to handle. This trip is incredibly important to me not only because I will be able to play music in other countries but also because I will be able to experience other cultures which is an opportunity that is too valuable to pass up. If anyone could help me find a sponsor for this trip or give me ideas on how to make some money it would take an enormous amount of stress off of my family and I would be very grateful.

Best answer:

Answer by mary
Why don’t you organise a concert? you could play your music and ask some of your musician friends to play for free. Charge an entry fee.

Give your answer to this question below!

Music | Posted by admin

Business Opportunities in Online Music Industry

August 24th, 2011

Business Opportunities in Online Music Industry

<p align=”center”>Business  Opportunities in Online Music Industry</p>
<p>Internet is amazing huge thing of  daily life. It creates and redefines new business landscapes on it.<br />
It redefines new ways of business  and revenue models for traditional business.<br />
There are new vistas opening  every day due to internet exponential growth, now propelled by mobile industry.  The mobiles are now biggest penetrators in our homes after radios.</p>
<p>Here are three new options  available for people who want to pursue music as online business model:</p>
<ol type=”a”>
<li>Online  Music Store: Be special in finding right instrument and right books on songs  and lyrics sell able through a online website. If you can take care of content  copyrights issues your site will flourish to bring stream of new revenue.  Distributing and selling Ring Tones is a new way to make money.</li>

]]>

<li>Online  Radio Channel: These days most of the governments are allowing setting up of  new radio stations working as FMs, and if simply you do not want to get into  the license issues huge payments you can go for online radio. <br/><br/>On line radio is  easy to open and easy to operate. You can reach millions if you know really how  to promote your radio channel and offer alternative model of advertisement for  companies.</li><br/>
<li>Online  Voice Modulator: Many content productions houses are doing projects and need  good number of people for developing global content. Therefore, they need  people who can lend their voice for content which is neutral in ascent or may  do it in some other language.</li>
</ol>

You no longer need to physically travel to lead  your voice, lot of music, voice production work can now be done by online tools  .One can record and send voice file simply through email or use some real time  web based application to voice recorded in real time to some remote music  production house.
<p>&nbsp;</p>

<p>Puneet Arora is associated with <a rel=”nofollow” onclick=”javascript:_gaq.push([‘_trackPageview’, ‘/outgoing/article_exit_link/3580957’]);” href=”http://tamilmp3songslyrics.com/” title=”tamilmp3songslyrics”><b>Tamilmp3songslyrics</b></a> and <a rel=”nofollow” onclick=”javascript:_gaq.push([‘_trackPageview’, ‘/outgoing/article_exit_link/3580957’]);” href=”http://hindimp3songlyrics.com/” title=”hindimp3song”><b>Hindimp3songlyrics</b></a>  web portal since the inception of these Web portal . He is a great tamil music lover and admirer of tamil poetry and cinema .</p>

Article from articlesbase.com

Noel Gallagher performs “Listen Up” live at the Royal Albert Hall accompanied by The Crouch End Festival Chorus and Wired Strings. 26th March 2010 Teenage Cancer Trust. Audio courtesy of Absolute Radio online. Photos courtesy of BBC News and News of the World. Many thanks to Jono as well for the recording.

Find More Online Radio Articles

Radio | Posted by admin

Q&A: Does anyone think that WHAD 90.7 FM Milwaukee will consider a 24 hour classical format?

August 24th, 2011

Question by confidential0908: Does anyone think that WHAD 90.7 FM Milwaukee will consider a 24 hour classical format?
After WFMR dumping classical for smooth jazz it would be nice if WHAD would consider offering Milwaukee residents a non-commercial classical FM station. In Washington,DC a pulbic radio staion became a 24 hour calssical station after WGMS dropped classical.

Best answer:

Answer by LC
I don’t thnk that WHAD wants to risk it’s listenership (if that’s a word) on such a big change. I’d go for a good sized block of classical music offered every day, or maybe two of them, one day-timed, one night-timed. I think they’d have a solid number of listeners for that and it would be a good situation all-round. It’s sad to lose WFMR to that slickery smooth jazz stuff, though. The world doesn’t seem right without WFMR playing classical music.
I suspect smooth jazz is really played by space aliens who are trying to deaden earthlings’ minds so that they can take over the planet. Resist, I beg you.

Give your answer to this question below!

Washington | Posted by admin

Q&A: Why does washington produce so much good music?

August 24th, 2011

Question by smells like teen spirit!: Why does washington produce so much good music?
Modest mouse
death cab for cutie
jimmy hendrix
nirvana
Quincy Jones
soung garden
the melvins
mudhoney
bikini kill
alice n chains
green river
foo fighters

and many more!

Best answer:

Answer by max
only recognized 5 of those and only 2, maybe 3 are good.

Add your own answer in the comments!

Music | Posted by admin

Cool Online Radio images

August 24th, 2011

Some cool Online Radio images:

Laid Back stickers
Online Radio
Image by Julius – Laid Back
Promo stickers for Laid Back: online media mixing radio and magazine.

Stickers by Ali Nassiri – Logo by Laure C.

Laid Back stickers
Online Radio
Image by Julius – Laid Back
Promo stickers for Laid Back: online media mixing radio and magazine.

Stickers by Ali Nassiri – Logo by Laure C.

Radio | Posted by admin

Convert to LVM for the rootvg on local drive

August 24th, 2011

Convert to LVM for the rootvg on local drive

Convert to LVM for the rootvg on local drive

 

Check the current setup

 

[root@lab1 ~]# df -h

Filesystem            Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on

/dev/cciss/c0d0p1      18G  2.9G   14G  18% /

tmpfs                1005M     0 1005M   0% /dev/shm

 

[root@lab1 ~]# fdisk -l /dev/cciss/c0d0

 

Disk /dev/cciss/c0d0: 73.3 GB, 73372631040 bytes

255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 8920 cylinders

Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

 

           Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System

/dev/cciss/c0d0p1   *           1        2350    18876343+  83  Linux

/dev/cciss/c0d0p2            2351        3394     8385930   82  Linux swap / Solaris

 

Remove the current swap space to make room for a temporary root partition

 

[root@lab1 ~]# swapoff -a -v

[root@lab1 ~]# fdisk /dev/cciss/c0d0

 

The number of cylinders for this disk is set to 8920.

There is nothing wrong with that, but this is larger than 1024,

and could in certain setups cause problems with:

1) software that runs at boot time (e.g., old versions of LILO)

2) booting and partitioning software from other OSs

   (e.g., DOS FDISK, OS/2 FDISK)

 

Command (m for help): d

Partition number (1-4): 2

 

Command (m for help): p

 

Disk /dev/cciss/c0d0: 73.3 GB, 73372631040 bytes

255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 8920 cylinders

Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

 

           Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System

/dev/cciss/c0d0p1   *           1        2350    18876343+  83  Linux

 

Command (m for help): w

The partition table has been altered!

 

Calling ioctl() to re-read partition table.

 

WARNING: Re-reading the partition table failed with error 16: Device or resource busy.

The kernel still uses the old table.

The new table will be used at the next reboot.

Syncing disks.

[root@lab1 ~]# partprobe

 

Make sure to leave enough room, so that you can create /boot partition on slice 1, since /boot can not be under LVM support.

 

[root@lab1 ~]# fdisk /dev/cciss/c0d0

Command (m for help): p

 

Disk /dev/cciss/c0d0: 73.3 GB, 73372631040 bytes

255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 8920 cylinders

Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

 

           Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System

/dev/cciss/c0d0p1   *           1        2350    18876343+  83  Linux

 

Command (m for help): n

Command action

   e   extended

   p   primary partition (1-4)

p

Partition number (1-4): 3

First cylinder (2351-8920, default 2351): 2371

Last cylinder or +size or +sizeM or +sizeK (2371-8920, default 8920): 4721

 

Command (m for help): w

The partition table has been altered!

 

Calling ioctl() to re-read partition table.

 

WARNING: Re-reading the partition table failed with error 16: Device or resource busy.

The kernel still uses the old table.

The new table will be used at the next reboot.

Syncing disks.

[root@lab1 ~]# partprobe

 

Create a filesystem on the new slice, and copy the contents of slice 1 over.

 

[root@lab1 ~]# mke2fs -j /dev/cciss/c0d0p3

mke2fs 1.39 (29-May-2006)

Filesystem label=

OS type: Linux

Block size=4096 (log=2)

Fragment size=4096 (log=2)

2361760 inodes, 4721101 blocks

236055 blocks (5.00%) reserved for the super user

First data block=0

Maximum filesystem blocks=4294967296

145 block groups

32768 blocks per group, 32768 fragments per group

16288 inodes per group

Superblock backups stored on blocks:

       32768, 98304, 163840, 229376, 294912, 819200, 884736, 1605632, 2654208,

       4096000

 

Writing inode tables: done                           

Creating journal (32768 blocks): done

Writing superblocks and filesystem accounting information: done

 

This filesystem will be automatically checked every 37 mounts or

180 days, whichever comes first.  Use tune2fs -c or -i to override.

[root@lab1 ~]# mount -t ext3 /dev/cciss/c0d0p3 /mnt

[root@lab1 ~]# cd /

[root@lab1 /]# find / -xdev|cpio -pvmd /mnt

 

Make the new partition bootable.

 

[root@lab1 /]# fdisk /dev/cciss/c0d0

 

The number of cylinders for this disk is set to 8920.

There is nothing wrong with that, but this is larger than 1024,

and could in certain setups cause problems with:

1) software that runs at boot time (e.g., old versions of LILO)

2) booting and partitioning software from other OSs

   (e.g., DOS FDISK, OS/2 FDISK)

 

Command (m for help): p

 

Disk /dev/cciss/c0d0: 73.3 GB, 73372631040 bytes

255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 8920 cylinders

Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

 

           Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System

/dev/cciss/c0d0p1   *           1        2350    18876343+  83  Linux

/dev/cciss/c0d0p3            2371        4721    18884407+  83  Linux

 

Command (m for help): a

Partition number (1-4): 3

 

Command (m for help): a

Partition number (1-4): 1

 

Command (m for help): p

 

Disk /dev/cciss/c0d0: 73.3 GB, 73372631040 bytes

255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 8920 cylinders

Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

 

           Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System

/dev/cciss/c0d0p1               1        2350    18876343+  83  Linux

/dev/cciss/c0d0p3   *        2371        4721    18884407+  83  Linux

 

Command (m for help): w

The partition table has been altered!

 

Calling ioctl() to re-read partition table.

 

WARNING: Re-reading the partition table failed with error 16: Device or resource busy.

The kernel still uses the old table.

The new table will be used at the next reboot.

Syncing disks.

[root@lab1 /]# partprobe

 

Edit the /mnt/etc/fstab file to point to the new partition.

 

[root@lab1 /]# vi /mnt/etc/fstab

[root@lab1 /]# cat /mnt/etc/fstab

/dev/cciss/c0d0p3    /                       ext3    defaults        1 1

tmpfs                   /dev/shm                tmpfs   defaults        0 0

devpts                  /dev/pts                devpts  gid=5,mode=620  0 0

sysfs                   /sys                    sysfs   defaults        0 0

proc                    /proc                   proc    defaults        0 0

[root@lab1 /]#

 

Edit the /mnt/boot/grub/grub.conf and /boot/grub/grub.conf file to point to the new partition also.

 

[root@lab1 /]# vi /mnt/boot/grub/grub.conf

[root@lab1 /]# cat /mnt/boot/grub/grub.conf

# grub.conf generated by anaconda

#

# Note that you do not have to rerun grub after making changes to this file

# NOTICE:  You do not have a /boot partition.  This means that

#          all kernel and initrd paths are relative to /, eg.

#          root (hd0,0)

#          kernel /boot/vmlinuz-version ro root=/dev/cciss/c0d0p1

#          initrd /boot/initrd-version.img

#boot=/dev/cciss/c0d0

default=0

timeout=5

splashimage=(hd0,0)/boot/grub/splash.xpm.gz

hiddenmenu

title Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server (2.6.18-92.el5)

       root (hd0,0)

       kernel /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.18-92.el5 ro root=/dev/cciss/c0d0p3 pci=nommconf rhgb quiet

       initrd /boot/initrd-2.6.18-92.el5.img

 [root@lab1 /]# vi /boot/grub/grub.conf

[root@lab1 /]# cat /boot/grub/grub.conf

# grub.conf generated by anaconda

#

# Note that you do not have to rerun grub after making changes to this file

# NOTICE:  You do not have a /boot partition.  This means that

#          all kernel and initrd paths are relative to /, eg.

#          root (hd0,0)

#          kernel /boot/vmlinuz-version ro root=/dev/cciss/c0d0p1

#          initrd /boot/initrd-version.img

#boot=/dev/cciss/c0d0

default=0

timeout=5

splashimage=(hd0,0)/boot/grub/splash.xpm.gz

hiddenmenu

title Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server (2.6.18-92.el5)

       root (hd0,0)

       kernel /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.18-92.el5 ro root=/dev/cciss/c0d0p3 pci=nommconf rhgb quiet

       initrd /boot/initrd-2.6.18-92.el5.img

 

Reboot the server, and it should come up on the new partition.

 

[root@lab1 ~]# df -k

Filesystem           1K-blocks      Used Available Use% Mounted on

/dev/cciss/c0d0p3     18587892   2984316  14659356  17% /

tmpfs                  1029044         0   1029044   0% /dev/shm

 

Remove slice 1 and create a /boot partition on slice 1, and the new root partition on slice 2.

 

[root@lab1 ~]# fdisk /dev/cciss/c0d0

Command (m for help): p

 

Disk /dev/cciss/c0d0: 73.3 GB, 73372631040 bytes

255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 8920 cylinders

Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

 

           Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System

/dev/cciss/c0d0p1               1        2350    18876343+  83  Linux

/dev/cciss/c0d0p3   *        2371        4721    18884407+  83  Linux

 

Command (m for help): d

Partition number (1-4): 1

 

Command (m for help): w

The partition table has been altered!

 

Calling ioctl() to re-read partition table.

 

WARNING: Re-reading the partition table failed with error 16: Device or resource busy.

The kernel still uses the old table.

The new table will be used at the next reboot.

 

[root@lab1 ~]# fdisk /dev/cciss/c0d0

 

The number of cylinders for this disk is set to 8920.

There is nothing wrong with that, but this is larger than 1024,

and could in certain setups cause problems with:

1) software that runs at boot time (e.g., old versions of LILO)

2) booting and partitioning software from other OSs

   (e.g., DOS FDISK, OS/2 FDISK)

 

Command (m for help): p

 

Disk /dev/cciss/c0d0: 73.3 GB, 73372631040 bytes

255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 8920 cylinders

Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

 

           Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System

/dev/cciss/c0d0p3   *        2371        4721    18884407+  83  Linux

 

Command (m for help): n

Command action

   e   extended

   p   primary partition (1-4)

]]>

p

Partition number (1-4): 1

First cylinder (1-8920, default 1):

Using default value 1

Last cylinder or +size or +sizeM or +sizeK (1-2370, default 2370): 20

 

Command (m for help): p

 

Disk /dev/cciss/c0d0: 73.3 GB, 73372631040 bytes

255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 8920 cylinders

Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

 

           Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System

/dev/cciss/c0d0p1               1          20      160618+  83  Linux

/dev/cciss/c0d0p3   *        2371        4721    18884407+  83  Linux

 

Command (m for help): n

Command action

   e   extended

   p   primary partition (1-4)

p

Partition number (1-4): 2

First cylinder (21-8920, default 21): 21

Last cylinder or +size or +sizeM or +sizeK (21-2370, default 2370): 2370

 

Command (m for help): p

 

Disk /dev/cciss/c0d0: 73.3 GB, 73372631040 bytes

255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 8920 cylinders

Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

 

           Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System

/dev/cciss/c0d0p1               1          20      160618+  83  Linux

/dev/cciss/c0d0p2              21        2370    18876375   83  Linux

/dev/cciss/c0d0p3   *        2371        4721    18884407+  83  Linux

 

Command (m for help): w

The partition table has been altered!

 

Calling ioctl() to re-read partition table.

 

WARNING: Re-reading the partition table failed with error 16: Device or resource busy.

The kernel still uses the old table.

The new table will be used at the next reboot.

Syncing disks.

[root@lab1 ~]# partprobe

 

10. Change the partition type of 2 to LVM (8e) and make the partition 1 bootable.

 

[root@lab1 ~]# fdisk /dev/cciss/c0d0

 

The number of cylinders for this disk is set to 8920.

There is nothing wrong with that, but this is larger than 1024,

and could in certain setups cause problems with:

1) software that runs at boot time (e.g., old versions of LILO)

2) booting and partitioning software from other OSs

   (e.g., DOS FDISK, OS/2 FDISK)

 

Command (m for help): p

 

Disk /dev/cciss/c0d0: 73.3 GB, 73372631040 bytes

255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 8920 cylinders

Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

 

           Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System

/dev/cciss/c0d0p1               1          20      160618+  83  Linux

/dev/cciss/c0d0p2              21        2370    18876375   83  Linux

/dev/cciss/c0d0p3   *        2371        4721    18884407+  83  Linux

 

Command (m for help): t

Partition number (1-4): 2

Hex code (type L to list codes): 8e

Changed system type of partition 2 to 8e (Linux LVM)

 

Command (m for help): a

Partition number (1-4): 1

 

Command (m for help): a

Partition number (1-4): 3

 

Command (m for help): p

 

Disk /dev/cciss/c0d0: 73.3 GB, 73372631040 bytes

255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 8920 cylinders

Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

 

           Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System

/dev/cciss/c0d0p1   *           1          20      160618+  83  Linux

/dev/cciss/c0d0p2              21        2370    18876375   8e  Linux LVM

/dev/cciss/c0d0p3            2371        4721    18884407+  83  Linux

 

Command (m for help): w

The partition table has been altered!

 

Calling ioctl() to re-read partition table.

 

WARNING: Re-reading the partition table failed with error 16: Device or resource busy.

The kernel still uses the old table.

The new table will be used at the next reboot.

Syncing disks.

[root@lab1 ~]# partprobe

 

11. tar the contents of the original /boot dir.

 

 [root@lab1 /]# cd /boot

[root@lab1 boot]# tar -cvf /tmp/boot.tar *

config-2.6.18-92.el5

grub/

grub/stage2

grub/fat_stage1_5

grub/ufs2_stage1_5

grub/ffs_stage1_5

grub/menu.lst

grub/jfs_stage1_5

grub/splash.xpm.gz

grub/xfs_stage1_5

grub/reiserfs_stage1_5

grub/grub.conf

grub/stage1

grub/iso9660_stage1_5

grub/device.map

grub/e2fs_stage1_5

grub/minix_stage1_5

grub/vstafs_stage1_5

initrd-2.6.18-92.el5.img

initrd-2.6.18-92.el5.img.orig

symvers-2.6.18-92.el5.gz

System.map-2.6.18-92.el5

vmlinuz-2.6.18-92.el5

 

12. Create a new filesystem on slice 1 , the new boot partition.

 

[root@lab1 /]# mke2fs -j/dev/cciss/c0d0p1

mke2fs 1.39 (29-May-2006)

Filesystem label=

OS type: Linux

Block size=4096 (log=2)

Fragment size=4096 (log=2)

2361760 inodes, 4721101 blocks

236055 blocks (5.00%) reserved for the super user

First data block=0

Maximum filesystem blocks=4294967296

145 block groups

32768 blocks per group, 32768 fragments per group

16288 inodes per group

Superblock backups stored on blocks:

       32768, 98304, 163840, 229376, 294912, 819200, 884736, 1605632, 2654208,

       4096000

 

Writing inode tables: done                           

Creating journal (32768 blocks): done

Writing superblocks and filesystem accounting information: done

 

This filesystem will be automatically checked every 37 mounts or

180 days, whichever comes first.  Use tune2fs -c or -i to override.

 

 

13. Delete everything in the original /boot filesystem on the temporary partition.

 

[root@lab1 mnt]# cd /boot

[root@lab1 boot]# ls

config-2.6.18-92.el5  initrd-2.6.18-92.el5.img       symvers-2.6.18-92.el5.gz  vmlinuz-2.6.18-92.el5

grub                  initrd-2.6.18-92.el5.img.orig  System.map-2.6.18-92.el5

[root@lab1 boot]# rm -f -r *

 

14. Mount slice 1 onto /boot and untar the contents.

 

 [root@lab1 /]# mount -t ext3 /dev/cciss/c0d0p1 /boot

[root@lab1 /]# cd /boot

[root@lab1 boot]# tar -xvf /tmp/boot.tar

config-2.6.18-92.el5

grub/

grub/minix_stage1_5

grub/jfs_stage1_5

grub/device.map

grub/splash.xpm.gz

grub/fat_stage1_5

grub/e2fs_stage1_5

grub/ffs_stage1_5

grub/xfs_stage1_5

grub/ufs2_stage1_5

grub/iso9660_stage1_5

grub/vstafs_stage1_5

grub/stage1

grub/grub.conf

grub/reiserfs_stage1_5

grub/menu.lst

grub/stage2

initrd-2.6.18-92.el5.img

initrd-2.6.18-92.el5.img.orig

symvers-2.6.18-92.el5.gz

System.map-2.6.18-92.el5

vmlinuz-2.6.18-92.el5

[root@lab1 boot]# pwd

/boot

[root@lab1 boot]# ls

config-2.6.18-92.el5  initrd-2.6.18-92.el5.img       lost+found                   System.map-2.6.18-92.el5

grub                initrd-2.6.18-92.el5.img.orig  symvers-2.6.18-92.el5.gz  vmlinuz-2.6.18-92.el5

 

15. Change /etc/fstab to point to the new /boot partition.

 

[root@lab1 boot]# vi /etc/fstab

[root@lab1 boot]# cat /etc/fstab

/dev/cciss/c0d0p3    /                       ext3    defaults        1 1

/dev/cciss/c0d0p1    /boot                ext3   defaults      1 2

tmpfs                   /dev/shm                tmpfs   defaults        0 0

devpts                  /dev/pts                devpts  gid=5,mode=620  0 0

sysfs                   /sys                    sysfs   defaults        0 0

proc                    /proc                   proc    defaults        0 0

 

16. Recreate the intitrd image.

 

[root@lab1 ~]# mkinitrd -f /boot/initrd-2.6.18-92.el5.img `uname -r`

 

17. Create a new MBR for the new /boot partition.

 

[root@lab1 /]# grub-install /dev/cciss/c0d0

Installation finished. No error reported.

This is the contents of the device map /boot/grub/device.map.

Check if this is correct or not. If any of the lines is incorrect,

fix it and re-run the script `grub-install’.

 

# this device map was generated by anaconda

(hd0)     /dev/cciss/c0d0

 

18. Remove the /boot references in the /boot/grub/grub.conf file.

 

[root@lab1 ~]# vi /boot/grub/grub.conf

[root@lab1 ~]# cat /boot/grub/grub.conf

# grub.conf generated by anaconda

#

# Note that you do not have to rerun grub after making changes to this file

# NOTICE:  You do not have a /boot partition.  This means that

#          all kernel and initrd paths are relative to /, eg.

#          root (hd0,0)

#          kernel /boot/vmlinuz-version ro root=/dev/cciss/c0d0p1

#          initrd /boot/initrd-version.img

#boot=/dev/cciss/c0d0

default=0

timeout=5

splashimage=(hd0,0)/grub/splash.xpm.gz

hiddenmenu

title Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server (2.6.18-92.el5)

       root (hd0,0)

       kernel /vmlinuz-2.6.18-92.el5 ro root=/dev/cciss/c0d0p3 pci=nommconf rhgb quiet

       initrd /initrd-2.6.18-92.el5.img

 

19. Reboot, and it will boot off the new /boot partition.

 

[root@lab1 ~]# df -k

Filesystem           1K-blocks      Used Available Use% Mounted on

/dev/cciss/c0d0p3     18587892   2984528  14659144  17% /

/dev/cciss/c0d0p1       155543     15571    131942  11% /boot

tmpfs                  1029044         0   1029044   0% /dev/shm

 

20. Initialize the LVM

 

[root@lab1 /]# vgscan

  Reading all physical volumes.  This may take a while…

  Found volume group “uservg” using metadata type lvm2

 

21. Create a physical volume on partition 2 that was created earlier.

 

[root@lab1 /]# pvcreate /dev/cciss/c0d0p2

  Physical volume “/dev/cciss/c0d0p2” successfully created

 

22. Create the root volume group on the partition just created.

 

[root@lab1 /]# vgcreate rootvg /dev/cciss/c0d0p2

  Volume group “rootvg” successfully created

 

23. Create a logical volume for the new root volume group.

 

[root@lab1 /]# lvcreate -n lv00 –size 18G rootvg

  Logical volume “lv00” created

 

24. Create a filesystem on the new logical volume.

 

[root@lab1 /]# mke2fs -j /dev/rootvg/lv00

mke2fs 1.39 (29-May-2006)

Filesystem label=

OS type: Linux

Block size=4096 (log=2)

Fragment size=4096 (log=2)

2359296 inodes, 4718592 blocks

235929 blocks (5.00%) reserved for the super user

First data block=0

Maximum filesystem blocks=4294967296

144 block groups

32768 blocks per group, 32768 fragments per group

16384 inodes per group

Superblock backups stored on blocks:

       32768, 98304, 163840, 229376, 294912, 819200, 884736, 1605632, 2654208,

       4096000

 

Writing inode tables: done                           

Creating journal (32768 blocks): done

Writing superblocks and filesystem accounting information: done

 

This filesystem will be automatically checked every 29 mounts or

180 days, whichever comes first.  Use tune2fs -c or -i to override.

 

25. Mount the new filesystem and copy the root files over.

 

[root@lab1 /]# mount -t ext3 /dev/rootvg/lv00 /mnt

[root@lab1 /]# cd /

[root@lab1 /]# find / -xdev | cpio -pvmd /mnt

……..

/mnt/usr/include/gnome-desktop-2.0/libgnomeui

/mnt/usr/include/gnome-desktop-2.0/libgnomeui/gnome-ditem-edit.h

/mnt/usr/include/gnome-desktop-2.0/libgnomeui/gnome-hint.h

/mnt/usr/include/mpfr.h

/mnt/usr/include/ftw.h

/mnt/usr/include/spawn.h

/mnt/lost+found

5030570 blocks

[root@lab1 /]#

 

26. Recreate the initrd image.

 

[root@lab1 /]# mkinitrd –f /boot/initrd-2.6.18-92.el5.img `uname –r`

 

27. Make sure the initrd image is configured for LVM.

 

[root@lab1 /]# cd /tmp

[root@lab1 tmp]# mkdir working-intitrd

[root@lab1 tmp]# cd working-intitrd

[root@lab1 working-intitrd]# zcat /boot/initrd-2.6.18-92.el5.img|cpio -i

17771 blocks

[root@lab1 working-intitrd]# ls bin/lvm

bin/lvm

[root@lab1 working-intitrd]# ls etc/lvm

lvm.conf

 

 

28. If the image does not LVM support it can be added this way.

 

[root@lab1 working-intitrd]# cp -r /etc/lvm etc/

cp: overwrite `etc/lvm/backup/rootvg’? y

cp: overwrite `etc/lvm/backup/uservg’? y

cp: overwrite `etc/lvm/archive/rootvg_00001.vg’? y

cp: overwrite `etc/lvm/archive/uservg_00000.vg’? y

cp: overwrite `etc/lvm/archive/rootvg_00000.vg’? y

cp: overwrite `etc/lvm/lvm.conf.default’? y

cp: overwrite `etc/lvm/cache/.cache’? y

cp: overwrite `etc/lvm/lvm.conf’? y

[root@lab1 working-intitrd]# pwd

/tmp/working-intitrd

[root@lab1 working-intitrd]# ls etc/lvm/

archive  backup  cache  lvm.conf  lvm.conf.default

[root@lab1 working-intitrd]# pwd

/tmp/working-intitrd

[root@lab1 working-intitrd]# find . -print | cpio -o -c |gzip -9 > /tmp/initrd-2.6.18-92.el5.img

17817 blocks

 

[root@lab1 working-intitrd]# cp /boot/initrd-2.6.18-92.el5.img /boot/initrd-2.6.18-92.el5.img.bak

[root@lab1 working-intitrd]# ls -l /boot/initrd-2.6.18-92.el5.img.bak /tmp/initrd-2.6.18-92.el5.img

-rw——- 1 root root 3713844 May 20 15:23 /boot/initrd-2.6.18-92.el5.img.bak

-rw-r–r– 1 root root 3716171 May 20 15:22 /tmp/initrd-2.6.18-92.el5.img

[root@lab1 working-intitrd]# cp /boot/initrd-2.6.18-92.el5.img.bak /boot/initrd-2.6.18-92.el5.img

 

29. Edit the /mnt/etc/fstab to reflect the new rootvg volume group

 

[root@lab1 /]# vi /mnt/etc/fstab

[root@lab1 /]# cat /mnt/etc/fstab

/dev/rootvg/lv00     /                       ext3    defaults        1 1

/dev/cciss/c0d0p1    /boot                ext3   defaults      1 2

tmpfs                   /dev/shm                tmpfs   defaults        0 0

devpts                  /dev/pts                devpts  gid=5,mode=620  0 0

sysfs                   /sys                    sysfs   defaults        0 0

proc                    /proc                   proc    defaults        0 0

 

30. Edit the /boot/grub/grub.conf to point to the new rootvg

 

[root@lab1 /]# vi /boot/grub/grub.conf

[root@lab1 /]# cat /boot/grub/grub.conf

# grub.conf generated by anaconda

#

# Note that you do not have to rerun grub after making changes to this file

# NOTICE:  You do not have a /boot partition.  This means that

#          all kernel and initrd paths are relative to /, eg.

#          root (hd0,0)

#          kernel /boot/vmlinuz-version ro root=/dev/cciss/c0d0p1

#          initrd /boot/initrd-version.img

#boot=/dev/cciss/c0d0

default=0

timeout=5

splashimage=(hd0,0)/grub/splash.xpm.gz

hiddenmenu

title Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server (2.6.18-92.el5)

       root (hd0,0)

       kernel /vmlinuz-2.6.18-92.el5 ro root=/dev/rootvg/lv00 pci=nommconf rhgb quiet

       initrd /initrd-2.6.18-92.el5.img

 

31. Run grub-install to recreate the MBR.

 

[root@lab1 /]# grub-install /dev/cciss/c0d0

Installation finished. No error reported.

This is the contents of the device map /boot/grub/device.map.

Check if this is correct or not. If any of the lines is incorrect,

fix it and re-run the script `grub-install’.

 

# this device map was generated by anaconda

(hd0)     /dev/cciss/c0d0

 

32. Reboot, and it should come up under LVM support.

 

[root@lab1 ~]# df -k

Filesystem           1K-blocks      Used Available Use% Mounted on

/dev/mapper/rootvg-lv00

                      18578172   2984604  14649852  17% /

/dev/cciss/c0d0p1       155543     19214    128299  14% /boot

tmpfs                  1029044         0   1029044   0% /dev/shm

 

33. Delete the temporary root partition 3.

 

[root@lab1 ~]# fdisk /dev/cciss/c0d0

 

The number of cylinders for this disk is set to 8920.

There is nothing wrong with that, but this is larger than 1024,

and could in certain setups cause problems with:

1) software that runs at boot time (e.g., old versions of LILO)

2) booting and partitioning software from other OSs

   (e.g., DOS FDISK, OS/2 FDISK)

 

Command (m for help): p

 

Disk /dev/cciss/c0d0: 73.3 GB, 73372631040 bytes

255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 8920 cylinders

Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

 

           Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System

/dev/cciss/c0d0p1   *           1          20      160618+  83  Linux

/dev/cciss/c0d0p2              21        2370    18876375   8e  Linux LVM

/dev/cciss/c0d0p3            2371        4721    18884407+  83  Linux

 

Command (m for help): d

Partition number (1-4): 3

 

Command (m for help): w

The partition table has been altered!

 

Calling ioctl() to re-read partition table.

 

WARNING: Re-reading the partition table failed with error 16: Device or resource busy.

The kernel still uses the old table.

The new table will be used at the next reboot.

Syncing disks.

[root@lab1 ~]# partprobe

 

34. Create a swap partition.

 

[root@lab1 ~]# fdisk /dev/cciss/c0d0

 

The number of cylinders for this disk is set to 8920.

There is nothing wrong with that, but this is larger than 1024,

and could in certain setups cause problems with:

1) software that runs at boot time (e.g., old versions of LILO)

2) booting and partitioning software from other OSs

   (e.g., DOS FDISK, OS/2 FDISK)

 

Command (m for help): p

 

Disk /dev/cciss/c0d0: 73.3 GB, 73372631040 bytes

255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 8920 cylinders

Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

 

           Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System

/dev/cciss/c0d0p1   *           1          20      160618+  83  Linux

/dev/cciss/c0d0p2              21        2370    18876375   8e  Linux LVM

 

Command (m for help): n

Command action

   e   extended

   p   primary partition (1-4)

p

Partition number (1-4): 3

First cylinder (2371-8920, default 2371): 2371

Last cylinder or +size or +sizeM or +sizeK (2371-8920, default 8920): +8192M

 

Command (m for help): p

 

Disk /dev/cciss/c0d0: 73.3 GB, 73372631040 bytes

255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 8920 cylinders

Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

 

           Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System

/dev/cciss/c0d0p1   *           1          20      160618+  83  Linux

/dev/cciss/c0d0p2              21        2370    18876375   8e  Linux LVM

/dev/cciss/c0d0p3            2371        3367     8008402+  83  Linux

 

Command (m for help): t

Partition number (1-4): 82

Value out of range.

Partition number (1-4): p

Partition number (1-4): 3

Hex code (type L to list codes): 82

Changed system type of partition 3 to 82 (Linux swap / Solaris)

 

Command (m for help): p

 

Disk /dev/cciss/c0d0: 73.3 GB, 73372631040 bytes

255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 8920 cylinders

Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

 

           Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System

/dev/cciss/c0d0p1   *           1          20      160618+  83  Linux

/dev/cciss/c0d0p2              21        2370    18876375   8e  Linux LVM

/dev/cciss/c0d0p3            2371        3367     8008402+  82  Linux swap / Solaris

 

Command (m for help): w

The partition table has been altered!

 

Calling ioctl() to re-read partition table.

 

WARNING: Re-reading the partition table failed with error 16: Device or resource busy.

The kernel still uses the old table.

The new table will be used at the next reboot.

Syncing disks.

[root@lab1 ~]# partprobe

 

35. Create swap space on the partition.

 

[root@lab1 ~]# mkswap /dev/cciss/c0d0p3

Setting up swapspace version 1, size = 8200597 kB

[root@lab1 ~]# vi /etc/fstab

[root@lab1 ~]# cat /etc/fstab

/dev/rootvg/lv00     /                       ext3    defaults        1 1

/dev/cciss/c0d0p1    /boot                ext3   defaults      1 2

tmpfs                   /dev/shm                tmpfs   defaults        0 0

devpts                  /dev/pts                devpts  gid=5,mode=620  0 0

sysfs                   /sys                    sysfs   defaults        0 0

proc                    /proc                   proc    defaults        0 0

/dev/cciss/c0d0p3    swap                 swap   defaults      0 0

[root@lab1 ~]# mount -a

[root@lab1 ~]# swapon -a

[root@lab1 ~]# swapon -s

Filename                          Type          Size   Used   Priority

/dev/cciss/c0d0p3                       partition      8008392       0      -1

 

35. Reboot and make sure everything comes up okay.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’ve been in the IT industry for over 15 years, and I am currently a System Administrator specializing in AIX, Solaris, and Redhat.

Anthony Cicone
www.agccomputerservices.com

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