Posts Tagged ‘Bands’

Nice Washington Bands photos

September 15th, 2016

A few nice washington bands images I found:

Meet The Marching Bands Backstage – Patrick’s Day Parade (Dublin)
washington bands
Image by infomatique
Marching ensembles from around the globe provided the musical score for the festival parade on March 17th 2012.

Bands from Ireland, Northern Ireland, the United Kingdom and Russia will join U.S. bands from California, Georgia, Indiana, Missouri, North Carolina, Texas and Washington to march through the streets of the capital.

The following bands took part:
The White Russian Central Band (Russia)
Shorecrest Highlander Marching Band, Washington (USA)
Marvin Ridge High School Band, North Carolina (USA)
Clondalkin Youth Band, Dublin (Ireland)
John F. Kennedy High School (Shamrock Regiment), California (USA)
Berkner Bandolera Drill Team, Texas (USA)
Romford Drum & Trumpet Corps (UK)
Permian High School, Texas (USA)
Notre Dame, Indiana (USA)
Tri-County Marching Cavaliers Band, Indiana (USA)
Wildcats Marching Band, Georgia (USA)
University of Missouri, Missouri (USA)

2013 Cherry Blossom Festival Parade
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Image by Chase McAlpine
Photos from the 2013 National Cherry Blossom Festival Parade

2013 National Memorial Day Parade
washington bands
Image by Chase McAlpine
Thousands of DC Area residents and tourists gathered along Constitution Avenue in Washington, DC on Monday, May 27th, 2013 to watch the Annual National Memorial Day Parade.

Music | Posted by Fabrice Dollmach

Lastest Washington Bands News

September 5th, 2016

Washington DC Trip
washington bands
Image by bearcatbands
UC Band_UC vs VT_FedEx Stadium_Washington, DC

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Nice Washington Bands photos

September 3rd, 2016

Some cool washington bands images:

Image from page 60 of “Washington, what to see, and how to see it. A sightseer’s guide ..” (1888)
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Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: washingtonwhatto00keim
Title: Washington, what to see, and how to see it. A sightseer’s guide ..
Year: 1888 (1880s)
Authors: Keim, De B. Randolph (De Benneville Randolph), 1841-1914
Subjects:
Publisher: Washington, D.C.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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Text Appearing Before Image:
INTERIOR DEPARTIVIENT, (PATENT OFFICE.) on the N. portion of Judiciary Square, is the U. S. Pension Building, 400×200 and 75 high. It is fire-proof throughout. The frieze over the first storyconsists of a terra cotta sculpture band 3 high, representing Military andNaval subjects. The building cost 0,000 and required 15,000,000 bricks.The court will accommodate 12,000 persons at an inauguration ball, and59,000 persons closely packed.

Text Appearing After Image:
THE general post-office. After passing 7th St., on the N. stands the Department of the Interior(Patent Office), open from 9 a. m. to 2 p. m. This massive structure, 453×331, was erected i836-6o, and cost ,500,000. The centre is of free stoneand the wings of marble, resting on a basement of granite. 58 MC PHERSON—FARRAGUT—SCOTT STATUES. The Museum of Models of the Patent Office, open from 9 a. m. to 4 p. m.,contains 200,000 models. The four halls are of superb construction, andcontain many objects of historic interest in addition to the valuable andinstructive collection of models, representing the inventive genius of theAmerican people. Directly S. of the Interior Department is the GeneralPost-Office, open from 9 a. m. to 2 p. m. Commenced in 1839 andfinished in 1867; cost, ,700,000. The structure is of marble and belongsto the Corinthian order. In the suite of apartments of the Postmaster-General, is a collection of Crayon Portraits of those Officers since thefoundation of th

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Image from page 322 of “The natural history of Washington territory, with much relating to Minnesota, Nebraska, Kansas, Oregon, and California, between the thirty-sixth and forty-ninth parallels of latitude, being those parts of the final reports on the s
washington bands
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: naturalhistoryof00coop
Title: The natural history of Washington territory, with much relating to Minnesota, Nebraska, Kansas, Oregon, and California, between the thirty-sixth and forty-ninth parallels of latitude, being those parts of the final reports on the survey of the Northern Pacific railroad route, containing the climate and physical geography, with full catalogues and descriptions of the plants and animals collected from 1853 to 1857
Year: 1859 (1850s)
Authors: Cooper, J. G. (James Graham), 1830-1902 Suckley, George, 1830-1869 Cooper, William, 1798?-1864 Gibbs, George, 1815-1873 Gray, Asa, 1810-1888 LeConte, John L. (John Lawrence), 1825-1883 United States. War Dept. Reports of explorations and surveys, to ascertain the … route for a railroad from the Mississippi River to the Pacific Ocean
Subjects: Natural history
Publisher: New York : Baillière brothers, London, H. Baillière [etc., etc.]
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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lack, the tail with about four white bands, or unspotted. Ho. 4476, adult female. Straits of Fuca, April, 1855. Length, 12. 50 ; extent, 27 inches. No. 4475, adult male, Santa Clara, Cal., November, 1855. Length, 11. 75; extent, 23. 50. No. 4477, young male, Shoalwater bay, August, 1855. Length, 10. 25 ; extent, 22. 50. Iris brown, bill bluish black, cere and feet yellow, in all the specimens. The pigeon hawk seems to be rather uncommon in the Territory. I shot one in June, 1853,and did not see another until April, 1855, when they had just arrived at the Straits of DeFuca. I was surprised one day by an unusual screaming of some bird close to the house, andgoing out I found that one of these hawks had just caught an unfortunate flicker^ \yhich- probably feared no assault from a bird no larger than itself. Its weight brought the hawk tothe ground, where I immediately shot it. On picking it up the flicker, though unhurt either U SP B/R E>n-, & SuT^evs 47*^ Parallel Birds Plat;; XI

Text Appearing After Image:
FALCO NI&RICEPS ZOOLOGY. 143 by the hawk or my shot, was so frightened that it made no effort to escape from the clawswhich still held it with the grasp of death. When I released it it flew to a tree near by, andfor some time showed its astonishment and joy by loud cries. As the pigeon hawk is found in summer, it doubtless breeds in the Territory. In August,1855, I shot one of a small family of young which had but lately left the nest. They probablymigrate southward in winter, as I found them abundant in California in October andNovember.—C. About the 1st of August this bird becomes very abundant in the vicinity of Fort Steilacoom,W. T. During the summer and autumn of 1856 I obtained a number of specimens in differentstages of phunage. Several of these had regular oval spots of rust or cinnamon color on theinner vanes of the primaries. In this character these birds appear to resemble the birdnoticed by Cassin in the birds of California, Texas, &c., among the doubtful and obs

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Music | Posted by Gertrude Brent

Nice Washington Bands photos

August 28th, 2016

A few nice washington bands images I found:

Happy Travelers Go to Washington, D.C.
washington bands
Image by Old Shoe Woman
On Sunday, May 1, 2011; the Happy Travelers enjoyed breakfast at the Hampton Inn in Chantilly, VA. Our bus driver took us to Arlington National Cemetery where we met our guide. We boarded the Tourmobile for a trip through the cemetery with stops at Kennedy’s grave and the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Before leaving the cemetery, we toured the Women in Military Museum.

Next our bus took us to the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History. There we ate lunch at the Atrium Cafe. We saw the Hope Diamond, an Insect Zoo, and shopped in the gift shops.

Finally our bus drove us to the Holiday Inn in Sterling, VA where we enjoyed a delicious buffet with turkey, fish, mashed potatoes, green beans, salad, and Tiramisu. While we ate, we were enjoyed by the band, Just Friends. After the meal, several people enjoyed getting up on the dance floor and entertaining everyone else.

Again we enjoyed our last night at the Hampton Inn in Chantilly, VA.

2009 08 01 – 8087 – Washington DC – 930 Club – Xavier Rudd
washington bands
Image by thisisbossi
Xavier Rudd was phenomenal: the best concert I’ve been to at the 9:30 Club, and very likely in the running (and perhaps winner) of the best concert I’ve ever been to… ever.

I never heard of Xavier Rudd until about a month before the concert, when my friend Lindsey sent me a link to a Youtube video & asked if I wanted to go. The sound of the didgeridoos w/ a rock ensemble instantly grabbed my attention, so I readily said "yes".

Xavier is a relaxed guy… he’s so peaceful, and his charisma grabs at the audience — drawing them right into every song. His talent is tough to equate: he swapped instruments every song, and I was impressed with how — in the same song: he could play a guitar, play percussion, sing vocals, and blow into the didge. Bravo.

The two others on stage — one on drums and one on bass — both had distinct personalities; and both frequently emerging from their background positions (if ever it could be said they were much more background than Xavier was). It’s rare to see bassists stay in the spotlight: but this bassist was on center stage the whole show.

Even the stagehand joined on banjo at one point, and dagnabit he was good… if only they put some more light on him & gave him a little more airtime. It’s not often a stagehand has his own stagehand.

When I saw the Disco Biscuits back on 4/20: the show was stellar, but the crowd was disappointing. Granted, I’m straight edge… so I don’t smoke nor drink… so yeah, I was well aware that I was seeing a pot band on April 20th. Nonetheless, the crowd was downright obnoxious and ruined what could’ve otherwise been a great show. Here with Xavier Rudd, however: the crowd was by and large coherent and able to leap about, scream, and throw up their arms without spilling their drinks all over the place or falling into everyone around them.

One exception was during the last two songs, when in separate events the girl behind me dropped her beer on me… and then the girls in front of me rushed the stage — causing every other woman in the front to also rush; and women further back to make an attempt. One girl on stage may or may not have been aware that she was falling out of her dress in front of everyone. The woman that ended up in front of me — almost separating me from Lindsey & successfully separating a nearby couple — got to experience my "OMG I’M A DRUNK FANBOY LOLZ" personality, which is amazing at getting annoying people away from me. She got out of there in about a minute.

I’ve gone from having never heard of Xavier Rudd to joining every social networking outlet he has… now I’m holding my breath for when he returns, and I have a newfound desire to pick up a didgeridoo during my trek to Oceania this winter.

2009 08 01 – 8081 – Washington DC – 930 Club – Xavier Rudd
washington bands
Image by thisisbossi
Xavier Rudd was phenomenal: the best concert I’ve been to at the 9:30 Club, and very likely in the running (and perhaps winner) of the best concert I’ve ever been to… ever.

I never heard of Xavier Rudd until about a month before the concert, when my friend Lindsey sent me a link to a Youtube video & asked if I wanted to go. The sound of the didgeridoos w/ a rock ensemble instantly grabbed my attention, so I readily said "yes".

Xavier is a relaxed guy… he’s so peaceful, and his charisma grabs at the audience — drawing them right into every song. His talent is tough to equate: he swapped instruments every song, and I was impressed with how — in the same song: he could play a guitar, play percussion, sing vocals, and blow into the didge. Bravo.

The two others on stage — one on drums and one on bass — both had distinct personalities; and both frequently emerging from their background positions (if ever it could be said they were much more background than Xavier was). It’s rare to see bassists stay in the spotlight: but this bassist was on center stage the whole show.

Even the stagehand joined on banjo at one point, and dagnabit he was good… if only they put some more light on him & gave him a little more airtime. It’s not often a stagehand has his own stagehand.

When I saw the Disco Biscuits back on 4/20: the show was stellar, but the crowd was disappointing. Granted, I’m straight edge… so I don’t smoke nor drink… so yeah, I was well aware that I was seeing a pot band on April 20th. Nonetheless, the crowd was downright obnoxious and ruined what could’ve otherwise been a great show. Here with Xavier Rudd, however: the crowd was by and large coherent and able to leap about, scream, and throw up their arms without spilling their drinks all over the place or falling into everyone around them.

One exception was during the last two songs, when in separate events the girl behind me dropped her beer on me… and then the girls in front of me rushed the stage — causing every other woman in the front to also rush; and women further back to make an attempt. One girl on stage may or may not have been aware that she was falling out of her dress in front of everyone. The woman that ended up in front of me — almost separating me from Lindsey & successfully separating a nearby couple — got to experience my "OMG I’M A DRUNK FANBOY LOLZ" personality, which is amazing at getting annoying people away from me. She got out of there in about a minute.

I’ve gone from having never heard of Xavier Rudd to joining every social networking outlet he has… now I’m holding my breath for when he returns, and I have a newfound desire to pick up a didgeridoo during my trek to Oceania this winter.

Music | Posted by Victoria Addington

Lastest Washington Bands News

August 18th, 2016

AUBURN UNIVERSITY MARCHING BAND
washington bands
Image by infomatique
The following Marching Bands took part in the Dublin parade on Monday 17th. March 2008:

AUBURN UNIVERSITY MARCHING BAND
Founded in 1897, this is the USA’s oldest Marching Band. In 2004 they received the Sudler Intercollegiate Marching Band Trophy, the nation’s highest and most coveted award for college bands.

BRADLEY CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL BAND – CLEVELAND TENNESSEE
Founded in 1917, they were recently placed first in class at the USSBA Scholastic Marching Band Competition. This is their first trip overseas to attend the Dublin Parade.

"PRIDE OF THE IRISH" CATHEDRAL HIGH SCHOOL MARCHING BAND – INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA
Cathedral have received Division I ratings in music contests across the state. They have appeared on national TV and marched here in Dublin in 2000.

COUNCIL ROCK SOUTH MARCHING BAND – HOLLAND, PENNSYLVANIA
Established in 2002, Council have quickly built a reputation of spirit and excellence at local, national and international levels.

FREEDOM HIGH SCHOOL PATRIOT BAND – BETHLEHEM, PENNSYLVANIA
In 1992 they were inducted into the National High School Band Director’s Hall of Fame as "Band of the Year". They are now under the direction of Mr. Michael Moran.

GILBERT HIGH SCHOOL TIGER PRIDE BAND – PHOENIX, ARIZONA
Gilbert High School have a remarkable performance record and have consistently received Superior ratings in marching and concert festivals nationally.

HUNTSVILLE HIGH SCHOOL – HUNTSVILLE, ALABAMA
With an enviable record of achievement, Huntsville are consistently rated superior in competitions. They have performed throughout the US and Europe. In 2004 they won first prize at the prestigious Gothenburg Music Festival in Sweden.

JOHN F. KENNEDY HIGH SCHOOL BAND – LA PALMA, CALIFORNIA
This band has risen from 35 to 260 members since it’s inception in 1993. Having received many superior rating, they performed at the opening ceremony of the Olympic Games in Australia.

LOCK HAVEN UNIVERSITY MARCHING BAND – LOCK HAVEN, PENNSYLVANIA
Lockhaven Marching Band are now in their 67th year. The members range in age from 18 to 35.

SHORECREST HIGHLANDER HIGH SCHOOL MARCHING BAND – SHORELINE, WASHINGTON
Shorecrest have performed and won every major parade in the Pacific Northwest. This is their 4th visit to Ireland.

TATE HIGH SCHOOL "SHOWBAND OF THE SOUTH" MARCHING BAND – CANTONMENT, FLORIDA
Tate have won countless competitions and earned the reputation as one of the top high schools bands in the US. They have marched in every major parade in the US.

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS – CHAMPAIGNE, ILLINOIS
UIUC’s is the world’s largest college band program. In 1930 they hosted John Philip Sousa, who called them "The World’s Greatest College Band" and donated his library to the school.

WEST BEND HIGH SCHOOL MARCHING BAND – WEST BEND, WISCONSIN
The West Bend High School Marching Band was formed in the 1930s. The band has produced two CDs and has received numerous first and second place trophies in adjudicated parades.

YOUNGSVILLE HIGH SCHOOL MARCHING EAGLES – YOUNGSVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA
The Marching Eagles marched here in Dublin in 2003. They have 14 years of Superior Ratings at the Pennsylvania Music Educators Association Adjudication Festival.

CLONDALKIN YOUTH BAND – CLONDLAKIN, DUBLIN
Celebrating their 23rd anniversary this year, the Clondalkin Youth Band are All Ireland Champions, European Marching Band Champions and World Marching Champions. They are Ireland’s largest marching band.

"STORICI SBANDIERATORI DELLE CONTRADE DI CORI": ITALIAN FLAGWAVERS – CORI, ITALY
Founded in 1976 in Italy this band practice the medieval waving of the flag from the 16th century. They consist of the Herald, Trumpeters, Drummers and Flag Wavers.

SANYO MARCHING BAND AND BATON TWIRLERS – HIROSHIMA, JAPAN
The esteemed Sanyo Band have won 6 gold and 3 Best Band of the Year Awards at the National Contest In Japan. The remarkable Baton Twirlers have received first prize for 20 consecutive years.

Music | Posted by Victoria Addington

Wonder Treats That Bands Fantasize About

August 7th, 2016

A few nice washington bands images I found:

Wonder Treats That Bands Fantasize About
washington bands
Image by Indie Bands With a Mission
Our book with recipes from your favorite indie bands: Hotspur, Lights Resolve, Of Color, The Early Coastal, Mozart’s Sister, BOYS will be BOYS, Margot MacDonald, Matt in the Clouds & Playground Etiquette.

For more info, check out our profile page! 🙂
Check out the bands’ music at myspace.com/indiebandswithamission

100% of all profits benefit Washington DC food banks ^_^

Photos by Mike Washington Photography
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Image by rawartistsmedia
Photos by Mike Washington Photography

Music | Posted by Fabrice Dollmach

Lastest Washington Bands News

August 1st, 2016

Photos by Mike Washington Photography
washington bands
Image by rawartistsmedia
Photos by Mike Washington Photography

Music | Posted by

Nice Washington Bands photos

June 23rd, 2016

Some cool washington bands images:

Batala31.FunkParade.UStreet.WDC.3May2014
washington bands
Image by Elvert Barnes
1st Annual U STREET FUNK PARADE / MARCH on U between 13th and 14th Street, NW, Washington DC on Saturday evening, 3 May 2014 by Elvert Barnes Photography

Batala Washington Women Percussion Band
www.batalawashington.com/

Follow U STREET FUNK PARADE at www.facebook.com/events/188658631343775/

Elvert Barnes 1st U STREET FUNK PARADE 2014 docu-project at elvertbarnes.com/UStreetFunkParade2014

03.MRPES.Rally.SeaOfBlue.NLEOM.WDC.17January2015
washington bands
Image by Elvert Barnes
END THE MADNESS / SEA OF BLUE DC MARCH in support of LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS Assemblance Rally at the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in the 400 block of E Street, NW, Washington DC on Saturday afternoon, 17 January 2014 by Elvert Barnes Photography

METRO RICHMOND POLICE EMERALD SOCIETY PIBE BAND
mrpes.org/

Follow END THE MADNESS / SEA OF BLUE DC RALLY in support of LEO at www.facebook.com/events/809727462418694/

Follow NATIONAL LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS MEMORIAL FUND at www.facebook.com/NLEOMF

Elvert Barnes Saturday, 17 January 2015 STOP THE MADNESS: SEA OF BLUE DC MARCH docu-project at elvertbarnes.com/SeaOfBlueDC

Music | Posted by Victoria Addington

Cool Washington Bands images

June 14th, 2016

Check out these washington bands images:

23d – The Santa Monica Freeway, Originally called the Olympic Freeway, 1964 (E)
washington bands
Image by Kansas Sebastian
West Adams Heights

“Nowadays we scarcely notice the high stone gates which mark the entrances on Hobart, Harvard, and Oxford streets, south of Washington Boulevard. For one thing, the traffic is too heavy, too swift; and then, again, the gates have been obscured by intrusions of shops and stores. At the base of the stone pillars appears the inscription “West Adams Heights.” There was a time when these entranceways were formidable and haughty, for they marked the ways to one of the first elite residential areas in Los Angeles. . . In the unplanned early-day chaos of Los Angeles, West Adams Heights was obviously something very special, an island in an ocean of bungalows—approachable, but withdrawn and reclusive—one of the few surviving examples of planned urban elegance of the turn of the century.”

– Carey McWilliams, “The Evolution of Sugar Hill,” Script, March, 1949: 30.

Today West Adams Heights is still obviously something special. The past sixty years, however, have not been kind. In 1963 the Santa Monica Freeway cut through the heart of West Adams Heights, dividing the neighborhood, obscuring its continuity. In the 1970’s the city paved over the red brick streets and removed the ornate street lighting. After the neighborhood’s zoning was changed to a higher density, overzealous developers claimed several mansions for apartment buildings. Despite these challenges, however, “The Heights,” as the area was once known, has managed to regain some of its former elegance.

The West Adams Heights tract was laid out in 1902, in what was then a wheat field on the western edge of town. Although the freeway now creates an artificial barrier, the original neighborhood boundaries were Adams Boulevard, La Salle Ave, Washington Boulevard, and Western Avenue. Costly improvements were integrated into the development, such as 75-food wide boulevards (which were some of the first contoured streets not to follow the city grid), lots elevated from the sidewalk, ornate street lighting, and large granite monuments with red-brass electroliers at the entrance to every street. These upgrades increased the lot values, which helped ensure the tract would be an enclave for the elite.

One early real estate ad characterized the neighborhood stating: “West Adams Heights needs no introduction to the public: it is already recognized as being far superior to any other tract. Its high and slightly location, its beautiful view of the city and mountains make t a property unequaled by any other in the city.”

The early residents’ were required to sign a detailed restrictive covenant. This hand-written document required property owners to build a “first-class residence,” of at least two stories, costing no less than two-thousand dollars (at a time when a respectable home could be built for a quarter of that amount, including the land), and built no less than thirty-five feet from the property’s primary boundary. Common in early twentieth century, another clause excluded residents from selling or leasing their properties to non-Caucasians.

By the mid 1930’s, however, most of the restrictions had expired. Between 1938 and 1945 many prominent African-Americans began to make “The Heights” their home. According to Carey McWilliams, West Adams Heights became known “Far and wide as the famous Sugar Hill section of Los Angeles,” and enjoyed a clear preeminence over Washington’s smart Le Droit Park, St. Louis’s Enright Street, West Philadelphia, Chicago’s Westchester, and Harlem’s fabulous Sugar Hill.

West Adams Heights, now also known as Sugar Hill, played a major role in the Civil Rights movement in Los Angeles. In 1938 Norman Houston, president of the Golden State Mutual Life Insurance Company, and an African-American, purchased a home at 2211 South Hobart Boulevard. Legal Action from eight homeowners quickly ensued. During that period, other prominent African-Americans began to make Sugar Hill their home – including actress Hattie McDaniels, dentists John and Vada Summerville, actress Louise Beavers, band leader Johnny Otis, and performers Pearl Baily and Ethel Waters, and many more. On December 6, 1945, the “Sugar Hill Cases” were heard before Judge Thurmond Clark, in LA Superior Court. He made history by become the first judge in America to use the 14th Amendment to disallow the enforcement of covenant race restrictions. The Los Angeles Sentinel quoted Judge Clark: “This court is of the opinion that it is time that [African-Americans] are accorded, without reservations and evasions, the full rights guaranteed them under the 14th Amendment.” Gradually, over the last century people of nearly ever background have made historic West Adams their home.

The northern end of West Adams Heights is now protected as part of the Harvard Heights Historic Preservation Overlay Zone (HPOZ). The Historic West Adams area of Los Angeles (which includes West Adams Heights) boasts the highest concentration of turn-of-the-century homes west of the Mississippi, as well as the highest concentration of National Historic Landmarks, National Register of Historic Places, National Historic Districts, State Historic Landmarks, Los Angeles Cultural-Historic Monuments, and Historic Preservation Overlay Zones in the city. The entirety of West Adams Heights should be nominated as a National Register Historic District, for the quality of homes, the prominence of the architects, notoriety of the people who lived in the neighborhood, and the role it played in civil rights.

Perhaps a quote adapted from a fireplace mantle in the Frederick Rindge mansion best symbolizes the optimism which exists in West Adams: “California Shall be Ours as Long as the Stars Remain.”

19 – James G & Rose Ganahl Donovan Residence – 2179 W 20th St, Moved from 2202 S Western Ave – 1903 – Robert Brown Young

James Donovan began as an apprentice to a watch maker in Aurora, IL, working his way up to Lead Mechanic and an eventual partner in the company, before branching into jewelry on his own. Accompanied by his sister in 1894 he came to Los Angeles for a month’s long vacation. At the end he decided to stay one more week – then three more months – and then founded to stay. He began Donovan & Seaman’s Co on Spring St, near Temple, when it was the heart of the LA’s shopping district. He later moved the store to 3rd & Spring St, then 7th & Broadway. When he built his residence, he chose a prominent location, placing it directly in front of the Berkeley Square gates, on the southeast corner of Western Ave and 22nd St. The home was designed by R B Young in a Transitional Victorian/Craftsman style, leaning more toward the Victorian. Young was a prolific architect in Los Angeles, designing many homes and office buildings, including the Vickery-Brunswig Building, San Fernando Building and Clifton’s Brookdale. The house was moved to its present location in 1929 as Western Ave transitioned to a commercial thoroughfare and the street was widened.

20 – Paul W Hoffmann Residence – 1926 S Western Ave – 1904

Charles Albert Rockwell was a partner in the building firm Martin & Rockwell, and through his company built several houses in West Adams Heights, on Western Avenue, including: 1926, 1962 and 2020 S Western Ave. He himself lived at 1962 S Western Ave before moving down the street to 2020 S Western Ave. This Transitional Craftsman/Victorian house he sold to Paul Hoffmann, dealing in loans and real estate. While most of the houses along the commercial corridors have vanished, this house and a few others, have managed to survive mostly intact.

21 – Ellis Doughl and Alphonso Barmann Residence – 1934 S Western Ave – 1905

A 1905 property permit to the building firm Pool & Jones suggests this is one of the few properties in West Adams Heights built on spec (speculation of a perspective buyer). The home was purchased by Ellis Doughl – who may or may not have lived on the property. In 1911 Newton H Foster, a junior clerk for the Santa Fe, appears to be renting the property, and in 1912 the property is sold to F Barmann for ,500. The 1915 City Directory shows Alphonso (Gen Contr), Herbert (Mach), Natalie (Tchr) and Walter (Mach) Barmann at the property. They had moved from their house on the other side of the Heights at 2047 La Salle Ave. Alphanso Barmann was given the general contract for construction of the 10 story Higgins Building in 1909. The house is Transitional Craftsman/Victorian with strong Colonial influences.

22 – Hans B & Ethyleen Nielsen Residence – 2010 S Western Ave – 1911

Built in the “Elizabethan Style” common at the time, this large Transitional Craftsman/Victorian incorporates half timbering and pebble-dash stucco into the design. It appears to have been built for Hans B and Ethyleen Nielsen.

23 – The Santa Monica Freeway – 21st to 22nd Streets – Originally called the Olympic Freeway – 1964

Like a river cutting through the heart of West Adams Heights, the Olympic Freeway as it was first called claimed approximately one-third of the homes, and some of the most significant. The entire block between 21st and 22nd Streets, on Western, Harvard, Hobart and LaSalle were demolished for the project. The prestigious “Harvard Circle” part of West Adams Heights was completely wiped off the map, with only vague and cryptic references left in newspapers and books. This canyon creates a permanent barrier in a once cohesive neighborhood. Plans for the Olympic Freeway were laid out in the 1947, coincidentally occurring a year after racial covenants were determined to be illegal and African-Americans gained the rights to live in the neighborhood. For almost 20 years, until the freeway’s completion in 1964, black leaders called on the city and the State of California to move the path of the freeway to Washington, Venice or Pico, to spare West Adams Heights, or Sugar Hill as it was becoming known. However, the commission overseeing the project ignored them. Even Mayor Bowron participated in efforts to spare Berkeley Square and West Adams Heights, but members of the commission were unmoved. In the early 1960’s the construction equipment arrived, the houses were removed, and one of LA’s most prestigious enclaves was divided.

24 – Kate A Kelley Residence – 2205 S Hobart Blvd – 1905 – Sumner P Hunt and Arthur Wesley Eager

The architecture team of Hunt & Eager designed this home for Kate A Kelley, the widow of John Kelley. She lived there with her sister Jennie MacKay. By 1915 the house was owned by Abram C Denman, Jr., th vice president and general manager of the Southern California Iron and Steele Company. As a boarding house run by the Agape Mission, the house has fallen on hard times, with stucco, an enclosed porch and aluminum windows. But with some time, money and love, the house could be restored.

25 – John & Gertrude D Kahn and Norman O & Edythe Houston Residence – 2211 S Hobart Blvd – 1911 – Milwaukee Building Company

The Kahn-Houston Residence is arguably one of the most important houses in West Adams Heights. It deserves to be a National Register of Historic places. Unfortunately, at this time (2014) its fate is uncertain. The Agape Mission, which has run an illegal boarding house from the property and from 2205 S Hobart, has recently been closed and both properties appear to be in receivership. This house is so important to the historic fabric of the community because it was the home of Norman O Houston, President of the Golden State Mutual – an insurance company for black Americans who could not obtain insurance from white-owned companies at an affordable price. See the Wikipedia article: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norman_O._Houston In 1938 Houston (then Vice-President) purchased the home. Wealthy white owners of the neighborhood prevented him from living in his home by re-establishing the “West Adams Heights Improvement Association,” and attempting to codify the rule preventing non-Caucasians from owning or renting property. In 1945 Norman Houston and the other black property owners won the right in court to legally live in the neighborhood. The house had been originally built for John Kahn, an early pioneer to Los Angeles who first came to Oakland, CA, around 1889 with his brother and opened a dry goods store. John moved to Los Angeles 3 years later and opened a large store in the ground floor of the Nadeau Hotel at 1st & Spring. Around 1897 he sold the enterprise and in 1899 incorporated with Jakob Beck to form Kahn-Beck, manufacturing food stuff, including: “All kinds of candy, macaroni and pastas of all kinds.” The company then grew into one of the largest biscuit making companies as the Kahn-Beck Cracker Company, or Kahn Beck Biscuit Company, and Angelus Biscuit Company. John Kahn passed in 1919. The house built in 1911 by the Milwaukee Building Company is in an avant-garde Spanish/Prairie style.

26 – James D & May C Smith and Louise Beavers-Moore & LeRoy C Moore Residence – 2219 S Hobart Blvd – 1904 – Frank M Tyler

For his first home in West Adams Heights, pioneer real estate developer Richard D Richards commissioned Frank M Tyler to build a 16-room English-styled mansion in 1904. Richards sold the property to James D Smith two years later, moving to another Tyler mansion at 2237 S Hobart Blvd and then to 2208 S Western Ave, where the Richards family lived until 1925. James Smith was proprietor of the James Smith & Co, a clothing store of the finest “ready-made” Franklin Brand clothing for men, established in 1902. For years the company operated from the Bryson Block, before relocating to the more fashionable Broadway. In the early 1940’s Louise Beavers joined Norman Houston (2211 S Hobart Ave) and Hattie McDaniel (2203 S Harvard Blvd) in the Heights. Louise Beavers was a talented actress, acclaimed for her role in Imitation of Life as Delilah. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louise_Beavers Louise was married to her second husband, LeRoy C Moore in 1952. LeRoy was a well-known interior decorator. Together the two lived at this house until Louise’s death in October, 1962, and LeRoy’s death four months later in February, 1963. At first glass the Smith-Beavers Residence appears to be completely remodeled, but comparing it to original renderings little has changed. The front left dormer is missing and at some point someone thought it would be a good idea to cover the house in Sears siding (the original siding is probably underneath). But other than having been divided, the house’s integrity remains intact.

27 – Ellen H (Mrs. Melville Morton) Johnston and Curtis & Ellen Williams Residence (Demolished) – 2237 S Hobart Blvd – 1906 – Frank M Tyler

The second residence in West Adams Heights built for Richard D and Cynthia J Richards, in 1906, has been replaced with a 1950’s apartment building. The first Richards home was located at 2219 S Hobart Blvd (the Smith-Beavers Residence). They lived at this house less than two years before relocating to 2208 S Western Ave, where the couple lived out their lives. This home was sold to Ellen H Johnston (Mrs Melville Morton). Melville Morton Johnston may have died April 3, 1892. If I’ve researched the correct person, he was originally from Clifton, Stanton Island, New York. (I mean, how many men named Melville Morton Johnston can there be? Right?) In 1911 Mrs. Johnson sold the house to Curtis Williams. Curtis died at the home in 1959, at the age of 89. Curtis Williams was a pioneering lumberman who came to Los Angeles in 1895. He was born in Oakland and reared in San Diego. He was an early member of the Los Angeles Country Club, the Jonathan Club, and University Club. The house was a rustic Transitional Victorian/Craftsman, having both elements, designed by Frank M. Tyler. It was a perfectly balanced house, whose presence looks more like it would have been designed by John Austin.

28 – Benjamin Johnson Residence – 2241 S Hobart Blvd – 1909 – G A Howard, Jr.

In 1909 Benjamin Johnson commissioned G A Howard to build this charming Transitional Craftsman/Victorian in an English Style. The cost in 1909 was a mere ,000. As president of the Los Angeles Public Market Co (a company owned by Pacific Electric), he could well afford the cost – as well as a domestic, cook and chauffeur. What he could not afford, however, was a scandal involving his under-aged rebel daughter Estelle. In 1914, on a return trip from finishing school in Washington, DC, after a brief visit to her grandfather in Chicago. For eluded reasons, she was hastily married to Mr. Terrance Ryan. To employ his new son-in-law, Mr. Johnson purchased a produce company and gave Mr. Ryan a position and a promise of a bungalow. This appears not to have been enough, and the Johnsons were forced to petition the courts for the divorce of their daughter and Mr. Ryan on grounds he could not provide. The Johnsons must have been scandalized when the entire affair was laid out in the Los Angeles Times society pages.

29 – John Newton & Annie Berdella Evans Russell Jr. Residence – 2263 S Hobart Blvd – 1906

Above the portico of this residence is the address “2249” S Hobart Blvd, however its legal address (according to the tax assessor’s maps) is actually 2263 S Hobart. The confusion is understandable. The property sits on three lots from what would have been 2249 (where the house actually sits) to the actual address of 2263 (which is the furthest lot south from the house). At this time the architect is unknown, but shows the adept hand of someone like Robert D. Farquar, who designed the John and Dora Haynes mansion on Figueroa in a similar style (demolished), or B. Cooper Corbett, responsible for the magnificent Denker Mansion on Adams Blvd. The house is an Italian Villa, in a Florentine style, years before the practice of designing thematic houses became popular in Los Angeles. This was the home of John Newton Russell, Jr., an insurance man. He was raised mostly in Waco, TX, before moving to Los Angeles with his father, also in the insurance business. Russell ran the Colorado branches of the Frederick Rindge’s Conservative Life Company, before the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. When the company was absorbed into Pacific Mutual, and moved to Los Angeles, Russell was recalled from Colorado to run the “Home Office.” Mr. Russell continued his success in the insurance industry, just as his wife enjoyed great social success. In 1942, their son, John Henry Russell, established the John Newton Russell Memorial Award, as a tribute to his father and mentor, recognizing the accomplishments and contributions of made by an individual in the insurance industry. This is the highest honor awarded by the National Association of Insurance and Financial Advisors (NAIFA), given each year. NAIFA is one of the nation’s oldest and largest associations representing professionals in the insurance and financial industries.

Red-banded Hairstreak wagging its tails
washington bands
Image by treegrow
Calycopis cecrops. Rock Creek Park, Washington, DC, USA

Red Mountains, Ivins, Utah
washington bands
Image by Ken Lund
Ivins is a city in Washington County, Utah, United States and is a part of the St. George Metropolitan Area as a suburb or "bedroom" community. The population was 6,753 at the 2010 census, and it was estimated at 6,930 in 2011. Although Ivins was listed as a town in the 2000 census, it became a city in 1998.

Prior to the arrival of Mormon settlers, this area was inhabited for thousands of years by the Paiute people and their ancestors. The Shivwits Band of Paiutes reservation is located immediately west of Ivins City.

Ivins was born out of the fulfilled dream of several men to bring water to the Santa Clara bench. This was not easy to accomplish. An eight-mile canal had to be built from the Santa Clara creek near the Shem smelter to the bench. This was not an easy undertaking, the route took them over steep mountain sides and deep ravines that needed to be siphoned or plumed. Work began in 1911 and the canal was completed in 1914. Ivins Reservoir was built to store the water in 1918. Civil engineers, Leo A. Snow and Clarence S. Jarvis first conceived the idea in 1909.

When residents decided they wanted a different name for their town than "Santa Clara Bench," they chose "Ivins" after the Mormon Apostle Anthony W. Ivins. He was asked and didn’t object as long as they spelled it right. He then donated 0 toward a chapel and later sent a bell for it.

Ivins is near Tuacahn (an outdoor arts and amphitheater) and Snow Canyon State Park which draw many people to the area. There are many new planned developments (some with golf courses) near or in Ivins, joining the earlier Kayenta and Padre Canyon developments.

Ivins is home to the Kayenta Desert Community which includes the Coyote Gulch Art Village. It also has a labyrinth made from small stones called the Desert Rose.

There are petroglyphs from the Anasazi tribe along the banks of the Santa Clara Creek northwest of Ivins.

The Red Mountain Resort and The Biggest Loser Resort are two spas located in Ivins.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ivins,_Utah

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Text_of_Creative_Commons_…

Music | Posted by

Nice Washington Bands photos

June 5th, 2016

A few nice washington bands images I found:

Meet The Marching Bands Backstage – Patrick’s Day Parade (Dublin)
washington bands
Image by infomatique
Marching ensembles from around the globe provided the musical score for the festival parade on March 17th 2012.

Bands from Ireland, Northern Ireland, the United Kingdom and Russia will join U.S. bands from California, Georgia, Indiana, Missouri, North Carolina, Texas and Washington to march through the streets of the capital.

The following bands took part:
The White Russian Central Band (Russia)
Shorecrest Highlander Marching Band, Washington (USA)
Marvin Ridge High School Band, North Carolina (USA)
Clondalkin Youth Band, Dublin (Ireland)
John F. Kennedy High School (Shamrock Regiment), California (USA)
Berkner Bandolera Drill Team, Texas (USA)
Romford Drum & Trumpet Corps (UK)
Permian High School, Texas (USA)
Notre Dame, Indiana (USA)
Tri-County Marching Cavaliers Band, Indiana (USA)
Wildcats Marching Band, Georgia (USA)
University of Missouri, Missouri (USA)

Basketball
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Image by Silveira Neto
George Washington vs Saint Joseph’s Hawks, basketball match at the Charles E. Smith Athletic Center in Washington, DC.

Rock Royalty Cloth Grocery Bag
washington bands
Image by Indie Bands With a Mission
This bag is an eco-friendly way to buy groceries! It was made out of a black Rock Royalty If It’s Too Loud, You’re Too Old shirt from Wet Seal. This shirt also has a pocket!

When this bag is sold, ONE HUNDRED PERCENT of all proceeds will benefit Indie Bands With A Mission, an informal non-profit organization trying to raise money to help out food banks in the Washington DC area during these tough times.

Music | Posted by Gertrude Brent
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