Posts Tagged ‘Bands’

Cool Washington Bands images

May 29th, 2016

A few nice washington bands images I found:

Chastity Belt – Pop Conference 2015 – 01
washington bands
Image by Joe Mabel
Seattle band Chastity Belt performing Friday, April 17, 2015 as part of Pop Conference 2015. Sky Church of EMP Museum, Seattle, Washington

Image from page 150 of “Chess and playing cards” (1898)
washington bands
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: chessplayingcard00culi
Title: Chess and playing cards
Year: 1898 (1890s)
Authors: Culin, Stewart, 1858-1929 United States National Museum University of Pennsylvania. University Museum
Subjects: Cotton States Exposition (1895 : Atlanta, Ga.) Chess Playing cards Games
Publisher: Washington
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
North: Thlup tsi Jcwa Jcwe, -Yellow medicine seed people.West: Thli a Jcwa Jcwc, Blue medicine seed people.*South: Shi lo a Jcwa lace, Bed medicine seed people.East: K6 ha Jcwa Jcwe, White medicine seed people.Upper region: Kit tsu a Jcwa Jcwe, Variegated medicine seed people.Lower region: Kwi na Jcwa lave, Black medicine seed people.Middle or all-containing region: / to pa nah na Jcwa Jcwe, Of allcolors medicine seed people. 1 For the significance of these colors in Zuni see note, p. 679. The stick with notches(fig. 88), used in the Tewan game, suggests the probability that these painted sticksreplaced others wrapped with colored thread or fabric. Compare with the ancientChinese scepter (iig. 126; banded with live colors by being wrapped with coloredcords. CHESS AND PLAYING-CARDS. 777 7a 5,1. New Mexico. (Cat. No. 20031, Mus. Arcli.. Univ. Penn. Set of four sticks, 5J inches in length, in two pairs, each of whichconsists of a length of reed split in the middle. The inner sides of the

Text Appearing After Image:
Fig.105. SET OF SACRIFICIAL CANES FOR SHO-I.I-WE. (lieverse.) Cat. >. 20031, Museum of Archaeology, University of Pennsylvania. reed are painted as shown in fig. 105, and the opposite rounded sidesscratched with transverse lines and burned, as shown in fig. 106. These were employed, according to Mr. Gushing, in the game of

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Music | Posted by Gertrude Brent

Nice Washington Bands photos

May 27th, 2016

Some cool washington bands images:

02b – Hutton-Pirtle Residence – 2047 La Salle Ave
washington bands
Image by Kansas Sebastian
West Adams Heights

“Nowadays we scarcely notice the high stone gates which mark the entrances on Hobart, Harvard, and Oxford streets, south of Washington Boulevard. For one thing, the traffic is too heavy, too swift; and then, again, the gates have been obscured by intrusions of shops and stores. At the base of the stone pillars appears the inscription “West Adams Heights.” There was a time when these entranceways were formidable and haughty, for they marked the ways to one of the first elite residential areas in Los Angeles. . . In the unplanned early-day chaos of Los Angeles, West Adams Heights was obviously something very special, an island in an ocean of bungalows—approachable, but withdrawn and reclusive—one of the few surviving examples of planned urban elegance of the turn of the century.”

– Carey McWilliams, “The Evolution of Sugar Hill,” Script, March, 1949: 30.

Today West Adams Heights is still obviously something special. The past sixty years, however, have not been kind. In 1963 the Santa Monica Freeway cut through the heart of West Adams Heights, dividing the neighborhood, obscuring its continuity. In the 1970’s the city paved over the red brick streets and removed the ornate street lighting. After the neighborhood’s zoning was changed to a higher density, overzealous developers claimed several mansions for apartment buildings. Despite these challenges, however, “The Heights,” as the area was once known, has managed to regain some of its former elegance.

The West Adams Heights tract was laid out in 1902, in what was then a wheat field on the western edge of town. Although the freeway now creates an artificial barrier, the original neighborhood boundaries were Adams Boulevard, La Salle Ave, Washington Boulevard, and Western Avenue. Costly improvements were integrated into the development, such as 75-food wide boulevards (which were some of the first contoured streets not to follow the city grid), lots elevated from the sidewalk, ornate street lighting, and large granite monuments with red-brass electroliers at the entrance to every street. These upgrades increased the lot values, which helped ensure the tract would be an enclave for the elite.

One early real estate ad characterized the neighborhood stating: “West Adams Heights needs no introduction to the public: it is already recognized as being far superior to any other tract. Its high and slightly location, its beautiful view of the city and mountains make t a property unequaled by any other in the city.”

The early residents’ were required to sign a detailed restrictive covenant. This hand-written document required property owners to build a “first-class residence,” of at least two stories, costing no less than two-thousand dollars (at a time when a respectable home could be built for a quarter of that amount, including the land), and built no less than thirty-five feet from the property’s primary boundary. Common in early twentieth century, another clause excluded residents from selling or leasing their properties to non-Caucasians.

By the mid 1930’s, however, most of the restrictions had expired. Between 1938 and 1945 many prominent African-Americans began to make “The Heights” their home. According to Carey McWilliams, West Adams Heights became known “Far and wide as the famous Sugar Hill section of Los Angeles,” and enjoyed a clear preeminence over Washington’s smart Le Droit Park, St. Louis’s Enright Street, West Philadelphia, Chicago’s Westchester, and Harlem’s fabulous Sugar Hill.

West Adams Heights, now also known as Sugar Hill, played a major role in the Civil Rights movement in Los Angeles. In 1938 Norman Houston, president of the Golden State Mutual Life Insurance Company, and an African-American, purchased a home at 2211 South Hobart Boulevard. Legal Action from eight homeowners quickly ensued. During that period, other prominent African-Americans began to make Sugar Hill their home – including actress Hattie McDaniels, dentists John and Vada Summerville, actress Louise Beavers, band leader Johnny Otis, and performers Pearl Baily and Ethel Waters, and many more. On December 6, 1945, the “Sugar Hill Cases” were heard before Judge Thurmond Clark, in LA Superior Court. He made history by become the first judge in America to use the 14th Amendment to disallow the enforcement of covenant race restrictions. The Los Angeles Sentinel quoted Judge Clark: “This court is of the opinion that it is time that [African-Americans] are accorded, without reservations and evasions, the full rights guaranteed them under the 14th Amendment.” Gradually, over the last century people of nearly ever background have made historic West Adams their home.

The northern end of West Adams Heights is now protected as part of the Harvard Heights Historic Preservation Overlay Zone (HPOZ). The Historic West Adams area of Los Angeles (which includes West Adams Heights) boasts the highest concentration of turn-of-the-century homes west of the Mississippi, as well as the highest concentration of National Historic Landmarks, National Register of Historic Places, National Historic Districts, State Historic Landmarks, Los Angeles Cultural-Historic Monuments, and Historic Preservation Overlay Zones in the city. The entirety of West Adams Heights should be nominated as a National Register Historic District, for the quality of homes, the prominence of the architects, notoriety of the people who lived in the neighborhood, and the role it played in civil rights.

Perhaps a quote adapted from a fireplace mantle in the Frederick Rindge mansion best symbolizes the optimism which exists in West Adams: “California Shall be Ours as Long as the Stars Remain.”

01 – Harvard Street Monument – Harvard Blvd & Washington Blvd, 1902.

Nearly destroyed by neglect and vandals over decades of inner city decay, the Harvard and Hobart Boulevard monuments were restored in 2002.

02 – Frank Southerland & Grace Pirtle Hutton, and John A Pirtle Residence – 2047 La Salle Ave – 1907

According to the property permit, the house was built for E B Spencer in 1906. Most likely he built this house on speculation (as he did two years earlier at 2039-2041 La Salle Ave), because according to the LA County Tax Assessor’s Office, John A Pirtle purchased this property in 1907. The same year there appears an article in the LA Herald announcing the engagement of Frank Southerland Hutton to Miss Grace Pirtle, who lived with her parents at 1819 S Union Ave, and their plans to build a house in Los Angeles after their honeymoon. Another 1907 article indicates the happy couple were married and moved into their new home on La Salle Ave. But, by 1909, they’ve moved to 1827 S Normandie and John A Pirtle is shown at the La Salle house. John Pirtle was a Southern California industrialist who appears to have made his fortune in the oil fields of Tennessee, Alabama, and Texas, through a company called the Beaumont Exchange and the Oriole Oil Company. He also speculated in water, with the West Los Angeles Water Company, West Side Water Company and the Glendale Consolidated Water Company. Frank Hutton was a well-known and respected Los Angeles lawyer, a partner of the firm Schweitzer and Hutton. This 1907 house is an unassuming looking American Craftsman bungalow, which hides its actual size. Beneath the long, low slung slope of the gable is a rather large house of 2-1/2 stories. The rounded, Colonial Revival styled balcony rail is an unusual feature.

03 – Robert K Wilson, J Frank & Virginia N Waters, and Mark & Mamie (May) E Phelps Residence – 2039-2041 La Salle Ave – 1905 – Frank Dale Hudson and Julius W Krause

Dutch Colonial in West Adams Heights is a rare architectural style, probably already deemed to be passé, but two examples exist nonetheless. The other Dutch is on South Hobart, built for C I D Moore, and is turned on its side, giving it a more Cotswold appearance. This Dutch Colonial is a straight-on interpretation of the vernacular. The architect of the house is reported to be Julius W Krause. Prior to 1895 Krause was partnered with Frank Dale Hudson, of the firm Hudson and Munsell. For a time Krause was also the Superintendent of Building for the City of Los Angeles. The original builder of this house was E B Spencer, however it’s obvious he built it in 1905 on speculation (just as he did two years later the house at 2047 La Salle Ave). This house was quickly sold the same year to Robert K Wilson who Just as quickly flipped it in 1907 to J Frank Waters. Six months later Waters sold the residence to Mark and Mamie (May) E Phelps. The Phelps’s lived at this resident until Mark’s death in 1924. Mark Phelps was described as a pioneer of Los Angeles, first finding success in mining, then as a live-stock dealer. He retired just 3 months before his death. By 1926 J E Phillips who was reported to be living at this address was arrested for smuggling Moonshine Whiskey in his car. In 1943, William J Morris, a building contractor, was the resident, according to his obituary.

04 – Wilbur Wells & Blanche Lillian Smith Keim Residence – 2033 La Salle Ave – 1904

Wilbur Wells Keim graduated from the Pharmacy School at UC Berkeley in 1902. He married Miss Blanche Lillian Smith in 1903. A large reception for the couple was held at the West Adams Heights mansion of Wesley W Beckett, 2218 S Harvard Blvd. The couple began building their house on La Salle in 1904. Keim opened a pharmacy with Edward R Neill (Keim-Neill Drug Co) just a few blocks away on the Southwest corner of Washington and Normandie, at 1890 W Washington Boulevard. Their daughter, Lorraine Keim was a 1925 graduate of USC and a member of the Kappa Alpha Sorority. The house itself is a mystery. The front porch is Craftsman. The eves under the second story and the overall shape appear to be Colonial Revival. The front door with the half sidelights and smaller window openings suggest an older structure which was moved to this location and remodeled. The effect, unfortunately, isn’t quite successful.

05 – William A & Rose H Jenkins Residence – 2029 La Salle Ave – 1909

Originally the address was 1949 La Salle Ave, but a reorganization of addresses by the city to make them more uniform changed it to 2029 La Salle Ave sometime around 1909-1910.

06 – Frank A & Marie C Von Violand Vickery Residence – 2025 La Salle Ave – 1909

When Frank A Vickery passed away he left a sizable estate. Numerous properties were advertised for auction in the February 28, 2014, issue of The California Outlook, including three in West Adams Heights (1947 La Salle Ave, 2017 La Salle Ave, and 2025 La Salle Ave). Vickery had purchased these unimproved lots in 1906 from the Gopher Land Company as investments and improved the lots. Frank Vickery was a mining industrialist with many interests, including the Pan-American Hardwoods Company in Mexico and the San Gabriel River Rock Company. The Vickery’s lived at 341 Andrews Blvd (S St Andrews Pl), in a 1907 mansion they built for ,000. According to the LA Times and LA Herald society pages, they entertained often. In May, 1910, the Vickery’s sold their St Andrews Pl home through the Althouse Brothers for ,000, to Mrs. Frederick Fischer, and relocated to their 2025 La Salle Ave home. After Frank Vickery’s death, auction, either the house didn’t sell at auction or his wide decided to continue living at the residence. The 1923-24 Southwestern Blue Book lists her at this location, with visiting on “Third Wednesdays. “ Mrs. Vickery was also a member of the Ebell and Friday Morning Clubs. Although this house must have been smaller and less opulent than their St Andrews Place residence, it is still a handsome American Craftsman home, with only minor alterations.

07 – Income property owned by Frank A Vickery – 2017 La Salle Ave – 1909

When Frank A Vickery passed away he left a sizable estate. Numerous properties were advertised for auction in the February 28, 2014, issue of The California Outlook, including three in West Adams Heights (1947 La Salle Ave, 2017 La Salle Ave, and 2025 La Salle Ave). Vickery had purchased these unimproved lots in 1906 from the Gopher Land Company as investments and improved the lots. Frank Vickery was a mining industrialist with many interests, including the Pan-American Hardwoods Company in Mexico and the San Gabriel River Rock Company. The house is American Craftsman, and the architect and builder was the Alfred E Georgian, Co.

08 – La Salle Ave Streetscape
Looking South on La Salle Ave (from left to right):
A. 2047 La Salle Ave – Hutton-Pirtle Residence
B. 2041 La Salle Ave – Phelps Residence
C. 2029 La Salle Ave – Hull Residence
D. 2033 La Salle Ave – Keim Residence
E. 2025 La Salle Ave – Frank A & Marie C Von Violand Vickery Residence
F. 2017 La Salle Ave – Income Property owned by Frank A Vickery

09 – Stanley Frederick & Sue A Shaffer McClung – 1959 La Salle Ave – 1905 – Robert Farquhar Train & Robert Edmund Williams

Imagine this house as it might have been in 1905: the long sloping roof of natural shingles, which would have matched the color of the shingled siding; ornate rails along the porch, widows weep, and above the bay window; a full chimney and no bars on the windows or doors. The effect would have been striking, and will again when the house is one day restored. It’s one of the most significant surviving houses on La Salle. It was designed by the architecture team of Robert Farquar Train and Robert Edmund Williams (Train & Williams), for Pacific Mutual Secretary Stanley F McClung. He was part of the “Old Company” forced out of power in the early 1930’s along with his brother-in-law George Ira Cochran.

10 – Income property owned by Frank A Vickery – 1947 La Salle Ave – 1909

When Frank A Vickery passed away he left a sizable estate. Numerous properties were advertised for auction in the February 28, 2014, issue of The California Outlook, including three in West Adams Heights (1947 La Salle Ave, 2017 La Salle Ave, and 2025 La Salle Ave). Vickery had purchased these unimproved lots in 1906 from the Gopher Land Company as investments and improved the lots. Frank Vickery was a mining industrialist with many interests, including the Pan-American Hardwoods Company in Mexico and the San Gabriel River Rock Company. The house is a handsome American Craftsman residence, making use of horizontal siding to make it appear wider.

11 – Evan G & Matilee Loeb Evans and William A & Rose H Haley Jenkins Residence – 1929 La Salle Ave – 1903 – Allied Arts Co

This home is American Craftsman designed in 1903 by The Allied Arts Co (as was its neighbor at 1919 La Salle Ave), a prominent architecture firm responsible for many LA landmarks, including the recently restored Hall of Justice. A J Carlson was the contractor. Evan G Evans, from Chicago, IL, arrived in Los Angeles in the late 1990’s, and married Matilee Loeb in 1898. The Mr & Mrs Evans were prominent in the society pages. The second owner, William (Will) Jenkins, was like many of his neighbors, a Capitalist. Jenkins appears to have had his hand in many enterprises, including the Madera Canal & Irrigation Company. Mrs. Jenkins passed away August 5, 1933, at her home at 148 S Irving Blvd, survived by her husband.

12 – John H & Evangeline “Eva” Rose Clark Tupper and Thomas M & Mary P Sloan Residence – 1919 La Salle Ave – 1903 – Allied Arts Co

John H and Wilbur S Tupper were born in Evansville, Wisconsin, the children of John H and Mary Sophia Foster Tupper. In the 1800’s the brothers relocated in San Francisco found themselves in the insurance industry. Wilbur Tupper became Vice-President of Conservative Life and again both brothers moved to Los Angeles. Wilbur was destined for success and after the death of then-president Frederick Hastings Rindge, he became president of both Conservative Life and Pacific Mutual (founded by Leland Stanford). Wilbur’s house was located at 2237 S Harvard Blvd and John’s at 1919 La Salle Ave, within the same tract. In 1906 Wilbur suddenly resigned from the company in scandal involving another woman (not his wife). He fled to Chicago, abandoning his wife and position. His brother John probably suffered for his brother’s indiscretion, which may help explain his sudden departure from the neighborhood and the sale of his house to Thomas M Sloan. About the same time Thomas Sloan had been promoted to Assistant General Freight Agent of the Sante Fe Railroad. This transitional Victorian/Craftsman house was designed in 1903 by the Allied Arts Co, (as was its neighbor at 1929 La Salle Ave), a prominent architecture firm responsible for many LA landmarks, including the recently restored Hall of Justice. A J Carlson was the contractor.

13 – Charles Kraft Residence – 1913 La Salle Ave – 1913 – Earl E Scherich

A more modest and later addition to the neighborhood, this 1913 Craftsman Bungalow was built for Charles Kraft, Vice-President of the J C Huggins Co, a brokerage and loan company. The home was designed by Architect Earl E Scherich, and May L Greenwood, builder.

14 – Roland Paul Residence Gates – 1986 W Washington Blvd – 1905 – Sumner P Hunt and Arthur Wesley Eager (Demolished)

Between a bicycle shop and a convalescence home are the gates to 1986 W Washington Blvd, which remain the only evidence that a home designed by Hunt & Eager once stood here. Originally commissioned by Mrs. R Fitzpatrick of Pico Blvd, in February of 1905, it was quickly turned over to pioneer Col Charles F Howland, who lived around the corner at 1902 S Harvard Blvd. He attempted to sell it in September, 1905, to Walter Rose, but the deal apparently fell through. In November, 1905, Col Howland successfully sold the home to Roland Paul.

15 – Elizabeth L Kenney Residence – 2012 W Washington Blvd – 1906 – Philip Gengembre Hubert (Attributed)

When this home was built, Philip Gengembre Hubert, celebrated New York City architect, was listed as the owner. It was most-likely designed by him on speculation. His residence was already established in 1903 at 2144 S Hobart Blvd. Hubert was responsible for designing many New York City landmarks, including the Chelsea Hotel, and after nearly 40 years in practice Hubert retired to Los Angeles, where he died in 1911. This home was sold to Elizabeth L Kenney, the second female to graduate the law department at Stanford University and continued her education at Northwestern University in Chicago. Kenney became the first practicing female attorney in Los Angeles in 1897, entering into practice with her uncle. The house, unfortunately, has been mistreated with a layer of stucco and aluminum windows. We can only hope evidence of the house’s original nature lies underneath.

16 – Commercial Block – 2034 W Washington Blvd (formerly the home of Nathaniel Dryden, 1902 S Harvard Blvd)

Evidence of how quickly Los Angeles was changing in the early 20th Century can be seen in this attractive commercial block. Nathaniel Dryden, an architect and engineer who built the Brand Library in Glendale and the Robinson Mansion in Beverly Hills, built his home on this corner in 1903. Just 20 years later it had been replaced by a commercial building already. Such was the value of land in the quick-growing city.

17 – Clara Pitt Durant Residence – 1909 S Harvard Blvd. 1908. Sumner P Hunt and Arthur Wesley Eager

Barely visible from the street, the current owners prefer to be hidden by the trees and shrubs. This large Craftsman home was designed by Hunt & Eager for Ms. Clara Pitt Durant. A divorcee from Michigan, Ms. Pitt took her settlement and began a new life in Los Angeles. The history of the house is recorded at: www.invisiblemanor.com

18 – Charles Clifford and Belle Case Gibbons Residence – 1915 S Oxford Ave – 1903 – Frank M Tyler.

This house, designed by Frank M Tyler, is unusual for the neighborhood because it is completely sheathed in shingles, including the front porch columns. It is a Transitional Victorian/Craftsman in the Shingle Style, with Colonial and Tudor touches. It was built for Charles Clifford Gibbons and Belle Case Gibbons, who came to Los Angeles in 1884. Mr. Gibbons worked his way to from stock boy to general manager of Hale’s Dry Goods Store. His employer, Jas M Hale was a relation of San Francisco’s Hale’s Bros. Department Store, the national chain. C C Gibbons died in 1910 after an illness and in 1912 the house was sold to Matt and Mary Conway. Matt Conway made his business in real estate and land speculation. Coincidentally, the third owner, Jon Fukuto, was also a proprietor of a chain of Los Angeles grocery stores call Jonson’s Supermarkets (the name being a play on words, combining “Jon” and “Sons”). In 1945, after being released from the Gila Internment Camp in Arizona, Mr. Fukuto moved his family to Los Angeles where he established the business.

Meet The Marching Bands Backstage – Patrick’s Day Parade (Dublin)
washington bands
Image by infomatique
Marching ensembles from around the globe provided the musical score for the festival parade on March 17th 2012.

Bands from Ireland, Northern Ireland, the United Kingdom and Russia will join U.S. bands from California, Georgia, Indiana, Missouri, North Carolina, Texas and Washington to march through the streets of the capital.

The following bands took part:
The White Russian Central Band (Russia)
Shorecrest Highlander Marching Band, Washington (USA)
Marvin Ridge High School Band, North Carolina (USA)
Clondalkin Youth Band, Dublin (Ireland)
John F. Kennedy High School (Shamrock Regiment), California (USA)
Berkner Bandolera Drill Team, Texas (USA)
Romford Drum & Trumpet Corps (UK)
Permian High School, Texas (USA)
Notre Dame, Indiana (USA)
Tri-County Marching Cavaliers Band, Indiana (USA)
Wildcats Marching Band, Georgia (USA)
University of Missouri, Missouri (USA)

Music | Posted by

Cool Washington Bands images

May 26th, 2016

A few nice washington bands images I found:

Meet The Marching Bands Backstage – Patrick’s Day Parade (Dublin)
washington bands
Image by infomatique
Marching ensembles from around the globe provided the musical score for the festival parade on March 17th 2012.

Bands from Ireland, Northern Ireland, the United Kingdom and Russia will join U.S. bands from California, Georgia, Indiana, Missouri, North Carolina, Texas and Washington to march through the streets of the capital.

The following bands took part:
The White Russian Central Band (Russia)
Shorecrest Highlander Marching Band, Washington (USA)
Marvin Ridge High School Band, North Carolina (USA)
Clondalkin Youth Band, Dublin (Ireland)
John F. Kennedy High School (Shamrock Regiment), California (USA)
Berkner Bandolera Drill Team, Texas (USA)
Romford Drum & Trumpet Corps (UK)
Permian High School, Texas (USA)
Notre Dame, Indiana (USA)
Tri-County Marching Cavaliers Band, Indiana (USA)
Wildcats Marching Band, Georgia (USA)
University of Missouri, Missouri (USA)

WSSU Cheerleaders
washington bands
Image by Kevin Coles

Howard University Oh La La Dancers
washington bands
Image by Kevin Coles

Music | Posted by Gertrude Brent

Cool Washington Bands images

May 21st, 2016

Some cool washington bands images:

Photos by Mike Washington Photography
washington bands
Image by rawartistsmedia
Photos by Mike Washington Photography

Wolf Hound
washington bands
Image by Photo Munki

Music | Posted by Victoria Addington

Nice Washington Bands photos

May 21st, 2016

Check out these washington bands images:

2013-07-26_0017yarrow_mahmout
washington bands
Image by lblanchard
Portrait of Yarrow Mamout (Muhammad Yaro)
Made in Georgetown, Washington, District of Columbia, United States, North and Central America, 1819
Charles Willson Peale, American, 1741 – 1827

Oil on canvas, 24 x 20 inches (61 x 50.8 cm
2011-87-1

Purchased with the gifts (by exchange) of R. Wistar Harvey, Mrs. T. Charlton Henry, R. Nelson Buckley, the estate of Rictavia Schiff, the Edith H. Bell fund, the McNeil Acquisition Fund for American Art and Material Culture, the Edward and Althea Budd Fund, and with funds from the proceeds of the sale of deaccessioned works of art, 2011

Yarrow Mamout, an African American Muslim who won his freedom from slavery, was reputedly 140 years old in 1819, when Charles Willson Peale painted this portrait for display in his Philadelphia Museum. Although Peale learned this was a miscalculation, the story of eighty-three-year-old Yarrow (c. 1736–1823), a native of the West African country of Guinea who was literate in Arabic, was still remarkable. As Peale noted, Yarrow was “comfortable in his Situation having Bank stock and [he] lives in his own house.”

A rare representation of ethnic and religious diversity in early America, and an outstanding example of Peale’s late naturalistic style, the picture is distinguished by the direct and sympathetic encounter between the artist and his subject and the skilled rendering of the details of physiognomy and age. Yarrow’s knit cap suggests a kufi, a hat traditionally worn by African Muslim men to assert their religion or African identity, but Peale artfully employs its yellow band to highlight his steady gaze with its glint of humor and wisdom.

Seventy-seven years old when he created this portrait, Peale was seeking a record of the personal traits that he believed supported a long life. In his writings and museum displays Peale celebrated making wise choices to maintain good health and a positive attitude, and he perceived Yarrow’s perseverance through his difficult life as a model of resourcefulness, industriousness, sobriety, and an unwillingness to become dispirited.

First Look: Collecting for Philadelphia
July 13, 2013 – September 8, 2013
Philadelphia Museum of Art

Rebirth Brass Band (by Jeffrey Dupuis) copy (1)
washington bands
Image by Visit Cape May
Annual Cape May Music Festival celebrates 26 years of music by the sea with brass band, Irish, classical and jazz

CAPE MAY — Come to Cape May and experience sweet sounds by the seaside during the 26th annual Cape May Music Festival, presented by the Mid-Atlantic Center for the Arts & Humanities (MAC), from Sunday, May 24 through Thursday, June 11.
The Cape May Music Festival offers something for every musical taste. In addition to Irish and brass band music, classical music lovers will welcome the return of the Bay-Atlantic Symphony, the New York Chamber Ensemble, and the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra Chamber Players. Enjoy the thrill of live jazz on an outdoor stage with the return of Jazz at the Estate, an exciting collaboration with Exit Zero Jazz Festival, as well as the ever-popular and meaningful 4th annual George Mesterhazy Tribute concert.
Opening the 26th Annual Cape May Music Festival on Sunday, May 24 at 8 p.m. is the 35-piece Atlantic Brass Band, a long time Cape May favorite, under the baton of Salvatore Scarpa. The Atlantic Brass Band returns to present a rousing concert of American music, perfect for a Memorial Day weekend celebration. Bring a lawn chair and enjoy a summer evening of traditional brass music by this award-winning ensemble. The concert is at Rotary Bandstand, Lafayette Street and Lyle Lane. Admission is free.
On Tuesday, May 26 at 8 p.m., The New York Chamber Ensemble performs “Perhaps a Butterfly: A Program on Jewish Themes,” at the Episcopal Church of the Advent, Washington and Franklin Streets, featuring Wonjung Kim, soprano. The concert presents Eliot Bailen’s beautiful and touching song settings of poems of children of Terezin, 1942-44, "Perhaps a Butterfly"; along with Aaron Copland’s As it Fell Upon a Day; Giacomo Meyerbeer ‘s Clarinet Quintet and Felix Mendelssohn’s String Quartet Op. 44 No. 2. General admission , Seniors , Students .
On Thursday, May 28, at 8 p.m., at Cape May Convention Hall, Beach Avenue at Stockton Place, hear The Brigadoons in a traditional Irish and Scottish music concert in a lively, toe-tapping and entertaining show of traditional Celtic music and dance. This concert is co-sponsored by MAC and the City of Cape May. Admission is free.
Join us on Saturday, May 30 from 11 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. for Jazz at the Estate, an open air event featuring five sets of live music all afternoon, food, beer, wine, spirits, crafts vendors and more, in collaboration with Exit Zero Jazz Festival. Headliner will be Grammy-award winners, The Rebirth Brass Band; along with the Dylan Reis Quartet, featuring Immanuel Wilkins; Melissa Aldana & Crash Trio; Joe Locke’s Love Is A Pendulum; and Charenee Wade. Admission in advance ( day of event) Adults, Children (ages 3-12).
On Tuesday, June 2, at 8 p.m., The New York Chamber Ensemble performs at the Episcopal Church of the Advent, 612 Franklin St. in a program entitled, “Winds of Cape May: Music for Winds and Piano," introducing guest pianist Rieko Aizawa. Looking back at the Cape May Music Festival’s beginnings, it brings back a rare program of chamber music gems for winds and piano: Saint-Saens’ Caprice; Beethoven’s Op. 16; and Poulenc’s Sextet. General admission , Seniors , Students .
On Thursday, June 4 at 8 p.m., the Bay-Atlantic Symphony returns to the First Presbyterian Church of Cape May, 500 Hughes St , with a program entitled “Marimba, Mountains and Mambo,” with Conductor Jed Gaylin and Makoto Nakura, on marimba, featuring Ney Rosauro’s Marimba Concerto No. 1, and Schubert’s Octet (arr for chamber orchestra). General admission is , seniors , and students .
On Sunday, June 7 at 8 p.m. come to Cape May Convention Hall to celebrate with friends and fans for the 4th Annual George Mesterhazy Tribute concert “Not Just Another Song and Dance.” The performance is an evening of selections from the Great American Songbook, under the direction of Barry Miles, featuring performances by some of George’s favorite colleagues. General admission is , Seniors , Students . Cape May Convention Hall, Beach Avenue at Stockton Place.
On Tuesday, June 9 at 8 p.m., New Jersey’s premiere chamber ensemble, the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra Chamber Players, return to the festival with their “Golden Age” string instruments for another program from the classical repertoire. Episcopal Church of the Advent, Washington and Franklin streets. General admission , Seniors , Students .
On Thursday, June 11 at 8 p.m. at the Episcopal Church of the Advent, 612 Franklin St., enjoy the New York Chamber Ensemble in a concert entitled, “Table d’hote: A Menu for Chamber Music Lovers.” Join us in this program that features Schubert’s timeless masterpiece, Cello Quintet in C Major, performed for the first time in Cape May, as well as Ferde Grofé’s Table d’hote for flute, violin and viola; and Boccherini’s Flute Quintet, G Major, flute and string quartet, Op. 17. This concert is dedicated to the memory of Mary Morris. General admission is , Seniors , Students .
In addition to these evening concerts, come to the Carriage House Café & Tearoom located on the beautiful grounds of the Emlen Physick Estate, 1048 Washington St. for Bach’s Lunches, mini-concerts by members of the Bay-Atlantic Symphony, where you can enjoy an elegant Tea Luncheon and intimate afternoon concert under the tent. Admission is per person. Bach’s Lunches are Wednesdays, May 27, June 3 and June 10 at 12:30 p.m.
The Cape May Music Festival is presented by the Mid-Atlantic Center for the Arts & Humanities (MAC) with funding by the New Jersey State Council on the Arts. For further information or to purchase tickets, call 609-884-5404 or order online at www.capemaymac.org. To purchase tickets for the June 7 Cape May Convention Hall concert, call 609-884-9565 or go online at www.discovercapemaynj.com.
The Mid-Atlantic Center for the Arts & Humanities (MAC) is a multifaceted not-for-profit organization committed to promoting the preservation, interpretation, and cultural enrichment of the Cape May region for its residents and visitors. MAC membership is open to all. For information about MAC’s year-round schedule of tours, festivals, and special events, call 609-884-5404 or 800-275-4278, or visit MAC’s Web site at www.capemaymac.org. For information about restaurants, accommodations and shopping, call the Chamber of Commerce of Greater Cape May at 609-884-5508. For information about historic accommodations, contact Cape May Historic Accommodations at www.capemaylodging.com.

2013 National Memorial Day Parade
washington bands
Image by Chase McAlpine
Thousands of DC Area residents and tourists gathered along Constitution Avenue in Washington, DC on Monday, May 27th, 2013 to watch the Annual National Memorial Day Parade.

Music | Posted by Fabrice Dollmach

Get the Best Deals on Wedding Diamond Bands

May 17th, 2016

Choosing the wedding diamond bands is definitely one of the most important items on the list of any future bride. Both the bride and the groom are expected to wear their diamond bands for the rest of their lives so you can understand why no one wants to just go out and buy the first items they come across. Nowadays, diamonds are really the nicest way to express your love for your special someone and when it comes to tying to knot, although there are other options, the best possible way is to go for gold bands that incorporate the finest quality gold and beautiful diamonds. Many people when hearing about diamond bands immediately think about items that cost a small fortune but the reality is that you can find just the right ones, regardless of what budget you may have and the secret lies in finding the right place to purchase your diamond bands.

Jewelry shops are really some of the most wide spread stores in most cities from around the world. Although you have quite a selection to choose from, you have to visit each and every one of them in order to find the best deal and this is really not a viable option for many couples. The solution is to do the same thing you do whenever you want to find and purchase a number of other products, and more specifically take your search on the internet. The internet is really the best place to start looking as you gain access to the products presented not only by websites in your country but also to the selection of items presented by online jewelers from all over the world. Most of these online jewelry shops welcome their customers with vast varieties of diamonds and gold bands designs, but many people also like to take price into consideration when making their choice. Don’t worry because all you need to do in order to find the perfect wedding bands is do a little research and find the best shops.

In terms of price, websites from South Africa definitely hold a big advantage and welcome all shoppers with some of the lowest prices available anywhere both on and off the internet for really simple gold bands or extremely intricate diamond bands. Apart from all this, sites such as diamondrings.co.za really make it easy for you to choose and purchase your diamond bands, or your simple gold bands, in no time at all, really. Also, the architectures of these websites make them really easy to operate even by complete beginners. Always a nice feature is the online selection tool that basically allows you to create your own gold bands in just seconds. The process goes pretty much like this. You find a website and start browsing through the various sections containing diamonds rings and bands. When you come across a nice set of gold bands that you really like, you can purchase it immediately. If you have any issues with the type or the size of the rock used, you can instantly choose another one from a list that is available for all diamond bands.

For more resources about diamond bands or about diamonds or even about gold bands, please review these links.

Music | Posted by Victoria Addington

Lastest Washington Bands News

May 15th, 2016

SHORECREST HIGH SCHOOL [ST. PATRICK’S PARADE IN DUBLIN 2016]-112294
washington bands
Image by infomatique
Apologies to those of you who have no interested in St. Patrick’s Day but I am about to upload many photographs of the St. Patrick’s Day Parade in Dublin. I will begin with photographs of Shorecrest High School and over the next few days I will upload photographs of other bands and pageant groups. I selected Shorecrest because they are a favourite of mine.

I had a few problems this year [1] The organisers had in the past provided two buses as platforms for the media and this year they also supplied buses but one was for international media and the other was for local media. The bus that I was assigned was badly located because multiple street signs obstructed the view to a unacceptable extent and the result was that I had to shoot at an unsuitable angle or crop my photographs to an unacceptable degree [many of the photographers were really annoyed however as I am a street photographer rather than a professional I was not especially annoyed and I can’t really complain] [2] I used a camera/lens combination that I had not used before and this also impacted on my photographs especially as some were out of focus. [3] I was suffering from a really bad cold [that’s life, is it not].

The good news is that the weather was excellent and the parade was interesting and I enjoyed. After the parade I had an excellent lunch at Hanoi Hanoi and the owner supplied me with a special treat to cheer me up … thanks!

Music | Posted by

Cool Washington Bands images

May 9th, 2016

Check out these washington bands images:

Valley View Restaurant (1)
washington bands
Image by D.Clow – Maryland
View behind the restaurant.

Friday
Entry One

Flew out of work, the fleet flight of Friday before a holiday weekend. Everyone cracks a smile upon stepping out of the concrete and glass coffin of the corporate work week. The motorcycle is quickly gassed and loaded, I leave Washington DC at three-thirty, vowing not to check the time for the rest of the adventure. Adventure, the American adventure of the open road is what I seek. The road, my cameras, and escape.

Right turn off of 15th St. NW and I’m motoring past the Washington Monument and the White House. Harleys and clones are already lining the Mall for the annual Memorial remembrance that is Rolling Thunder. I’m soon over the bridge and on I-66 west. I plan on avoiding major highways when at all possible. Preferring scenic byways to drab highways. 66 is a necessary evil to flee the DC metro area as quickly as possible. At the start, 66 is a good quick run, for awhile anyway. Loads of Rolling Thunder riders are heading in 66 eastbound.

I keep the ubiquitous two fingers down to the side salute to fellow bikers out for extended stretches of time. In my experience, HD guys return the acknowledgement about 30-40% of the time. No big deal, some animosity exist though between different bike cultures. Motor-ism two-wheel stereotypes. However with the Rolling Thunder guys there is a noticeable increase in response, perhaps due to no longer just one biker acknowledging another, but a patriotic sharing of support and remembrance for those left behind, POW-MIA.

Traffic worsens further out 66 and I come up on a full HD dresser. Screaming Eagle back patch worked in with POW-MIA covers his vest and is topped by a “Run for the Wall” patch. I keep back a pace and we adopt the natural offset positioning of multiple riders.

After some 66 backup, stop-and-go, we strike up a staccato conversation in the pauses of the traffic flow. Where you been, where you going, see the rain coming? I tell him I’m headed out to the mountains, Skyline Drive and West Virginia. He says he’s just in from there recently, was in DC for Rolling Thunder for the day and will be coming back in on Sunday again. His license plate is obscured by luggage, so I’m unsure of his port of origin.

Later on we part ways and my thoughts turn. Of my parents friends only my step-dad was drafted for Vietnam. Luckily, for us, he only went as far as Ft. Hood, TX, and came back with some good stories about army life and venturing into Mexico (at least the ones he’s shared with me). I think about all the life he’s lived since then, all his experiences and joys. Thinking about what all those who didn’t return gave up, lost, when they didn’t come home. The loss felt by those who loved them, families that have a name on the Wall.

Rain is sprinkling before Manassas. Enough to cool you off but not enough to get you worried yet, at least for a bit. Whooooo. Then come the big drops. I head off the ramp to gear up with the rain paraphernalia under the gas station pavilion. Finally get it all on and get strapped back up and out pops the sun and the rain stops. Too funny. Now I have wet clothes on under the raingear. Rain gear now keeping the wind out that would dry me. I motor on as more rain is promised on the horizon.

This brings up a point about rain. People always ask, “What do you do when it rains and your on the motorcycle”. I reply simply, “I get wet”. Duh. Rain riding has never bothered me. On the straight highways it’s no big deal. Just give more cushion to the cars in front of you. Drive like grandma on the exit ramps.

My turning point is finally reached. Off of 66 west and onto 647, Crest Hill Rd. at The Plains, VA. Crest Hill Road is my first slice of motorcycle heaven to be had this weekend. I’m delighted to find that the squiggly line I traced out on the map when planning this trip has translated so well in reality. The road is still wet from the passing rain clouds, and I give a small rabbit and then a chipmunk a near death experience. My first of many animal crossings this weekend. The road is fantastic. A mixture of hilltop road and tree lined canopies that create forest tunnels. Speed limit is 45mph, 55-60 feels comfortable on most parts. Keeping an eye out for a hilltop barn to photograph that I’ve seen in my minds eye, lit by the sun breaking through the clouds and backed by the mountain vista. No luck on any of the barns actual placement to fit the mental picture I have framed.

Crest Hill Road and Fodderstack Rd is a long stretch. I take shots of a church and other buildings along Zachary Taylor Highway. Fodderstack gives more of the same as Crest Hill, just a narrower road. The asphalt is of my favorite variety, freshly laid. Washington, VA is a tiny town of historic bed and breakfasts. Local wineries appear to be an attraction here too. Right after Washington the rain returns while I’m in route to Sperryville. Then it really starts to come down, a full on summer thunderstorm. Visibility is down. Road and parking lots soon resemble rivers. Rain drops of the monster variety explode on the pavement, and you know it hurts when they hit you.

I quick soaking circuit of Sperryville confirms there are no local hotels. I duck into a barn shaped restaurant to wait it out. My drenched gear takes on bar stool and I occupy another. There’s a few flying pigs about. The bartender get me a hefeweizen, and recommends the angus burger. Locally raised and grass fed, we exchange jokes about my passing the burgers relatives on the way in.

Don’t freak about the beer. I have a one only rule when riding. It was followed by a meal (best burger of the weekend!), several coffees, and this bar top journal entry.

Somewhere along Crest Hill road I decided to keep the cell off for the weekend. In addition no tv, newspapers, internet, or e-mail sound like a good idea. Of course I now am studiously avoid eye contact with the two beautiful plasma’s above the bar.

Entry Two

Hazel River Inn, Culpepper, VA, has the coolest street side seating in town.

The downpour let up at the Shady Farms bar in Sperryville and due to the deficiency in local lodging I quiz the bartender for options. Over the other side of the mountain, the opposite side of Skyline Dr via 211 is Luray with lots of motels, but I want to save the mountain for the morning. The waitress suggest Culpepper, there being a Holiday Inn etc.

Stepping outside the sun has broke through the clouds again. Enough for some shots of Shady Farms Restaurant and a bridge. Heading down 522, the Sperryville Pike, I keep an eye out for photo ops to catch the next morning as I’ll be rerouting back through. Following the mantra of Dale Borgeson about tour riding in the US, I aim to avoid large chain establishments, whether they are restaurants or hotels, and explore the mom-and-pop local variety businesses. I have a dive-ish roadside motel in mind, Culpepper comes through with the Sleepy Hollow Hotel.

Before check in I ride through downtown historic Culpepper. It’s a cool place. The Shady Farm bartender had recommended the Culpepper Thai restaurant. I see it but don’t visit, still full from the meal earlier. Cameron Street Coffee looks like a great place, located in an old warehouse. Unfortunately their closed for the night.

Shower and changed, room 102 at the Sleepy Hollow Hotel. I hop back on the bike, refreshed and dry and ride through the warm night air back downtown. The coffee at the Hazel River Inn comes with a sweet fudge confection on the side. The peach and blackberry cobbler with vanilla sauce is divine.

The reconfigured plan for this getaway is to shed. Shed worries about the job, career, housing, and relationships. My motorcycle is therapeutic. It’s 600cc’s of Zoloft on two wheels. The road lifts my spirits. This wasn’t supposed to be a solo run, and there are stretches of road where I feel the emptiness behind me.

The cobbler is finished and I can hear the sound of a band doing their sound check. The banging of the drum requires investigation.

Entry Three

I found Brown Bag Special in the cellar pub of the same restaurant I was in. On my way to the door the noise of the sound check floated up the stairs and directed my feet downward. Brown Bag Special opened the set, appropriately enough, with “I drink alone”. The ol’ man, Big Money, would have loved it. Drink alone started off a Big Money Blues trifecta to include “The Breeze” and “Mustang Sally”. Then they made the mistake a lot of bands make that have a great lead guitar player. They let him sing. The lead guitarist karaoke sucked his way through a Tom Petty hit. He was so off key in his singing it made you appreciate the guitar solo’s all the more for the relief they provided. Thankfully the regular singer soon resumed his duties and the night went on. More good stuff from the band.

Freebird
Folsom Prison Blues
Cheap Sun Glasses

“can’t you see, can’t you see, what that woman, what she’s done to me”

Off to bed now at the Sleepy Hollow Hotel with the ghost and shades of dead hookers and overdoses past.

150 miles today.

Saturday

Entry Four

Morning breaks on the Sleepy Hollow Hotel, a hot shower and I’m back on the bike. A quick stop downtown to shoot the Hazel Inn, then it’s back on the Sperryville Pike. More stops to capture some sights seen yesterday. Mr. & Mrs. Pump. The open mouth caricatures are an accurate representation of the current gas cost and the pumps eating your wallet.

I keep telling my daughter that her first car, college car, will be a hybrid. She thinks they are ugly. The bike isn’t so bad, averaging around 40mpg. At about 180 miles on the tripometer I start to look for a refill, although I’ve pushed it to 211 miles before.

A quick left in Sperryville on 211 and up into the mountain, Blue Ridge Mountains and Skyline Drive. Heading up the mountain I get the first bite of the twisties I’ve been craving. The fee at the gate to Skyline Drive is well worth the price. Great scenery and fantastic views. The only drawback is the 35mph speed limit that is well enforced by the park rangers.

I shoot some self-portraits at Pollock Knob overlook. They’re funny in that with all the scrambling and hurrying to be the camera timer, then trying to effect a relaxed pose. I’ve also broke out my old friend this trip, the Lubitel 166, a medium format, 120mm film, twin lens camera. I’m like Jay-Z with this camera, I have to get it in one take. There is no digital review after the click for instant gratification. As a fellow photographer it’s “Point, Push, and Pray”. I’ll be interested to see the results. Not that I’ve left digital behind. Carrying both cameras, I’m an analog/digital double threat.

After the self-portraits and some dead tree shots I’m about to pack back on the bike and leave when I meet the preacher and his wife. He offers to shoot me with my camera and I return the favor with theirs. Conversation flows and in a ‘small world’ moment it turns out that he works for same Hazel family that owns the restaurant I was at last night for his Monday thru Friday job. I get a friendly “God bless” and I’m heading south on Skyline Drive. I make several more stops and break out the cameras again at Big Meadow.

There is a gnarly dead tree in the middle of the meadow. It has burn damage at the base, either the result of some wild fire or perhaps a controlled burn done to maintain the field. I spot and shoot a few deer, they probably won’t turn out as they’re to far away for my lens on the D100. I shoot a bunch of shots of the tree with the D100 and then totally switch processes with the Lubitel. The picture setup with the Lubitel takes about a minute-and-a-half. Manual zoom, i.e., walking back and forth to get the framing I want. Light meter reading. Then dealing with the reversed optics of the look-down box camera. It is fun though, to switch it up, change the pace and the dynamics. Just one click though, hope I caught it.

It’s a long but enjoyable ride to the south end of Skyline Drive. Unless you really like slow cruising I would suggest picking which third of Skyline Drive you’d like include in your trip and leave the rest. I drop off the mountain and into Waynesboro. Finding Mad Anthony’s coffee shop for a late breakfast. I overhear that it’s around noon. The Italian Roast coffee is good, in fact, it would prove to be the best coffee of the trip.

One of the pleasures of traveling by motorcycle is that it’s an easy conversation starter. People ask you where your coming from, where you’re heading, ask about your bike, tell you’re about their bike or the one they wish they had. One of the peculiarities of these conversations is that if the person even remotely knows of anyone that has died on a motorcycle, they will be sure to share this fact along with details. These stories usually involve a deer, a car pulling out, or someone taking a corner to fast. The conversation goes something like this:

Stranger“nice bike”
You“thanks”
Stranger“my cousin Bob had a friend that hit a deer and died on his bike”

Short silence.

You“yeah, deer are dangerous, got to be careful”

I’m not exaggerating when I say I’ve held variations on this conversation many times. Luckily this isn’t the conversation I have with the owner of Mad Anthony’s. He’s a former sailboat instructor who now finds the same release and head clearing on his motorcycle that he used to get from his sailboat.

This brings to mind the same wave – don’t way dynamic that occurs between sail boaters and power boaters, very similar to the sportbike & HD crowd.

The proprietor is a coffee guru, we discuss roasting (my Italian roast was just roasted Wednesday this week). We talk about the good and the evil of Starbucks. We’re both in agreement that they over roast their regular coffee, but I think their foo foo drinks are tasty. He has in his shop both the Bodum press and the Bodum vacuum coffee pot that I got my mom for x-mas. A shameless plug here, the Bodum vacuum coffee pot makes the best home coffee ever. It’s also an entertaining crowd pleaser, no joke.

Leaving Waynesboro the plan was 340 northward to 33, then into Harrisonburg, VA (home of the Valley Mall and JMU). 340 proved to be boring so I jumped on 256, Port Republic Road, for a better ride to Harrisonburg. I don’t know if the coffee wore off or if I was just worn out. I pull over at Westover Park, pick out a spot of grass, and take a good nap in the sun.

I had my motorcycle bug handed down to me by my step-dad. My kindergarten year of school we moved right at the end of the school year. Rather than switch schools at this inopportune time my Dad stuck me on the back of his Honda and rode me to school and back again for the last month or two. Even earlier than that I have a great photo of me in 1973-4 sitting on his chopper with him. Me in a diaper and him with his long hippy hair. The wild side of the Reverend indeed.

Refreshed from my nap it’s back on 33 westbound. Heading out of the Shenandoah Valley and Rockingham County is more glorious twisty roads and the George Washington National Forest. GW is a beautiful tree canopy lined road with a river off to one side. Franklin, WV is the destination, a return to the Star Hotel.

I stayed at the Star a few years prior when they first re-opened the historic Star Hotel. The owner, Steve Miller, is a great guy, friendly and conversational. I told him I’d be back again, but it’s been a few more years than I thought. Late lunch at the Star is pesto grilled chicken on ciabatta bread with roasted red peppers. Not the type of fare one might associate with West Virginia, but people have misperceptions about everywhere. Steve promises a prime rib later at dinner tonight to die for.

So that there is no misunderstanding, in as much as the Sleepy Hollow Hotel was a dive, the Star Hotel is a dream.

Dump the gear in the room back on the bike for some roaming around. I head back to explore a river road I passed on the way in, Rock Gap. It’s a gravel affair and I follow it back a little ways. Photo some river shots. Down further there is a large cliff face with some college aged kids de-gearing after a day of climbing. I’ll try to stop back in tomorrow and shoot some climbing action, as well as some fly fishing.

I pick up a bottle of Barefoot Wine, Cabernet Sauvignon, and drop it off with Steve at the Star to keep for later. I’ll enjoy that bottle later tonight from the 3rd floor front porch. South out of town I head, into some very secondary roads. I shoot an old decrepit cabin that would be right up Bobby Sargent’s alley. I put it in the metal folder for a possible future model shoot location, along with the river spots I’ve seen.

There are a couple more stops on this little ride. Once for what appears to be a feral chicken, and then for middle of the road stare down with a young doe. She’s camera shy though and is off before I can get a shot. Sportbike probably isn’t the best conveyance for nature photography. The pavement stops and gravel begins, I motor on. Rick & I once spent a full day just about on gravel roads, crisscrossing the back country around Cumberland, MD. So I’m comfortable with the less than ideal riding surface. A few miles on the road dead ends at a pair of chicken houses (source of the feral chicken’s ancestors perhaps?) and I turn around and survey the valley I’ve just ridden through. I have to stop the bike and soak in the scene. A picturesque farm is nestled in the corner of the valley, up against the hills. I meet some inquisitive cows, along with the farmer and his wife.

It seems that when you are in WV and you pass a sign that says “snow removal ends here” that the already suspect road conditions are going to quickly deteriorate and will soon resemble somewhat more of a logging road. I motor on through some back country, no houses, no farms, just mountains, steep roadside cliffs, and wicked gravel switchback curves. The part that gives you the willies are the downhill corners where the road grade is slanted to the outside of the curve and to the drop below. Yikes!

I creep along where a four wheeler would be much more functional. Although I still hit it a bit in the straights. Pavement arrives again and I’m unsure of my exact location. I follow the chicken farmers directions and soon discover myself back in Brandywine, intersecting the same stretch of 33 I rode on my way into Franklin.

Back at the Star Hotel it’s a shower and fresh clothes before heading down for dinner. Downstairs I find the prime rib to be as good as promised.

Entry Five

How beautifully staged is this. Barefoot on the 3rd floor patio, wine to ease the back and the ache in the knee.

205 miles today, the last 30 after check in, just to explore.

Sunday

Entry Six

Out early in the morning. I find no climbers at Rock Gap, unsure of the hours they keep. Out of Franklin on 33 west, looking for another squiggly line I had seen on a map. Bland Hill Road name is a misnomer. A single lane country road winding through German Valley. I got a few shots of German Valley from the 33 overlook before turning on Bland Hill. Now I find myself in the same location I had shot from above.

The road cuts through some open pasture land and I meet some cows standing in the road after rounding one bend. They’re pleasant enough, if in no particular hurry to cross, and don’t mind posing for a shot or two before meandering on. People talk about the danger of hitting a deer, a cow would really ruin your day! Off of Bland Hill and on down into the valley. I come up on the rock formation I had seen from the overlook previously. It’s not Seneca Rocks, but a formation of the same ilk. I get some more photos, then onto German Valley Road. I’m still staying at the Star, there is no real destination today. It’s relaxing to stop as much as I like.

German Valley Road puts me back on 33 west and not long after I’m ordering breakfast at the Valley View Restaurant. Dale Borgeson warns of places that advertise home cooking, but that’s about all you see in these parts. There are a fair number of cars here and that’s usually a good since the food will be alright. Hell, even the Army could make a good breakfast. It all works out and it’s a hell of a deal, for toast, two eggs, hash browns, bacon, and coffee.

From 33 I hit 28 and turn off on Smoke Hole Road, just because it’s there and looks interesting. Boy, what a find it is. Combining the curvy one lane country road with nice wide smooth pavement (gravel free in the corners). It’s great. Smoke Hole Road turns out to run from 28 across the Seneca Rocks National Forest to 220 on the other side. Going west-to-east it starts out all curves and hills, then ends by winding along the south branch of the Potomac. There are lots of fly fishermen here enjoying the catch-and-release section of the river.

Up 220 to Petersburg, I run into some Ducati guys at the gas station. We swap riding info and I’m soon on 42 north towards Mayville. Hanging a left when I see a sign for Dolly Sods. I’m back on secondary roads and I soon pass another prophetic ‘no snow removal’ signs. It’s gravel the rest of the way up the mountain til it breaks out on top at Dolly Sod.

I’m real happy with today’s roads, as both Smoke Hole Road and Dolly Sods were unplanned ‘discovered adventures’. I do some rock scrabbling at Dolly Sod and enjoy the cliff top views. A fellow tourist snaps a shot for me an I hike out well past the distance that the casual tourist and families go. Shot some more shots of the rock formations with both the digital and film camera. Do some more self-portraits. I then sit down to relax in the sun with the cliff side breeze steadily blowing and update this journal.

Entry Seven

Well, fellow traveler, if you’ve made it this far I am duly impressed. I thank you for your perseverance. The rest of the day was spent riding without incident. Just more fantastic roads. You don’t have to be an explore on par with Lewis & Clark to find great rides in West Virginia. Just be curious in nature and unafraid to leave the beaten path. Drop off the numbered roads and take the route less traveled. Soon you’ll be in your own undiscovered country. Blah blah blah.

Out of Dolly Sod and I find myself on 32. Rough calculations put the dirt road travel around 25 miles for the day. While we are on stats, here’s today’s animal road count:

1 rooster
1 dead fox
2 cows
8 chipmunks
7 alive
1 dead
3 dead possums
1 squirrel
1 dead blob (undistinguishable)
No fearsome deer
1 dog

I guided myself today by a rather non-descript map put out by mountainhighlands.com

Leaving Dolly Sod on 32 puts me in Dry Fork and back on familiar 33 west to Elkins. I cruise around Elkins on the off chance I’ll run into a guy I know named Dallas. Now all you need to know about Dallas is the following:

I don’t know his last name
I once gave him a hair cut with dog grooming clippers
I know he works at a bike shop making choppers

You figure the odds of me finding him, near zero.

If your curious it wasn’t the first time I cut hair, albeit the first time using dog shears. In Korea I cut in the latrine for a cut or for a 6 pack. Everything was barter in the Army. We had a cook that would make you a great custom birthday cake for a case of beer or feed you food out of the back of the chow hall at 3am when you staggered in drunk from the ville for the promise of a future round to be bought. Korea stories could fill another journal.

Anyway, out of Elkins and south to Beverly. Scott, if your reading this you were on my mind as I went through town, never forgive, never forget.

So far I’ve only tried to write about the positive food experiences of the trip without throwing anyplace under the bus. C&J in Beverly however, served only barely functional burgers and the vanilla shake was of the worst chemical prefab variety. There are some things that I am stuck on, good vanilla ice cream is one. The others that I’m picky about are beer, whiskey, steak, cheese-steak, and coffee. It’s just so disappointing when something you usually enjoy turns out to be sub par.

After C&J it’s 250 east to 28, which heads back towards Seneca Rocks and Franklin. It’s a good haul through the Monongahela National Forest. A road of the scenic variety, with good twisties up the mountain and through the scenery. These type road have become quite a common occurrence here in WV. Back in Seneca Rocks and 33 east into Franklin. I never shoot Seneca Rocks, the light is never right, number one can tell you how I get about my light.

The Star’s restaurant is closed on Sunday, dagger, so I shower and head into Franklin by foot. About Franklin, WV. It’s a nice little town, quiet and sleepy. No bars other than the VFW that I could see. Everybody I’ve met and spoken too has be pleasant, friendly and conversational, both here in Franklin and elsewhere in WV. I’m sure there are a variety of characters much as anywhere, this is just my observation from the tourist level.

Following last night precedent I grab another vino from the Shell station. The Star being closed is a dilemma; I’m in need of a cork screw (having borrowed the restaurants the night before). I wander back down to the hotel, wine in hand, and past the hotel just a bit til I meet an old man sitting out front. I explain my situation, wine without access, and he says he’ll sell me a corkscrew. He goes in the house, shortly to return with the necessary implement in hand. I figure I have it for -4 or maybe rent it for a one time use for . That proves unnecessary however, he says just to take it, and keep it for any future need.

The sole booking for the hotel tonight, I’m like a wraith as I glide through the halls. On the front porch with my bottle of vino in hand. I have some cheap cigars I also picked up and there’s nothing to do but kick back and watch the sunset.

It’s been a great trip. Somewhat lonesome at times. The lack of someone to talk to surely let to the length of this journal. It was a trip to getaway, to reflect. There was no great revelation or anything, just time to get to know yourself. The road gives you time to think. I know who I am and I like being me. I know what’s missing.

I’m resolved to take more bike trips in the future. It’s definitely my preferred way to travel and vacation. Motorcycling is the way to go.

Tomorrow I have my route generally planned out, more scenic byways for a winding route home.

Miles today, 240.

Monday

Entry Seven

Just a short postscript. 20 miles east of Washington DC, on 66, the chain popped off the bike. It’s never easy.

2009 08 01 – 8114 – Washington DC – 930 Club – Xavier Rudd
washington bands
Image by thisisbossi
Xavier Rudd was phenomenal: the best concert I’ve been to at the 9:30 Club, and very likely in the running (and perhaps winner) of the best concert I’ve ever been to… ever.

I never heard of Xavier Rudd until about a month before the concert, when my friend Lindsey sent me a link to a Youtube video & asked if I wanted to go. The sound of the didgeridoos w/ a rock ensemble instantly grabbed my attention, so I readily said "yes".

Xavier is a relaxed guy… he’s so peaceful, and his charisma grabs at the audience — drawing them right into every song. His talent is tough to equate: he swapped instruments every song, and I was impressed with how — in the same song: he could play a guitar, play percussion, sing vocals, and blow into the didge. Bravo.

The two others on stage — one on drums and one on bass — both had distinct personalities; and both frequently emerging from their background positions (if ever it could be said they were much more background than Xavier was). It’s rare to see bassists stay in the spotlight: but this bassist was on center stage the whole show.

Even the stagehand joined on banjo at one point, and dagnabit he was good… if only they put some more light on him & gave him a little more airtime. It’s not often a stagehand has his own stagehand.

When I saw the Disco Biscuits back on 4/20: the show was stellar, but the crowd was disappointing. Granted, I’m straight edge… so I don’t smoke nor drink… so yeah, I was well aware that I was seeing a pot band on April 20th. Nonetheless, the crowd was downright obnoxious and ruined what could’ve otherwise been a great show. Here with Xavier Rudd, however: the crowd was by and large coherent and able to leap about, scream, and throw up their arms without spilling their drinks all over the place or falling into everyone around them.

One exception was during the last two songs, when in separate events the girl behind me dropped her beer on me… and then the girls in front of me rushed the stage — causing every other woman in the front to also rush; and women further back to make an attempt. One girl on stage may or may not have been aware that she was falling out of her dress in front of everyone. The woman that ended up in front of me — almost separating me from Lindsey & successfully separating a nearby couple — got to experience my "OMG I’M A DRUNK FANBOY LOLZ" personality, which is amazing at getting annoying people away from me. She got out of there in about a minute.

I’ve gone from having never heard of Xavier Rudd to joining every social networking outlet he has… now I’m holding my breath for when he returns, and I have a newfound desire to pick up a didgeridoo during my trek to Oceania this winter.

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Influential singers and bands in music history

May 1st, 2016

There are many singers and bands which disappear as quickly as they rise each year. However, some still remain in the fans’ heart for their eye-catching appearance and vocal ability, with a large number of albums sold.

 

Michael Jackson, the King of Pop, is recognized as the greatest, most successful and influential entertainers of all time. He became a global figure in popular cultures for his contribution to music, dance, and fashion. He achieved 13 Grammy Awards and the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Awards. The King of Pop was notable for his donations of millions of dollars to support more than 39 charities. “Thriller”, “Beat It”, “Billie Jean”, “Man in the Mirror”, “Smooth Criminal”, and “Rock With You” are just some among his famous songs.

 

Michael Jackson, the King of Pop

 

 

The Beatles, an English rock band, is one of the most commercially successful in the history of popular music. There are four members including John Lennon (rhythm guitar), Ringo Starr (drums), Paul McCartney (basic guitar), and George Harrison (lead guitar). The group came to be perceived as the embodiment of progressive ideals. The band was in the Billboard’s list of the all-time top selling Hot 100 artists in 2008 and Time magazine’s compilation of the 20the century’s 100 most important and influential people.

 

In the United States, the Beatles was awarded 6 Diamond albums, 39 Platinum albums, 24 Multi-Platinum albums, and 45 Gold albums.

 

ABBA became one of the most commercially successful bands in the history of popular music as well as one of the world’s best selling bands, having sold more than 375 million records globally. Their success was widespread from English-speaking countries like the United States, Ireland, and the United Kingdom to non English speaking countries.

 

ABBA became one of the most commercially successful bands in the history of popular music

 

 

Elvis Presley was considered as one of the most popular and important American singers of the 20the century and referred to as the “King of Rock and Roll”. He is the best-selling solo artists in the history of popular music, winning Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award at the age of 36. His well-known songs consist of Loving You, One Night, It’s “Now or Never”, “Return to Sender”, and “Good Luck Charm”.

 

the “King of Rock and Roll”

 

The Rolling Stones, an English rock band, has released 22 studio albums in the UK. They appeared in the Billboard’s list of Hot 100 Top All-Time Artists and the second most successful group in the Billboard Hot 100 chart. Their famous songs include Paint It Black, Sympathy for the Devil, You Can’t Always Get What You Want, Start Me Up, and Satisfaction.

 

They appeared in the Billboard’s list of Hot 100 Top All-Time Artists

 

Queen was one of the most commercially successful musical acts of all times. The band was ranked #28 in The 100 Greatest British Rock Albums Ever.

 

Queen was one of the most commercially successful musical acts of all times.

 

 

Related links:

Successful and influential female singers

Top Great Singers of All Times

Top Sexiest female singer

I am an internet marketer and freelance photographer. I maintain various sites and blogs with a large audience. My hobby is collecting photographs of celebrities and writing comments on outstanding events in the field of entertainment.

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