Posts Tagged ‘Chamber’

Fortas Chamber Music Concerts: Leonidas Kavakos, violin, with Christoph Eschenbach, piano

February 6th, 2015

Fortas Chamber Music Concerts: Leonidas Kavakos, violin, with Christoph Eschenbach, piano
Event on 2015-05-11 19:30:00

Grammy-nominated violinist Leonidas Kavakos and pianist Christoph Eschenbach come together for a romantic night included in a residency during the Kennedy Center which Kavakos additionally both conducts and performs with the National Symphony Orchestra.

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Leonidas Kavakos, violin
"A stunning violinist [who] impressed with his technical security and a great presence of sound"
The Boston Globe
with
Christoph Eschenbach, piano
"A brilliant solo pianist…particularly attuned to emotional expression"
–The New York Times
 
Grammy Award(r) nominee Leonidas Kavakos is recognized across the world as a violinist and artist of rare quality, acclaimed for his virtuosity, superb musicianship and the integrity of his playing. Kavakos comes together with pianist Christoph Eschenbach, Music Director for the Kennedy Center and nationwide Symphony Orchestra, for a romantic evening as an element of a residency on Kennedy Center where he both conducts and plays with the National Symphony Orchestra.

The main Leonidas Kavakos Residency. Repertoire with this system is established later on.

at Kennedy Center Terrace Theater
2700 F Street NW
Washington, United States


FMBoston.com

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Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center

October 13th, 2014

Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center
Occasion on 2014-11-20 00:00:00
Location: Schwab Auditorium
Members associated with venerable Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center go back to Schwab Auditorium the very first time since 2011. This system features music by Mozart and includes Sebastian Currier's Parallel Worlds, a 2013 work with flute, two violins, viola, and cello co-commissioned by the Center the Performing Arts at Penn State through its membership within the nationwide traditional music-commissioning consortium Music Accord. Currier, who had been born in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, is a 2007 recipient associated with the prestigious Grawemeyer Award. Heralded as "music with an exceptional voice" by a New York instances critic and also as "lyrical, colorful, firmly rooted in tradition but positively new" by a Washington Post reviewer, Currier compositions are performed at major venues all over the world by acclaimed musicians and orchestras. The program also includes three Mozart pieces written inside 1780s: Quartet in an important, K. 298, for flute, violin, viola, and cello; Duo #2 in B-flat significant, K. 424, for violin and viola; and Quintet in A Major, K. 581, for clarinet, two violins, viola, and cello. The concert features seven musicians-flutist Tara Helen O'Connor, clarinetist David Shifrin, violinists Ani Kavafian and Arnaud Sussman, violists Yura Lee and Paul Neubauer, and cellist Mihai Marica-selected from the Chamber Music Society's roster of virtuosos. The multigenerational performers regarding the Chamber Music community, certainly one of eleven constituents regarding the largest performing arts complex in the world, perform in nyc at Alice Tully Hall as well as on trips throughout the world. The society's performers also perform regarding PBS series reside From Lincoln Center and United states Public Media's Performance Today.

Tickets:
Adult
University Park Student
18 and young
http://cpa.psu.edu/tickets

Artistic Viewpoints
6:30 pm Thursday, November 20, 2014

Schwab Auditorium

Artistic Viewpoints, an informal moderated discussion featuring a visiting musician, is offered in Schwab Auditorium one hour before the performance and is free for ticket holders.
Violin Master Class

at Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts
3680 Walnut St.
Philadelphia, United States

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Boston Symphony Chamber Players with pianist Emanuel Ax

July 22nd, 2014

Boston Symphony Chamber Players with pianist Emanuel Ax
Event on 2015-03-01 15:00:00

Pianist Emanuel Ax joins the Chamber Players on Sunday, March 15 for a program centered on the music of Robert Schumann and György Kurtág (himself a noted admirer of Schumann's music and one of the great chamber music coaches in the world today). The program begins with two works by Schumann written in 1849: first, his Fantasy Pieces for clarinet and piano, written over the course of two days; and the Adagio and Allegro for horn and piano, written over four days and one of the composer's most popular chamber works, composed for the then-recently invented valved horn. The centerpiece of the concert will be Kurtág's melancholic song cycle, Scenes from a Novel for soprano and ensemble, composed in 1982 and setting texts by Russian writer Rimma Dalos. Kurtág's brief, eight-movement Wind Quintet, Op. 2 is a Webern-influenced delicacy of intimate colors. Closing the program is another work featuring Mr. Ax, Schumann's exuberant Piano Quintet in E-flat, one of the masterpieces of the genre. View biography in full page >

Born in Lvov, Poland, Emanuel Ax moved to Winnipeg, Canada, with his family when he was a young boy. His studies at the Juilliard School were supported by the sponsorship of the Epstein Scholarship Program of the Boys Clubs of America, and he subsequently won the Young Concert Artists Award. Additionally, he attended Columbia University, where he majored in French. Mr. Ax captured public attention in 1974 when he won the first Arthur Rubinstein International Piano Competition in Tel Aviv. In 1975 he won the Michaels Award of Young Concert Artists followed four years later by the coveted Avery Fisher Prize.

The 2013/14 season begins with appearances at the Barbican Centre followed by Lincoln Center with the London Symphony Orchestra conducted by Bernard Haitink as well as collaborations with the Concertgebouworkester and Mariss Jansons in Amsterdam, Bucharest, China and Japan during their world-wide centenary celebrations. The second half of the season sees the realization of a project inspired by Brahms which includes new pieces from composers Missy Mazzoli, Nico Muhly, Brett Dean and Anders Hillborg all producing works linked to Brahms commissioned jointly between the Los Angeles Philharmonic, Cal Performances Berkeley, Chicago Symphony and Carnegie Hall with the participation of collaborators Anne-Sophie von Otter and Yo-Yo Ma. To conclude the season, he will travel to Hong Kong and Australia for a complete cycle of Beethoven concerti with incoming Chief Conductor David Roberston in Sydney and with Sir Andrew Davis in Melbourne.

In conjunction with his multiple weeks as Artist in Residence with the New York Philharmonic during the 2012/13 season, Sony Classical released his latest recital disc of works from Haydn to Schumann to Copland reflecting their different uses of the "Variation" concept. In the spring he joined that orchestra on their European tour conducted by Alan Gilbert. He returned to the orchestras in Los Angeles, St. Louis, Atlanta, Detroit, Washington, and Pittsburgh where he is a beloved regular.Born in Lvov, Poland, Emanuel Ax moved to Winnipeg, Canada, with his family when he was a young boy. His studies at the Juilliard School were supported by the sponsorship of the Epstein Scholarship Program of the Boys Clubs of America, and he subsequently won the Young Concert Artists Award. Additionally, he attended Columbia University, where he majored in French. Mr. Ax captured public attention in 1974 when he won the first Arthur Rubinstein International Piano Competition in Tel Aviv. In 1975 he won the Michaels Award of Young Concert Artists followed four years later by the coveted Avery Fisher Prize.

The 2013/14 season begins with appearances at the Barbican Centre followed by Lincoln Center with the London Symphony Orchestra conducted by Bernard Haitink as well as collaborations with the Concertgebouworkester and Mariss Jansons in Amsterdam, Bucharest, China and Japan during their world-wide centenary celebrations. The second half of the season sees the realization of a project inspired by Brahms which includes new pieces from composers Missy Mazzoli, Nico Muhly, Brett Dean and Anders Hillborg all producing works linked to Brahms commissioned jointly between the Los Angeles Philharmonic, Cal Performances Berkeley, Chicago Symphony and Carnegie Hall with the participation of collaborators Anne-Sophie von Otter and Yo-Yo Ma. To conclude the season, he will travel to Hong Kong and Australia for a complete cycle of Beethoven concerti with incoming Chief Conductor David Roberston in Sydney and with Sir Andrew Davis in Melbourne.

In conjunction with his multiple weeks as Artist in Residence with the New York Philharmonic during the 2012/13 season, Sony Classical released his latest recital disc of works from Haydn to Schumann to Copland reflecting their different uses of the "Variation" concept. In the spring he joined that orchestra on their European tour conducted by Alan Gilbert. He returned to the orchestras in Los Angeles, St. Louis, Atlanta, Detroit, Washington, and Pittsburgh where he is a beloved regular.

Highlights of the 2011/12 season included return visits to the symphonies of Boston, Houston, Toronto, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Detroit, Cincinnati; New York, and Los Angeles Philharmonics and San Francisco Symphony with whom he collaborated in the "American Mavericks" festival presented in San Francisco, Ann Arbor, MI and Carnegie Hall, NY. As curator and participant with the Chicago Symphony for a two week spring residency "Keys to the City" he performed multiple roles as leader and collaborator in a festival celebrating the many varied facets of the piano.

A Sony Classical exclusive recording artist since 1987, recent releases include Mendelssohn Trios with Yo-Yo- Ma and Itzhak Perlman, Strauss's Enoch Arden narrated by Patrick Stewart, and discs of two-piano music by Brahms and Rachmaninoff with Yefim Bronfman. Mr. Ax has received GRAMMY® Awards for the second and third volumes of his cycle of Haydn's piano sonatas. He has also made a series of Grammy-winning recordings with cellist Yo-Yo Ma of the Beethoven and Brahms sonatas for cello and piano. His other recordings include the concertos of Liszt and Schoenberg, three solo Brahms albums, an album of tangos by Astor Piazzolla, and the premiere recording of John Adams's Century Rolls with the Cleveland Orchestra for Nonesuch. In the 2004/05 season Mr. Ax also contributed to an International EMMY® Award-Winning BBC documentary commemorating the Holocaust that aired on the 60th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz.

In recent years, Mr. Ax has turned his attention toward the music of 20th-century composers, premiering works by John Adams, Christopher Rouse, Krzysztof Penderecki, Bright Sheng, and Melinda Wagner. Mr. Ax is also devoted to chamber music, and has worked regularly with such artists as Young Uck Kim, Cho-Liang Lin, Mr. Ma, Edgar Meyer, Peter Serkin, Jaime Laredo, and the late Isaac Stern.

Mr. Ax resides in New York City with his wife, pianist Yoko Nozaki. They have two children together, Joseph and Sarah. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and holds honorary doctorates of music from Yale and Columbia Universities. For more information about Mr. Ax's career, please visit www.EmanuelAx.com. View biography in full page >

Malcolm Lowe joined the Boston Symphony Orchestra as concertmaster in 1984, becoming the tenth concertmaster in the orchestra's history and only its third since 1920. As concertmaster, he also performs with the Boston Symphony Chamber Players. Mr. Lowe is equally at home as an orchestral player, chamber musician, solo recitalist, and teacher. He appears frequently as a soloist with the Boston Symphony Orchestra at Symphony Hall and Tanglewood and he has returned many times to his native Canada for guest appearances as a soloist with the Toronto and Montreal Symphony Orchestras and the National Arts Centre Orchestra in Ottawa.

Mr. Lowe is a faculty member at the Tanglewood Music Center, New England Conservatory, and Boston University. Prior to his Boston appointment, he was concertmaster of the Quebec Symphony Orchestra. The recipient of many awards, he was one of the top laureate winners in the 1979 Montreal International Violin Competition. Born to musical parents – his father was a violinist and his mother a vocalist – on a farm in Hamiota, Manitoba, Mr. Lowe moved with his family to Regina, Saskatchewan at the age of nine. There he studied at the Regina Conservatory of Music with Howard Leyton-Brown, former concertmaster of the London Philharmonic. He later studied with Ivan Galamian at the Meadowmount School of Music and at the Curtis Institute of Music. Mr. Lowe also studied violin with Sally Thomas and Jaime Laredo and was greatly influenced by Josef Gingold, Felix Galimir, Alexander Schneider, and Jascha Brodsky. View biography in full page >

Haldan Martinson made his solo debut with the Los Angeles Philharmonic in 1990 and made his national television debut in 1988 performing on Johnny Carson's Tonight Show. Mr. Martinson has soloed with many other orchestras, including the Waterloo-Cedar Falls Symphony Orchestra, the Metamorphosen Chamber Orchestra and the Yale Symphony Orchestra. Mr. Martinson is the recipient of numerous prizes, scholarships, and awards including the Spotlight Award of the Los Angeles Music Center. He has participated in the chamber music festivals of Ravinia, Taos, Santa Fe, and La Jolla. From 1996 to 1998 he was a member of the Metamorphosen Chamber Ensemble.

Mr. Martinson graduated with a B.A. in Music from Yale College (1994), where he was awarded the Louis Sudler Prize, one of the most prestigious awards granted by the university. He was concertmaster of the Yale Symphony Orchestra from 1991 to 1994. Mr. Martinson received a Master of Music degree from New England Conservatory (1997). His former teachers have included Robert Lipsett, Endré Granat, David Nadien, Aaron Rosand, and James Buswell.

Mr. Martinson is also a prize-winning composer whose works for string ensemble have been featured frequently in concert. One of Mr. Martinson's works, Dance of the Trolls for string orchestra, was commissioned by the Crossroads Chamber Orchestra in 1988 and has since been performed throughout Southern California.

As principal second violin of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Mr. Martinson is also a member of the Boston Symphony Chamber Players. He joined the orchestra as a section violinist in November 1998 and was appointed to his current position in the summer of 2000. From 1998-2002 he was a member of the critically acclaimed Hawthorne String Quartet. View biography in full page >

Steven Ansell joined the Boston Symphony Orchestra as principal viola in September 1996, occupying the Charles S. Dana chair, having already appeared with the BSO in Symphony Hall as guest principal viola. A native of Seattle, he also remains a member of the acclaimed Muir String Quartet, which he co-founded in 1979, and with which he has toured extensively throughout the world. A graduate of the Curtis Institute of Music, where he studied with Michael Tree and Karen Tuttle, Mr. Ansell was named professor of viola at the University of Houston at twenty-one and became assistant principal viola of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra under André Previn at twenty-three. As a recording artist he has received two Grand Prix du Disque awards and a Gramophone magazine award for Best Chamber Music Recording of the Year. He has appeared on PBS's "In Performance at the White House," has participated in the Tanglewood, Marlboro, Schleswig-Holstein, Newport, Blossom, Spoleto, and Snowbird music festivals, and premiered Ezra Laderman's Concerto for Viola and Orchestra with the Berkshires Symphony Orchestra. Mr. Ansell teaches at the Boston University College of Fine Arts. As principal viola of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, he is also a member of the Boston Symphony Chamber Players. His solo appearances with the Boston Symphony Orchestra have included performances of Mozart's Sinfonia concertante for violin and viola, Bruch's Concerto for Viola, Clarinet and Orchestra, Strauss's Don Quixote (which he will play again with James Levine and the orchestra in February), and Berlioz's Harold in Italy, which he has previously performed with the BSO under the direction of both Emmanuel Krivine and James Levine, his performances of the Berlioz with Levine in October 2008 and at Tanglewood in July 2009 being his most recent solo appearances with the BSO. View biography in full page >

Born in Philadelphia, Boston Symphony Orchestra principal cello Jules Eskin came to the BSO in 1964 after three years as principal cello with the Cleveland Orchestra under George Szell.  His father, an amateur cellist, gave him his first lessons, and at the age of 16 he joined the Dallas Symphony Orchestra under Antal Dorati.  Mr. Eskin studied with Janos Starker in Dallas and later with Gregor Piatigorsky and Leonard Rose at the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia.  In 1947 and 1948, he was a fellowship student at the Tanglewood Music Center.  In 1954 Mr. Eskin was awarded first prize in the prestigious Walter Naumburg Competition; he gave his New York Town Hall debut recital that same year.  This led to an extended concert tour in Europe.

Mr. Eskin has participated in the Marlboro Music Festival and played with the Casals Festival Orchestra in Puerto Rico.  His chamber music collaborations have included appearances with Isaac Stern and Friends and the Guarneri String Quartet and piano trio performances with Arnold Steinhardt and Lydia Artymiw.  As a founding member of the Boston Symphony Chamber Players, Mr. Eskin has performed throughout the world and has recorded numerous chamber works for the RCA, Deutsche Grammophon, Northeastern, and Nonesuch labels.  He has been soloist with the Boston Symphony Orchestra in Richard Strauss's Don Quixote, Ernest Bloch's Schelomo, Johannes Brahms's Double Concerto, and the cello concerts of Antonin Dvo?ák, Fran Joseph Haydn, Camille Saint-Saëns, and Robert Schumann.  Mr. Eskin is featured on a Deutsche Grammophon album of music by Gabriel Fauré with the Boston Symphony Orchestra. View biography in full page >

BSO principal bass Edwin Barker has concertized in North America, Europe, and the Far East. He has performed and recorded with the BSO, the Boston Symphony Chamber Players, and the contemporary music ensemble Collage, and is a frequent guest performer with the Boston Chamber Music Society. Mr. Barker gave the world premieres of James Yannatos' Concerto for Contrabass and Chamber Orchestra (which was written especially for him) and of Theodore Antoniou's Concertino for Contrabass and Chamber Orchestra; he was the featured soloist in the New England premiere of Gunther Schuller's Concerto for Double Bass and Chamber Orchestra. Mr. Barker graduated with honors in 1976 from the New England Conservatory, where he studied double bass with Henry Portnoi. That same year, at age twenty-two, while a member of the Chicago Symphony, he was appointed principal double bass of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. His other double bass teachers included Peter Mercurio, Richard Stephan, Angelo LaMariana, and David Perleman. Mr. Barker inaugurated the BSO's 100th Anniversary Season with performances of Koussevitzky's Bass Concerto; other solo engagements have included appearances at Seiji Ozawa Hall, Carnegie Recital Hall, and major universities and conferences throughout the world, as well as concerto performances with the Boston Classical Orchestra and the Boston Symphony Orchestra in Boston and Europe. In July 1995 he was chosen by the late Sir Georg Solti to lead the bass section of the United Nations' "Musicians of the World," an orchestra made up of prominent musicians from the world's finest orchestras. Mr. Barker is an associate professor at the Boston University College of Fine Arts, where he teaches double bass, orchestral techniques, and chamber music. His other major teaching affiliations include the BSO's Tanglewood Music Center, where he is Chairman of Instrumental and Orchestral Studies, and the National Orchestral Institute at the University of Maryland. His solo CDs include "Three Sonatas for Double Bass"; James Yannatos' Variations for Solo Contrabass, and the recently released "Concerti for Double Bass," which includes concertos by Gunther Schuller and Theodore Antoniou. View biography in full page >

BSO principal flutist Elizabeth Rowe joined the Boston Symphony Orchestra in 2004 and holds the Walter Piston Principal Flute Chair. Prior to joining the BSO, Ms. Rowe held titled positions with the orchestras of Fort Wayne, Baltimore, and Washington, D.C., and was a member of the New World Symphony in Miami Beach, Florida. Regularly featured in front of the orchestra, Ms. Rowe's solo appearances with the BSO include the American premiere performances of Elliott Carter's Flute Concerto under the direction of James Levine, the Ligeti Concerto for Flute and Oboe with Christoph von Dohnanyi conducting, Gabriela Lena Frank's Illapa, Tone Poem for Flute and Orchestra under the direction of Miguel Harth-Bedoya, and Mozart's G major Flute Concerto, K.313, under the direction of André Previn.

Noted for her insightful teaching, Ms. Rowe attracts flute students from around the country to her lessons and master classes. She currently serves on the faculties of the New England Conservatory and the Tanglewood Music Center and is a regular guest artist at the National Orchestral Institute of Music and the New World Symphony. She has previously taught at both the Peabody Conservatory of Music and the University of Maryland. A member of the Boston Symphony Chamber Players, she can be heard in a wide variety of chamber works throughout the season at NEC's Jordan Hall and in several recordings.

Elizabeth Rowe grew up in Eugene, Oregon. She received her bachelor of music degree from the University of Southern California, where she was a Trustee Scholar and a student of Jim Walker, former principal flute of the Los Angeles Philharmonic. Ms. Rowe recently returned to Los Angeles to join Mr. Walker as a guest teacher at his week-long intensive course, "Beyond the Masterclass." Ms. Rowe's connection to the Boston Symphony dates back to the summer of 1996, when she was a Tanglewood Music Center Fellow and performed as principal flute under the direction of Seiji Ozawa in the TMC's fiftieth-anniversary production of Benjamin Britten's opera Peter Grimes. View biography in full page >

John Ferrillo joined the Boston Symphony Orchestra as principal oboe at the start of the 2001 Tanglewood season, having appeared with the orchestra several times as a guest performer in previous seasons. From 1986 to 2001 he was principal oboe of the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra. Mr. Ferrillo grew up in Bedford, Massachusetts, and played in the Greater Boston Youth Symphony Orchestra. He is a graduate of the Curtis Institute, where he studied with John deLancie and received his diploma and Artist's certificate. He also studied with John Mack at the Blossom Festival and has   participated in the Marlboro, Craftsbury, and Monadnock festivals. Prior to his appointment at the Metropolitan Opera, Mr. Ferrillo was second oboe of the San Francisco Symphony, and was a faculty member at Illinois State University and West Virginia State University. A former  faculty member of the Mannes School of Music and Juilliard School of Music in New York City, he has taught and performed at the Aspen and Waterloo festivals and currently serves on the faculty of the New England Conservatory, Boston University, and the Boston University Tanglewood Institute. View biography in full page >

William R. Hudgins was appointed principal clarinetist of the Boston Symphony Orchestra by Seiji Ozawa in 1994, occupying the Ann S.M. Banks chair, having joined the orchestra two years earlier. He has been heard as a soloist with the Boston Symphony Orchestra on numerous occasions, including performances of Mozart's Clarinet Concerto, with which he made his BSO debut as concerto soloist in 1995, Copland's Clarinet Concerto, Bruch's Double Concerto for Clarinet and Viola, and Frank Martin's Concerto for Seven Winds, Timpani, Percussion, and String Orchestra. As a member of the Boston Symphony Chamber Players, he can be heard on their latest CD, "Plain Song, Fantastic Dances," in music of Gandolfi, Foss, and Golijov, as well as on their compact disc "Mozart Chamber Music for Winds and Strings" in Mozart's Quintet for Clarinet and Strings, K.581, and on a Grammy-nominated Arabesque recording of Hindemith's Quartet for Clarinet, Violin, Cello, and Piano. Recent performances outside of the Boston Symphony Orchestra include orchestral performances and recordings with the Saito Kinen Orchestra in Matsumoto, Japan, and the Mito Chamber Orchestra in Mito, Japan, both under the direction of Seiji Ozawa. Mr. Hudgins performed in the December 2010 Susan G. Komen "Concert for the Cure" breast cancer benefit concert under the direction of Sir Simon Rattle. Appearances at the Rockport Chamber Music Festival include performances of Wagner and Copland in the inaugural concert at the Shalin Liu Performance Center in June 2010. He is scheduled to perform the Copland Clarinet Concerto with Boston's Discovery Ensemble at Sanders Theatre in November 2011.

Before joining the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Mr. Hudgins served as principal clarinetist and soloist with the Orquesta Sinfonica Municipal in Caracas, Venezuela, and the Charleston Symphony Orchestra in South Carolina. He was heard for six seasons as a member of both the Spoleto Festival Orchestra in Charleston, South Carolina, and the Festival of Two Worlds in Spoleto, Italy. He also participated as a Fellow of the Tanglewood Music Center, where he won the C.D. Jackson Award for outstanding performance. Mr. Hudgins received his bachelor's degree from the Boston University School for the Arts, studying primarily with former BSO principal clarinetist Harold Wright. His teachers also included members of the Indianapolis and Cincinnati symphony orchestras and Jules Serpentini, formerly of the Philadelphia Orchestra. View biography in full page >

Richard Svoboda has been the principal bassoonist of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and a member of the Boston Symphony Chamber Players since 1989; as the BSO's principal bassoon he occupies the Edward A. Taft Chair, endowed in perpetuity. Mr. Svoboda is currently on the faculties of the New England Conservatory of Music, the Tanglewood Music Center, and the Sarasota Music Festival, and has given master classes throughout the world. Prior to his BSO appointment, he performed for ten seasons as principal bassoonist of the Jacksonville Symphony.

Mr. Svoboda is an active chamber music collaborator, orchestral soloist, and recitalist. Among his solo appearances with the Boston Symphony Orchestra have been performances of John Williams's bassoon concerto Five Sacred Trees with the composer conducting and Weber's Concerto for Bassoon under the baton of Seiji Ozawa. In November 2013 he is soloist in the world premiere of Marc Neikrug's BSO-commissioned Concerto for Bassoon and Orchestra with R afael Frühbeck de Burgos on the podium. In 2007 he premiered Michael Gandolfi's Concerto for Bassoon, and in 2011, along with his daughter, clarinetist Erin Svoboda, he premiered Gandolfi's Concerto for Clarinet and Bassoon, both times collaborating with Yoichi Udagawa and the Melrose Symphony Orchestra.

Richard Svoboda has to his credit over thirty recordings with the Boston Symphony Orchestra and Boston Symphony Chamber Players, as well as the soundtracks to Schindler's List and Saving Private Ryan. His recording of Michael Gandolfi's Concerto for Bassoon with Gil Rose and the Boston Modern Orchestra Project was a May 2013 release, and two CDs of solo bassoon repertoire are in various stages of completion. "Le Phénix, 18th-Century French Music for Bassoon," including music of Boismortier, Corrette, and Devienne, was released in November 2013, and a CD of early 20th-century European music is in the editing stage.

Mr. Svoboda is married and is the extremely proud father of four daughters. He and his family reside in Melrose. For further information, please visit RichardSvoboda.com. View biography in full page >

James Sommerville is Principal Horn of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, a position he has held since 1998. He is also Music Director of the Hamilton Philharmonic Orchestra. The winner of the highest prizes at the Munich, Toulon, and CBC competitions, Mr. Sommerville has pursued a solo career that has spanned 25 years, and has brought critically acclaimed appearances with major orchestras throughout North America and Europe. His disc of the Mozart Horn Concertos with the CBC Vancouver Orchestra won the JUNO Award for Best Classical Recording in Canada. Other award-winning CBC recordings include the Britten Serenade for Tenor, Horn, and Strings and Britten's Canticle. Mr. Sommerville has recorded chamber music for the Deutsche Gramophon, Telarc, CBC, Summit, and Marquis labels. He is a member of the Boston Symphony Chamber Players, with whom he tours and records regularly.

Mr. Sommerville has been a member of the Toronto and Montreal Symphony Orchestras, the Canadian Opera Company Orchestra, Symphony Nova Scotia, and was acting solo horn of the Chamber Orchestra of Europe. He has toured and recorded extensively as an orchestral player. He is heard regularly on the CBC network, and has recorded all the standard solo horn repertoire for broadcast.

As a guest artist and faculty member, Mr. Sommerville has performed at many chamber music festivals, throughout Canada, the USA, Europe and Japan. Recent solo performances of note include the world premiere of Christos Hatzis' Winter Solstice, in Yellowknife, NWT; the North American premiere of Ligeti's Hamburg Concerto with the BSO; and the John Williams Horn Concerto. In recent seasons, Mr. Sommerville has appeared as a soloist in London (with the Academy of St. Martin's in the Fields), and in Costa Rica, Holland, Quebec, Ottawa, and Italy. In 2007, he performed the world premiere of Elliot Carter's Horn Concerto, commissioned for him by the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Mr. Sommerville also tours as a member of Osvaldo Golijov's Andalucian Dogs. In April, 2010, he stepped in on 48 hours' notice to perform Mozart's Horn Concerto #2 with Bernard Haitink and the Boston Symphony.

As a conductor, Mr. Sommerville has appeared with many professional orchestras and ensembles, throughout Canada and the USA. He has led the Hamilton Philharmonic to great critical acclaim in his three years there as Music Director. Recent engagements include appearances with Symphony Nova Scotia and the Toronto Symphony Orchestra; 2011 and 2012 will bring performances leading the Edmonton, London (Ontario) and Québec Symphony Orchestras.

at The New England Conservatory of Music
290 Huntington Avenue
Boston, United States

Washington | Posted by admin

Boston Symphony Chamber Players with French pianist Jean-Yves Thibaudet

July 21st, 2014

Boston Symphony Chamber Players with French pianist Jean-Yves Thibaudet
Event on 2015-04-01 15:00:00

French pianist  Jean-Yves Thibaudet joins the Boston Symphony Chamber Players on Sunday, April 26 to close out the 2014-15 Chamber Player's season with a program highlighting great French music. The program features works by three quintessential French composers: Ravel's iridescent Introduction and Allegro for harp, accompanied by string quartet, flute, and clarinet, one of the first pieces to use the full range of the harp in a solo role; Poulenc's elegant three-movement Sextet for piano and winds; and Fauré's Piano Quartet No. 1 in C minor, Op. 15, a surprisingly warm and welcoming piece despite its key. The program also includes American composer Hannah Lash's  Three Shades Without Angles for flute, viola, and harp, commissioned by the BSO for the Chamber Players' 50th anniversary season to use the same ensemble template as Debussy's seminal Sonata for flute, viola, and harp. Lash's elegant, vibrant single-movement work, partly inspired by Debussy's compatriot, the sculptor Auguste Rodin, received its world premiere in February 2014. View biography in full page >

One of today's most sought-after soloists, Jean-Yves Thibaudet has the rare ability to combine poetic musical sensibilities with dazzling technical prowess. His talent at coaxing subtle and surprising colors and textures from each work he plays has led The New York Times to exclaim that "every note he fashions is a pearl…the joy, brilliance and musicality of his performance could not be missed." Thibaudet, who has performed around the world for more than 30 years and recorded more than 50 albums, has a musical depth and natural charisma that have underlined his career.

After appearing at the Hollywood Bowl, Tanglewood and Ravinia, Thibaudet begins his 2012-2013 season playing Gershwin for the opening of New Jersey Symphony's season.  Thibaudet will tour Europe with Kammerorchester Basel followed by a recital tour in the US performing an all-Debussy program at Lincoln Center, in San Francisco and Houston. After engagements with the Deutsches Symphonie Orchester Berlin and at the Lucerne Festival, Thibaudet will play Saint-Saëns' Piano Concerto No. 5 with the Boston Symphony and then bow with the Oslo Philharmonic and the Helsinki Philharmonic Orchestra. In the new year, Thibaudet will continue his season with the New York Philharmonic and Colorado Symphony; perform Messiaen's Turangalila with the Seattle Symphony and the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra; Liszt Piano Concerto No. 2 with Bergen Philharmonic and Ravel's Piano Concerto in G major with the RAI Orchestra in Torino and the Castilla y Leon Symphony Orchestra in Valladolid. After playing a Bernstein tour in Spain with the Deutsches Symphonie Orchester Berlin, Thibaudet will proceed with playing Ravel's Piano Concerto in G major with the Philadelphia Orchestra at their home and at Carnegie Hall. Thibaudet will open the season for Sao Paolo State Symphony, then play James MacMillan's Piano Concerto No. 3, a work that was premiered by Thibaudet in 2011, with the Radio-Sinfonieorchester Stuttgart and go on to perform Liszt with  NDR Sinfonieorchester, Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France and with the Royal Flemish Philharmonic. April brings about an exciting three weeklong residency in Thibaudet's native town Lyon with the Orchestre National de Lyon including performances of the MacMillan and Gershwin piano concerti as well as a recital and various chamber music concerts. Thibaudet will finish the season playing Saint-Saëns with the Los Angeles Philharmonic and Chicago Symphony and MacMillan with the Nashville, Atlanta, Indianapolis Symphonies as well as the National Symphony Orchestra.

Thibaudet builds seasons around composers, delving into their repertoire with unmatched passion and depth. Much of the 2011-2012 season was centered on Liszt, Ravel, and Saint-Saëns, whose works he performed with the Philadelphia Orchestra, the San Diego Symphony and the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, among others. On tour Thibaudet performed a program of Liszt lieder and Brahms lieder with mezzo-soprano Angelika Kirchschlager, including a stop at New York's Carnegie Hall. After performances with the New York Philharmonic for its PBS-televised New Year's Eve Gala and with the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, Thibaudet continued his season with Debussy recitals in Germany and France, celebrating the 150th anniversary of the composer's birth.

Jean-Yves Thibaudet has released more than 40 albums with Decca, which have won the Schallplattenpreis, the Diapason d'Or, Choc du Monde de la Musique, a Gramophone Award, two Echo awards and the Edison Prize. In 2010, Thibaudet released his latest CD, Gershwin, featuring big jazz band orchestrations of Rhapsody in Blue, variations on "I Got Rhythm" and Concerto in F live with the Baltimore Symphony and music director Marin Alsop. On his Grammy-nominated recording Saint-Saëns, Piano Concerti Nos. 2&5, released in 2007, Thibaudet is joined by long-standing collaborator Charles Dutoit and the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande. Also released in 2007, Thibaudet's Aria-Opera Without Words features transcriptions of arias by Saint-Saëns, R. Strauss, Gluck, Korngold, Bellini, J. Strauss II, P. Grainger and Puccini; some of the transcriptions are by Mikhashoff, Sgambati and Brassin, and others are Thibaudet's own. Among his other recordings are Satie: The Complete Solo Piano Music and the jazz albums Reflections on Duke: Jean-Yves Thibaudet Plays the Music of Duke Ellington and Conversations With Bill Evans, his tribute to two of jazz history's greats.

Known for his style and elegance on and off the traditional concert stage, Thibaudet has had an impact on the world of fashion, film and philanthropy. His concert wardrobe is by celebrated London designer Vivienne Westwood. In 2004, Mr. Thibaudet served as president of the prestigious Hospices de Beaune, an annual charity auction in Burgundy, France. He had an onscreen cameo in the Bruce Beresford feature film on Alma Mahler, Bride of the Wind, and his playing is showcased throughout the soundtrack. Thibaudet was the soloist on the Oscar- and Golden Globe-award winning soundtrack to Universal Pictures' Atonement and the Oscar-nominated Pride and Prejudice. . Even more recently, Jean-Yves recorded the soundtrack of the 2012 film, Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close, composed by Alexandre Desplat. He was also featured in the 2000 PBS/Smithsonian special Piano Grand!, a piano performance program hosted by Billy Joel to pay tribute to the 300th anniversary of the piano.

Jean-Yves Thibaudet was born in Lyon, France, where he began his piano studies at age five and made his first public appearance at age seven. At twelve, he entered the Paris Conservatory to study with Aldo Ciccolini and Lucette Descaves, a friend and collaborator of Ravel. At age fifteen, he won the Premier Prix du Conservatoire and, three years later, won the Young Concert Artists Auditions in New York City. In 2001, the Republic of France awarded Thibaudet the prestigious Chevalier dans l'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres and in 2002, he was awarded the Premio Pegasus from the Spoleto Festival in Italy for his artistic achievements and his long-standing involvement with the festival. In 2007, he was awarded the Victoire d'Honneur, a lifetime career achievement award and the highest honor given by France's Victoires de la Musique. The Hollywood Bowl honored Thibaudet for his musical achievements by inducting him into its Hall of Fame in 2010. Previously a Chevalier of L'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres, Thibaudet was awarded the title Officier by the French Ministry of Culture in 2012. View biography in full page >

Malcolm Lowe joined the Boston Symphony Orchestra as concertmaster in 1984, becoming the tenth concertmaster in the orchestra's history and only its third since 1920. As concertmaster, he also performs with the Boston Symphony Chamber Players. Mr. Lowe is equally at home as an orchestral player, chamber musician, solo recitalist, and teacher. He appears frequently as a soloist with the Boston Symphony Orchestra at Symphony Hall and Tanglewood and he has returned many times to his native Canada for guest appearances as a soloist with the Toronto and Montreal Symphony Orchestras and the National Arts Centre Orchestra in Ottawa.

Mr. Lowe is a faculty member at the Tanglewood Music Center, New England Conservatory, and Boston University. Prior to his Boston appointment, he was concertmaster of the Quebec Symphony Orchestra. The recipient of many awards, he was one of the top laureate winners in the 1979 Montreal International Violin Competition. Born to musical parents – his father was a violinist and his mother a vocalist – on a farm in Hamiota, Manitoba, Mr. Lowe moved with his family to Regina, Saskatchewan at the age of nine. There he studied at the Regina Conservatory of Music with Howard Leyton-Brown, former concertmaster of the London Philharmonic. He later studied with Ivan Galamian at the Meadowmount School of Music and at the Curtis Institute of Music. Mr. Lowe also studied violin with Sally Thomas and Jaime Laredo and was greatly influenced by Josef Gingold, Felix Galimir, Alexander Schneider, and Jascha Brodsky. View biography in full page >

Haldan Martinson made his solo debut with the Los Angeles Philharmonic in 1990 and made his national television debut in 1988 performing on Johnny Carson's Tonight Show. Mr. Martinson has soloed with many other orchestras, including the Waterloo-Cedar Falls Symphony Orchestra, the Metamorphosen Chamber Orchestra and the Yale Symphony Orchestra. Mr. Martinson is the recipient of numerous prizes, scholarships, and awards including the Spotlight Award of the Los Angeles Music Center. He has participated in the chamber music festivals of Ravinia, Taos, Santa Fe, and La Jolla. From 1996 to 1998 he was a member of the Metamorphosen Chamber Ensemble.

Mr. Martinson graduated with a B.A. in Music from Yale College (1994), where he was awarded the Louis Sudler Prize, one of the most prestigious awards granted by the university. He was concertmaster of the Yale Symphony Orchestra from 1991 to 1994. Mr. Martinson received a Master of Music degree from New England Conservatory (1997). His former teachers have included Robert Lipsett, Endré Granat, David Nadien, Aaron Rosand, and James Buswell.

Mr. Martinson is also a prize-winning composer whose works for string ensemble have been featured frequently in concert. One of Mr. Martinson's works, Dance of the Trolls for string orchestra, was commissioned by the Crossroads Chamber Orchestra in 1988 and has since been performed throughout Southern California.

As principal second violin of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Mr. Martinson is also a member of the Boston Symphony Chamber Players. He joined the orchestra as a section violinist in November 1998 and was appointed to his current position in the summer of 2000. From 1998-2002 he was a member of the critically acclaimed Hawthorne String Quartet. View biography in full page >

Steven Ansell joined the Boston Symphony Orchestra as principal viola in September 1996, occupying the Charles S. Dana chair, having already appeared with the BSO in Symphony Hall as guest principal viola. A native of Seattle, he also remains a member of the acclaimed Muir String Quartet, which he co-founded in 1979, and with which he has toured extensively throughout the world. A graduate of the Curtis Institute of Music, where he studied with Michael Tree and Karen Tuttle, Mr. Ansell was named professor of viola at the University of Houston at twenty-one and became assistant principal viola of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra under André Previn at twenty-three. As a recording artist he has received two Grand Prix du Disque awards and a Gramophone magazine award for Best Chamber Music Recording of the Year. He has appeared on PBS's "In Performance at the White House," has participated in the Tanglewood, Marlboro, Schleswig-Holstein, Newport, Blossom, Spoleto, and Snowbird music festivals, and premiered Ezra Laderman's Concerto for Viola and Orchestra with the Berkshires Symphony Orchestra. Mr. Ansell teaches at the Boston University College of Fine Arts. As principal viola of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, he is also a member of the Boston Symphony Chamber Players. His solo appearances with the Boston Symphony Orchestra have included performances of Mozart's Sinfonia concertante for violin and viola, Bruch's Concerto for Viola, Clarinet and Orchestra, Strauss's Don Quixote (which he will play again with James Levine and the orchestra in February), and Berlioz's Harold in Italy, which he has previously performed with the BSO under the direction of both Emmanuel Krivine and James Levine, his performances of the Berlioz with Levine in October 2008 and at Tanglewood in July 2009 being his most recent solo appearances with the BSO. View biography in full page >

Born in Philadelphia, Boston Symphony Orchestra principal cello Jules Eskin came to the BSO in 1964 after three years as principal cello with the Cleveland Orchestra under George Szell.  His father, an amateur cellist, gave him his first lessons, and at the age of 16 he joined the Dallas Symphony Orchestra under Antal Dorati.  Mr. Eskin studied with Janos Starker in Dallas and later with Gregor Piatigorsky and Leonard Rose at the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia.  In 1947 and 1948, he was a fellowship student at the Tanglewood Music Center.  In 1954 Mr. Eskin was awarded first prize in the prestigious Walter Naumburg Competition; he gave his New York Town Hall debut recital that same year.  This led to an extended concert tour in Europe.

Mr. Eskin has participated in the Marlboro Music Festival and played with the Casals Festival Orchestra in Puerto Rico.  His chamber music collaborations have included appearances with Isaac Stern and Friends and the Guarneri String Quartet and piano trio performances with Arnold Steinhardt and Lydia Artymiw.  As a founding member of the Boston Symphony Chamber Players, Mr. Eskin has performed throughout the world and has recorded numerous chamber works for the RCA, Deutsche Grammophon, Northeastern, and Nonesuch labels.  He has been soloist with the Boston Symphony Orchestra in Richard Strauss's Don Quixote, Ernest Bloch's Schelomo, Johannes Brahms's Double Concerto, and the cello concerts of Antonin Dvo?ák, Fran Joseph Haydn, Camille Saint-Saëns, and Robert Schumann.  Mr. Eskin is featured on a Deutsche Grammophon album of music by Gabriel Fauré with the Boston Symphony Orchestra. View biography in full page >

BSO principal bass Edwin Barker has concertized in North America, Europe, and the Far East. He has performed and recorded with the BSO, the Boston Symphony Chamber Players, and the contemporary music ensemble Collage, and is a frequent guest performer with the Boston Chamber Music Society. Mr. Barker gave the world premieres of James Yannatos' Concerto for Contrabass and Chamber Orchestra (which was written especially for him) and of Theodore Antoniou's Concertino for Contrabass and Chamber Orchestra; he was the featured soloist in the New England premiere of Gunther Schuller's Concerto for Double Bass and Chamber Orchestra. Mr. Barker graduated with honors in 1976 from the New England Conservatory, where he studied double bass with Henry Portnoi. That same year, at age twenty-two, while a member of the Chicago Symphony, he was appointed principal double bass of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. His other double bass teachers included Peter Mercurio, Richard Stephan, Angelo LaMariana, and David Perleman. Mr. Barker inaugurated the BSO's 100th Anniversary Season with performances of Koussevitzky's Bass Concerto; other solo engagements have included appearances at Seiji Ozawa Hall, Carnegie Recital Hall, and major universities and conferences throughout the world, as well as concerto performances with the Boston Classical Orchestra and the Boston Symphony Orchestra in Boston and Europe. In July 1995 he was chosen by the late Sir Georg Solti to lead the bass section of the United Nations' "Musicians of the World," an orchestra made up of prominent musicians from the world's finest orchestras. Mr. Barker is an associate professor at the Boston University College of Fine Arts, where he teaches double bass, orchestral techniques, and chamber music. His other major teaching affiliations include the BSO's Tanglewood Music Center, where he is Chairman of Instrumental and Orchestral Studies, and the National Orchestral Institute at the University of Maryland. His solo CDs include "Three Sonatas for Double Bass"; James Yannatos' Variations for Solo Contrabass, and the recently released "Concerti for Double Bass," which includes concertos by Gunther Schuller and Theodore Antoniou. View biography in full page >

BSO principal flutist Elizabeth Rowe joined the Boston Symphony Orchestra in 2004 and holds the Walter Piston Principal Flute Chair. Prior to joining the BSO, Ms. Rowe held titled positions with the orchestras of Fort Wayne, Baltimore, and Washington, D.C., and was a member of the New World Symphony in Miami Beach, Florida. Regularly featured in front of the orchestra, Ms. Rowe's solo appearances with the BSO include the American premiere performances of Elliott Carter's Flute Concerto under the direction of James Levine, the Ligeti Concerto for Flute and Oboe with Christoph von Dohnanyi conducting, Gabriela Lena Frank's Illapa, Tone Poem for Flute and Orchestra under the direction of Miguel Harth-Bedoya, and Mozart's G major Flute Concerto, K.313, under the direction of André Previn.

Noted for her insightful teaching, Ms. Rowe attracts flute students from around the country to her lessons and master classes. She currently serves on the faculties of the New England Conservatory and the Tanglewood Music Center and is a regular guest artist at the National Orchestral Institute of Music and the New World Symphony. She has previously taught at both the Peabody Conservatory of Music and the University of Maryland. A member of the Boston Symphony Chamber Players, she can be heard in a wide variety of chamber works throughout the season at NEC's Jordan Hall and in several recordings.

Elizabeth Rowe grew up in Eugene, Oregon. She received her bachelor of music degree from the University of Southern California, where she was a Trustee Scholar and a student of Jim Walker, former principal flute of the Los Angeles Philharmonic. Ms. Rowe recently returned to Los Angeles to join Mr. Walker as a guest teacher at his week-long intensive course, "Beyond the Masterclass." Ms. Rowe's connection to the Boston Symphony dates back to the summer of 1996, when she was a Tanglewood Music Center Fellow and performed as principal flute under the direction of Seiji Ozawa in the TMC's fiftieth-anniversary production of Benjamin Britten's opera Peter Grimes. View biography in full page >

John Ferrillo joined the Boston Symphony Orchestra as principal oboe at the start of the 2001 Tanglewood season, having appeared with the orchestra several times as a guest performer in previous seasons. From 1986 to 2001 he was principal oboe of the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra. Mr. Ferrillo grew up in Bedford, Massachusetts, and played in the Greater Boston Youth Symphony Orchestra. He is a graduate of the Curtis Institute, where he studied with John deLancie and received his diploma and Artist's certificate. He also studied with John Mack at the Blossom Festival and has   participated in the Marlboro, Craftsbury, and Monadnock festivals. Prior to his appointment at the Metropolitan Opera, Mr. Ferrillo was second oboe of the San Francisco Symphony, and was a faculty member at Illinois State University and West Virginia State University. A former  faculty member of the Mannes School of Music and Juilliard School of Music in New York City, he has taught and performed at the Aspen and Waterloo festivals and currently serves on the faculty of the New England Conservatory, Boston University, and the Boston University Tanglewood Institute. View biography in full page >

William R. Hudgins was appointed principal clarinetist of the Boston Symphony Orchestra by Seiji Ozawa in 1994, occupying the Ann S.M. Banks chair, having joined the orchestra two years earlier. He has been heard as a soloist with the Boston Symphony Orchestra on numerous occasions, including performances of Mozart's Clarinet Concerto, with which he made his BSO debut as concerto soloist in 1995, Copland's Clarinet Concerto, Bruch's Double Concerto for Clarinet and Viola, and Frank Martin's Concerto for Seven Winds, Timpani, Percussion, and String Orchestra. As a member of the Boston Symphony Chamber Players, he can be heard on their latest CD, "Plain Song, Fantastic Dances," in music of Gandolfi, Foss, and Golijov, as well as on their compact disc "Mozart Chamber Music for Winds and Strings" in Mozart's Quintet for Clarinet and Strings, K.581, and on a Grammy-nominated Arabesque recording of Hindemith's Quartet for Clarinet, Violin, Cello, and Piano. Recent performances outside of the Boston Symphony Orchestra include orchestral performances and recordings with the Saito Kinen Orchestra in Matsumoto, Japan, and the Mito Chamber Orchestra in Mito, Japan, both under the direction of Seiji Ozawa. Mr. Hudgins performed in the December 2010 Susan G. Komen "Concert for the Cure" breast cancer benefit concert under the direction of Sir Simon Rattle. Appearances at the Rockport Chamber Music Festival include performances of Wagner and Copland in the inaugural concert at the Shalin Liu Performance Center in June 2010. He is scheduled to perform the Copland Clarinet Concerto with Boston's Discovery Ensemble at Sanders Theatre in November 2011.

Before joining the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Mr. Hudgins served as principal clarinetist and soloist with the Orquesta Sinfonica Municipal in Caracas, Venezuela, and the Charleston Symphony Orchestra in South Carolina. He was heard for six seasons as a member of both the Spoleto Festival Orchestra in Charleston, South Carolina, and the Festival of Two Worlds in Spoleto, Italy. He also participated as a Fellow of the Tanglewood Music Center, where he won the C.D. Jackson Award for outstanding performance. Mr. Hudgins received his bachelor's degree from the Boston University School for the Arts, studying primarily with former BSO principal clarinetist Harold Wright. His teachers also included members of the Indianapolis and Cincinnati symphony orchestras and Jules Serpentini, formerly of the Philadelphia Orchestra. View biography in full page >

Richard Svoboda has been the principal bassoonist of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and a member of the Boston Symphony Chamber Players since 1989; as the BSO's principal bassoon he occupies the Edward A. Taft Chair, endowed in perpetuity. Mr. Svoboda is currently on the faculties of the New England Conservatory of Music, the Tanglewood Music Center, and the Sarasota Music Festival, and has given master classes throughout the world. Prior to his BSO appointment, he performed for ten seasons as principal bassoonist of the Jacksonville Symphony.

Mr. Svoboda is an active chamber music collaborator, orchestral soloist, and recitalist. Among his solo appearances with the Boston Symphony Orchestra have been performances of John Williams's bassoon concerto Five Sacred Trees with the composer conducting and Weber's Concerto for Bassoon under the baton of Seiji Ozawa. In November 2013 he is soloist in the world premiere of Marc Neikrug's BSO-commissioned Concerto for Bassoon and Orchestra with R afael Frühbeck de Burgos on the podium. In 2007 he premiered Michael Gandolfi's Concerto for Bassoon, and in 2011, along with his daughter, clarinetist Erin Svoboda, he premiered Gandolfi's Concerto for Clarinet and Bassoon, both times collaborating with Yoichi Udagawa and the Melrose Symphony Orchestra.

Richard Svoboda has to his credit over thirty recordings with the Boston Symphony Orchestra and Boston Symphony Chamber Players, as well as the soundtracks to Schindler's List and Saving Private Ryan. His recording of Michael Gandolfi's Concerto for Bassoon with Gil Rose and the Boston Modern Orchestra Project was a May 2013 release, and two CDs of solo bassoon repertoire are in various stages of completion. "Le Phénix, 18th-Century French Music for Bassoon," including music of Boismortier, Corrette, and Devienne, was released in November 2013, and a CD of early 20th-century European music is in the editing stage.

Mr. Svoboda is married and is the extremely proud father of four daughters. He and his family reside in Melrose. For further information, please visit RichardSvoboda.com. View biography in full page >

James Sommerville is Principal Horn of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, a position he has held since 1998. He is also Music Director of the Hamilton Philharmonic Orchestra. The winner of the highest prizes at the Munich, Toulon, and CBC competitions, Mr. Sommerville has pursued a solo career that has spanned 25 years, and has brought critically acclaimed appearances with major orchestras throughout North America and Europe. His disc of the Mozart Horn Concertos with the CBC Vancouver Orchestra won the JUNO Award for Best Classical Recording in Canada. Other award-winning CBC recordings include the Britten Serenade for Tenor, Horn, and Strings and Britten's Canticle. Mr. Sommerville has recorded chamber music for the Deutsche Gramophon, Telarc, CBC, Summit, and Marquis labels. He is a member of the Boston Symphony Chamber Players, with whom he tours and records regularly.

Mr. Sommerville has been a member of the Toronto and Montreal Symphony Orchestras, the Canadian Opera Company Orchestra, Symphony Nova Scotia, and was acting solo horn of the Chamber Orchestra of Europe. He has toured and recorded extensively as an orchestral player. He is heard regularly on the CBC network, and has recorded all the standard solo horn repertoire for broadcast.

As a guest artist and faculty member, Mr. Sommerville has performed at many chamber music festivals, throughout Canada, the USA, Europe and Japan. Recent solo performances of note include the world premiere of Christos Hatzis' Winter Solstice, in Yellowknife, NWT; the North American premiere of Ligeti's Hamburg Concerto with the BSO; and the John Williams Horn Concerto. In recent seasons, Mr. Sommerville has appeared as a soloist in London (with the Academy of St. Martin's in the Fields), and in Costa Rica, Holland, Quebec, Ottawa, and Italy. In 2007, he performed the world premiere of Elliot Carter's Horn Concerto, commissioned for him by the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Mr. Sommerville also tours as a member of Osvaldo Golijov's Andalucian Dogs. In April, 2010, he stepped in on 48 hours' notice to perform Mozart's Horn Concerto #2 with Bernard Haitink and the Boston Symphony.

As a conductor, Mr. Sommerville has appeared with many professional orchestras and ensembles, throughout Canada and the USA. He has led the Hamilton Philharmonic to great critical acclaim in his three years there as Music Director. Recent engagements include appearances with Symphony Nova Scotia and the Toronto Symphony Orchestra; 2011 and 2012 will bring performances leading the Edmonton, London (Ontario) and Québec Symphony Orchestras.

at The New England Conservatory of Music
290 Huntington Avenue
Boston, United States

Washington | Posted by admin

Austin – Texas State Capitol: Senate Chamber -Dawn at the Alamo

June 16th, 2014

Some cool Senate images:

Austin – Texas State Capitol: Senate Chamber -Dawn at the Alamo
Senate
Image by wallyg
Dawn at the Alamo, one of two paintings by Texas artist Henry Arthur McArdle, anchors the west side of the Senate Chamber. Completed in 1905, the 7-foot by 12-foot oil painting replaced an 1875 version that was destroyed while on display in the Limestone Capitol when it burned in 1881. It is an extremely detailed, although not entirely historically accurate, interpretation of The Battle of the Alamo, a pivotal event during the Texas Revolution. During the course of a 13-day siege in 1836, all but two of the approximately 187 Texians, under the command of James Bowie and William B. Travis, lost their lives defending the fort at the Alamo Mission near San Antonio de Béxar against Mexican General General Santa Anna’s army of more than 5,000 troops. This painting shows the heroic Texians including David Crockett (during his last stand swinging "Old Betsy" protecting women and children–lower right corner), the ill James Bowie (using his trademark knife–lower left corner) and Commander William B. Travis (as he is stabbed in the back–upper right corner). In actuality, Travis, pictured here larger-than-life, was one of the first killed in the battle which occurred on March 6, 1836.

The Senate Chamber, located on the second floor east wing of the Texas State Capitol, is where the thirty-one state senators meet during Texas legislative sessions to work with the House of Representatives enacting the laws of the state. Restored to its c. 1910 appearance, the Senate Chamber still contains the original walnut desks purchased in 1888 for the Lieutenant Governor, Secretary of the Senate and 31 senators from the A. H. Andrews and Company of Chicago. The Lieutenant Governor’s desk is located in front of a reproduction drapery treatment and a mid-nineteenth century portrait of Stephen F. Austin by an unknown artist.

The Texas State Capitol, anchoring 22-acres of landscaped grounds originally designated as Capitol Square in 1839, was designed in 1881 by architect Elijah E. Myers, and was constructed from 1882 to 1888 under the direction of civil engineer Reuben Lindsay Walker. The Italian Renaissance Revival seat of Texas state government houses the two the chambers of the Texas Legislature and the office of the governor.

Austin – Texas State Capitol: Senate Chamber -Dawn at the Alamo
Senate
Image by wallyg
Dawn at the Alamo, one of two paintings by Texas artist Henry Arthur McArdle, anchors the west side of the Senate Chamber. Completed in 1905, the 7-foot by 12-foot oil painting replaced an 1875 version that was destroyed while on display in the Limestone Capitol when it burned in 1881. It is an extremely detailed, although not entirely historically accurate, interpretation of The Battle of the Alamo, a pivotal event during the Texas Revolution. During the course of a 13-day siege in 1836, all but two of the approximately 187 Texians, under the command of James Bowie and William B. Travis, lost their lives defending the fort at the Alamo Mission near San Antonio de Béxar against Mexican General General Santa Anna’s army of more than 5,000 troops. This painting shows the heroic Texians including David Crockett (during his last stand swinging "Old Betsy" protecting women and children–lower right corner), the ill James Bowie (using his trademark knife–lower left corner) and Commander William B. Travis (as he is stabbed in the back–upper right corner). In actuality, Travis, pictured here larger-than-life, was one of the first killed in the battle which occurred on March 6, 1836.

The Senate Chamber, located on the second floor east wing of the Texas State Capitol, is where the thirty-one state senators meet during Texas legislative sessions to work with the House of Representatives enacting the laws of the state. Restored to its c. 1910 appearance, the Senate Chamber still contains the original walnut desks purchased in 1888 for the Lieutenant Governor, Secretary of the Senate and 31 senators from the A. H. Andrews and Company of Chicago. The Lieutenant Governor’s desk is located in front of a reproduction drapery treatment and a mid-nineteenth century portrait of Stephen F. Austin by an unknown artist.

The Texas State Capitol, anchoring 22-acres of landscaped grounds originally designated as Capitol Square in 1839, was designed in 1881 by architect Elijah E. Myers, and was constructed from 1882 to 1888 under the direction of civil engineer Reuben Lindsay Walker. The Italian Renaissance Revival seat of Texas state government houses the two the chambers of the Texas Legislature and the office of the governor.

Washington | Posted by admin

Dolce Melodie: chamber music and more!

January 13th, 2014

Dolce Melodie: chamber music and more!
Event on 2014-01-23 19:00:00
Enjoy a fine evening of chamber music featuring such composers as Mozart, Schumann, and Ravel, as well as more contemporary numbers on Thursday, January 23 at 7:00 p.m. in the Library’s Barth Community Room. This special performance is part of the Library’s new series of free quarterly concerts, featuring a range of musical styles and instruments, brought to one and all by the Friends of the Crowell Public Library and the San Marino Music Center. Dolce Melodie features founder Elizabeth Walker on flute, Desiree Hazley on violin, Jonathan Wang on clarinet and Susanna Sujin Kwon on cello.

Elizabeth Walker has traveled through the U.S., the Bahamas, and Australia playing flute. She graduated from Azusa Pacific University with the Bachelors in Music Flute Performance and was a member of the Symphony Orchestra. Since graduation she has performed throughout Southern California and has been a part of the Inland Valley Symphony, Orange County Wind Symphony as well as Dolce Melodie. She has been teaching for many years.

Desiree Hazley graduated with a Bachelors of Music in Violin Performance at Azusa Pacific University. In 2012, she had the opportunity to study music with the concertmaster of the Heidelberg Philharmonic for three months in Heidelberg, Germany. Desiree has worked on many projects with artists including: Stevie Nicks, Dave Stewart and she is the violinist of the gypsy jazz band, Aux Amis. She teaches violin and plays in the Claremont Symphony and Riverside Philharmonic.

Jonathan Wang started his music career at Citrus College where he was the lead alto sax in the Blue Note Jazz Orchestra, and lead clarinet in the Sierra Wind Symphony. Jonathan has performed throughout California, Arizona, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, and Hawaii and is also a graduate of Azusa Pacific University and plans to pursue his teaching credential. Performance groups include University Choir and Orchestra, Jazz Ensemble & Wind Ensemble and Bodhi Rock.

Susanna Sujin Kwon has been a cellist in the hit show Glee and is currently the main cello instructor at San Marino Music Center. She is pursuing her Bachelor's degree at Azusa Pacific University in cello performance, studying with Marek Szpakiewicz, as well as a Bachelor's in sports psychology. She plans to continue studying for her Master's in both fields, and a Doctorate's in psychology.

You won’t want to miss this blissful evening of free music at Crowell Library. Light refreshments will be served. For more information on the San Marino Music Center, visit: http://www.sanmarinomusiccenter.com/index.html.

at Crowell Public Library
1809 Huntington Drive
San Marino, United States

Washington | Posted by admin

Austin – Texas State Capitol: Senate Chamber – Barbara Jordan

December 25th, 2013

Check out these Senate images:

Austin – Texas State Capitol: Senate Chamber – Barbara Jordan
Senate
Image by wallyg
This portrait of Barbara Jordan, hanging in the Texas Seante Chamber, was painted by Edsel M. Cramer in 1973. Barbara Jordan (1936-1996) was a leader of the Civil Rights movement, the first African American elected to the Texas Senate after Reconstruction, representing Houston, Harris County from 1967-1973, and the first southern black female elected to the United States House of Representatives.

The Senate Chamber, located on the second floor east wing of the Texas State Capitol, is where the thirty-one state senators meet during Texas legislative sessions to work with the House of Representatives enacting the laws of the state. Restored to its c. 1910 appearance, the Senate Chamber still contains the original walnut desks purchased in 1888 for the Lieutenant Governor, Secretary of the Senate and 31 senators from the A. H. Andrews and Company of Chicago. The Lieutenant Governor’s desk is located in front of a reproduction drapery treatment and a mid-nineteenth century portrait of Stephen F. Austin by an unknown artist. Two large paintings by noted early Texas artist Henry Arthur McArdle anchor the west side of the room.

The Texas State Capitol, anchoring 22-acres of landscaped grounds originally designated as Capitol Square in 1839, was designed in 1881 by architect Elijah E. Myers, and was constructed from 1882 to 1888 under the direction of civil engineer Reuben Lindsay Walker. The Italian Renaissance Revival seat of Texas state government houses the two the chambers of the Texas Legislature and the office of the governor.

Michigan Senate Finance Committee Hearing on SB 34 Photo by Michigan Municipal League
Senate
Image by Michigan Municipal League (MML)
Mayor Abdul Haidous of the city of Wayne and Sterling Heights Mayor Richard Notte were in Lansing on Thursday, with Michigan Municipal League staffer Andy Schor, to testify at the Senate Finance Committee’s first hearing on SB 34, which would eliminate the personal property tax. Read the Feb. 3rd Action Alert (http://www.mml.org/advocacy/alerts_advisories/2011_02_4_action.html) which explains the League’s position on the bill, and the steps local leaders are taking to make sure committee members understand the devastating impact this would have on local public services should it be enacted without a replacement for the revenues to local communities. For more about the League and what we do go to mml.org.

Washington | Posted by admin

Fortas Chamber Music Concert: Takács Quartet: Bartók Quartets 2, 4, 6

December 16th, 2013

Fortas Chamber Music Concert: Takács Quartet: Bartók Quartets 2, 4, 6
Event on 2014-01-22 19:30:00

Following their March 2012 Fortas debut in The Music of Budapest, Prague, and Vienna, the Takács returns to perform a not-to-be-missed cycle of Bartók's string quartets, Nos. 1, 3, & 5 (Jan. 21) and Nos. 2, 4, & 6 (Jan. 22).

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Takács Quartet
Edward Dusinberre, violin
Karóly Schranz, violin
Geraldine Walther, viola
András Fejér, cello
 
"The Takács have the ability to make you believe that there's no other possible way the music should go."
Gramophone

Following their March 2012 Fortas debut, as part of The Music of Budapest, Prague, and Vienna, the Takács Quartet returns to perform a not-to-be-missed cycle of Bartók's complete string quartets, Nos. 1, 3, & 5 (Jan. 21 – click here to get tickets) and Nos. 2, 4, & 6 (Jan. 22). In that 2012 concert, they played the Bartók Quartet No. 4, which led the Washington Post to exclaim, "There is no group, live or on disc, I would rather hear in these densely constructed, challenging, but rewarding pieces. The players attacked the Fourth Quartet with a bite in the tone but never overbearing harshness."

Hailed as "chamber music royalty" (Sydney Morning Herald), the Takács Quartet plays with a unique blend of drama, warmth, and humor, combining four distinct musical personalities to bring fresh insights to the string quartet repertoire. Since their founding in 1975, the Bartók Quartets have been at the heart of the Takács Quartet's repertoire and it was a Gramophone Award–winning recording of those works that really put their name on the international map in 1998.

at Kennedy Center Terrace Theater
2700 F Street NW
Washington, United States

Washington | Posted by admin

He’s Gone Away Concert in Ainsworth by Red Cedar Chamber Music

December 6th, 2013

He’s Gone Away Concert in Ainsworth by Red Cedar Chamber Music
Event on 2014-02-20 18:00:00
Thursday, February 20, 2014; 6:00 PM – 8:30 PM
Red Cedar Chamber Music

Flutist Jan Boland, guitarist John Dowdall and narrator Michael Zahs present He's Gone Away, commemorating the sesquicentennial of the American Civil War.

Separation and uncertainty followed by joyful reunion or heartbreaking loss were documented in countless letters and songs during the American Civil War. He's Gone Away weaves together a tapestry of music, letters and narrative portraying the emotional hardships faced by Civil War soldiers and the wives, sweethearts and families they left behind.

Performed on antique musical instruments from the period (gut strung guitar and wooden flutes) with readings from Michael Zahs personal, unpublished collection of Civil War letters.

The performers bring an Iowa perspective to the Civil War era, interspersing some of the earliest tunes published in Iowa with conversation about the impact of the war.

Presented in collaboration with the Ainsworth Opera House. Concert preceded by a homemade supper served at 6:00 p.m.

Sponsored by the Washington County Riverboat Foundation and The National Endowment for the Arts with additional support from the Ainsworth Opera House.

at Ainsworth Opera House
248 Railroad St.
Ainsworth, United States

Washington | Posted by admin

Fear Factor Moments | The Confidence Chamber

November 17th, 2013

Fear Factor Moments | The Confidence Chamber

Military recruits are often exposed to tear gas in so-called “Confidence Chambers.” A single canister of this CS gas can disperse a crowd of a hundred in a m…


Amazing Videos

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