Posts Tagged ‘George’

CBE Classic – Kansas, Georgia, George Washington, UAB

August 12th, 2016

CBE Classic – Kansas, Georgia, George Washington, UAB
Event on 2016-11-21 18:30:00

at Sprint Center
1407 Grand Boulevard
Kansas City, United States

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CBE Classic – Kansas, Georgia, George Washington, UAB

August 12th, 2016

CBE Classic – Kansas, Georgia, George Washington, UAB
Event on 2016-11-22 18:30:00

at Sprint Center
1407 Grand Boulevard
Kansas City, United States

Washington | Posted by

Teaching About George Washington

June 2nd, 2016

No generation in American history has matched that of the founding era for its array of talented and influential political thinkers and actors. John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and George Washington all possessed certain traits of character and intellect that significantly shaped the new United States of America and its direction for generations that followed. Among these personalities, George Washington is the most difficult for students to know. Compared to Jefferson, Hamilton, or most other important historical figures, our common images of Washington — seen on the dollar bill and quarter, crossing the Delaware River, or enshrined in the impersonal Washington Monument — are cold and distant. Today’s perceptions of Washington seem to validate Ralph Waldo Emerson’s maxim, “Every hero becomes a bore at last.”
Do most students understand the importance of George Washington as a military and political leader during a time that demanded extraordinary leadership? The bicentennial of Washington’s death in 1999 is an appropriate time to reflect upon his role and place in the school curriculum.
THE IMPORTANCE OF THE “GREAT PERSON” IN HISTORY
By what criteria should educators decide to emphasize a person in history? Extraordinary goodness or virtue should not be the sole standard (Patrick 1992, 12-13). Instead, the touchstone for inclusion should be whether an individual’s achievements have significantly shaped events in his or her country or the world. By this criterion, George Washington merits strong emphasis in the school curriculum. Richard Brookhiser reminds us in “Founding Father: Rediscovering George Washington” (1996, 9) that teachers often stress impersonal forces of history and neglect individuals: “Thus the American Revolution was a triumph of Democracy or the Enlightenment. As reductionists, we believe that the historical figures, who floated like chips in the intellectual backwash, attached themselves to the cause for trivial motives, often sordid. We have lost the conviction that ideas require men to bring them to earth.”
George Washington was one such “great person” whose life and character helped to bring grand ideas about people and governments to earth at the core of a new nation. Washington, however, was not without his faults. Though he disapproved of slavery and ultimately freed all his slaves in his will, he and his wife, Martha, owned more than 300 slaves. And while generally a man of very sound judgment in military and political affairs, he made serious mistakes, such as his precarious disposition of troops on Long Island in April of 1776, and his support of the Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798. Nevertheless, he was a person whose personal attributes and life significantly shaped the United States of America and the world, and from whom students have much to learn.
WASHINGTON AND THE SCHOOL CURRICULUM
Leadership is a key concept upon which to base treatment of George Washington in the school curriculum. Although usually reluctant to assume leading roles, Washington, from a very early age until his death, was an extraordinary leader. Washington’s capacity to lead the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War, to preside at the 1787 Philadelphia Constitutional Convention, and to serve as the first President of the United States manifests his character — a word nearly synonymous in his own time with reputation (Elkins and McKitrick 1993, 37).
As a member of Virginia’s wealthy planter class, Washington was well aware of the importance of “character” early in his life. Colonial Virginian society blurred distinctions between public and private spheres of life for its wealthy members. The affairs of a person of Washington’s stature affected too many people for almost any aspect of his life to be considered private. Washington was connected to a large group of people in and around Mount Vernon that depended upon his actions and leadership. In turn, Washington depended upon his neighbors, large and small, to elect him to the House of Burgesses, which, in eighteenth century Virginia, ratified a person’s reputation (Elkins and McKitrick 1993, 38). As he grew in stature, Washington’s character continued to serve as the vital foundation for his ability to lead (Lipset 1998, 28-30).
During the American War of Independence, General Washington showed a keen sense of martial leadership. He was acutely conscious of the strategic importance of mobility and strived to keep his ill-equipped army from being pinned down in defending fixed positions against the more powerful British forces. More impressive still was his leadership in simply keeping together an army that usually lost on the battlefield, and whose soldiers were anxious for an excuse to return to their families, farms, or other occupations.
As a popular general, Washington could have used his power to impose his will over the civilian leadership, as did Napoleon Bonaparte in France and Simon Bolivar in Latin America. But Washington understood the republican basis of his power, and that enduringly successful leaders depend on the support and trust of the people they serve.
Washington’s leadership and understanding of power brought legitimacy to a new United States of America. New nation-states often suffer, according to Seymour Martin Lipset, from the problem of weak legitimacy (1998, 27). Lacking the traditional bases of authority of established nation-states, a charismatic leader is required to bring legitimate authority to a new nation-state. Washington consciously employed his character and popularity to “create respect for national authority and to bolster the legitimacy of the new nation” (Lipset 1998, 27).
Washington’s legacy to the presidency and to the Republic was his use of his charismatic leadership to legitimize the authority of the new government while resisting despotic temptations that other charismatic leaders, such as Napoleon and Bolivar, could not resist. Washington understood that a fledgling republic required a leader willing to provide it a national character and set of values (e.g., rule of law, respect for authority, and public virtue) that would serve it well during his presidency and beyond. He also understood that such a legacy would elevate his fame and place in history beyond anything he might accomplish as a king or despot. These aspects of Washington’s character and accomplishments should be at the core of the school curriculum in the United States.

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George MacDonald and the Crisis of Doubt

May 1st, 2016

George MacDonald and the Crisis of Doubt
Event on 2017-02-02 00:00:00
Wade Center 130 Bakke Auditorium,Wade Center Classroom
Thursday, February 2, 2017, 7 – 9:30pm

The Marion E. Wade Center at Wheaton College will present the second lecture in the 2016-2017 Ken and Jean Hansen Lectureship on February 2, 2017. This is the second of three lectures in a series titled The Rose Fire: George MacDonald in the Age of Miracles by Dr. Timothy Larsen. It will be followed by a final talk, "George MacDonald and the Reenchantment of the World" on March 23, 2017. All lectures will be at 7pm in the Wade Center's Bakke Auditorium. 

Dr. Timothy Larsen is McManis Professor of Christian Thought, Wheaton College, and an Honorary Research Fellow, the University of Wales Trinity Saint David. A Fellow of the Royal Historical Society, he has been a Visiting Fellow at Trinity College, Cambridge, and All Souls College, Oxford. His books include Crisis of Doubt: Honest Faith in Nineteenth-Century England (OUP, 2006), A People of One Book: The Bible and the Victorians (OUP, 2011), and The Slain God: Anthropologists and the Christian Faith (OUP, 2014). He is a Contributing Editor to Books & Culture, and articles of his have also appeared in the Times Literary Supplement, CNN, Christian Century, World, Christianity Today, The Tablet, Inside Higher Ed, Chronicle of Higher Education, and the Wall Street Journal.

The Ken and Jean Hansen Lectureship is an annual faculty lecture series named in honor of former Wheaton College trustee Ken Hansen and his wife Jean, and endowed in their memory by Walter and Darlene Hansen.

The lectures will be held in the Marion E. Wade Center's Bakke Auditorium and are free and open to the public. The Wade Center is located on northwest corner of Wheaton College's campus on the corner of Washington St. and Lincoln Ave. in Wheaton. For more information, contact the Wade Center at 630.752.5908 or wade@wheaton.edu.

at Wheaton College
501 College Ave
Wheaton, United States

Washington | Posted by Victoria Addington

George Washington Colonials vs. VCU Rams

January 8th, 2016

George Washington Colonials vs. VCU Rams
Occasion on 2016-02-27 12:30:00
NCAAB Baseball

at Charles E. Smith Athletic Center
600 22nd Street NW
Washington, United States

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George Washington Alcohol Perhaps Not Far Off

December 24th, 2015

Lots of people are unaware that most from the Founding Fathers of nation additionally brewed unique beer. Thomas Jefferson’s dish has actually really been aware of light of the time lately after becoming revived by a nearby brewing business. On the other hand, George Washington’s whiskey distillery is much better grasped than their alcohol brewing exploits, though he did make his individual beer. Today Washington’s own private alcohol recipe will undoubtedly be available to people once again. A partnership between ny Public Library (the owner concerning the initial recipe) and Coney Island Brewing business brings back a (very) restricted release of this historic liquor.

In many, simply 25 gallons of George Washington’s alcohol will be available and it’ll never be available commercially. The sole place that you may get mitts utilizing one of these brews is once you were able to consider the Rattle N Hum in Manhattan or you caused that it is towards the nyc Public Library’s 100th special birthday in NYC. The brewers in charge of taking Washington’s recipe back to fermented life stayed real towards the first meal if you can, though several tweaks needed to be made. The best brew is a rich porter and utilizes small group black malts including specialty hops to produce a phenomenal alcohol.

Fortitude’s Founding dad Brew, because it has been known as, is a taste through the final, a glimpse towards the mind and character of 1 about the country’s crucial historic figures plus an incredible modern-day development. This dedication to recreating this historic brew can also be more apparent whenever you read Washington’s very brief meal. These is roofed on a scrap of paper held within the ny Public Library’s Washington Archives:

To Make Small Beer

Take a sizable Siffer [Sifter] full of Bran Hops towards Taste. — Boil these 3 hours from then on stress out 30 Gall[ons] into a cooler invest 3 Gall[ons] Molasses even though the alcohol is Scalding hot or in other words draw the Melasses into the cooler & St[r]ain the alcohol into it while boiling Hot. Allow this stand till it is actually little more than blood-warm then devote a quart of Yea[s]t if weather is very Cold cover it above with a Blank[et] & allow it assist the colder a day after that put it into the Cask — leave the bung available till it’s very nearly don[e] performing — Bottle it the period Week it had been Brewed.

Poto Cervesia,
Dustin Canestorp

Dustin Canestorp could be the Founder and General associated with Beer Army. Enter on the ranks for the Beer Army at BeerArmy.com. Simply take a stand and allow globe understand your part. If you are likely to take in, take in BEER!

 

Music | Posted by Victoria Addington

Tennessee Volunteers vs. George Washington Colonials

October 26th, 2015

Tennessee Volunteers vs. George Washington Colonials
Occasion on 2015-11-27 21:00:00
NCAAB Baseball

at Barclays Center
620 Atlantic Ave
Brooklyn, United States

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George Washington Jones

October 10th, 2015

George Washington Jones
Occasion on 2015-11-05 18:00:00
6-8 pm.

at Community Smith
866 W. Peachtree St. NW
Atlanta, United States

Washington | Posted by admin

George Washington Beer Coming Soon

May 21st, 2015

Many people are unaware that many of the Founding Fathers regarding the country also brewed their beer. Thomas Jefferson’s recipe has actually heard of light of day in recent years after being revived by an area brewing business. On the other hand, George Washington’s whiskey distillery is better known than his beer brewing exploits, though he did brew his or her own beer. Now Washington’s own personal beer recipe will undoubtedly be open to the general public once again. A partnership involving the ny Public Library (the holder for the original recipe) and Coney Island Brewing business provides right back a (very) restricted release of this historic alcohol.

In every, only 25 gallons of George Washington’s alcohol is available and it’ll not be available commercially. The actual only real destination that one could get your mitts on one of those brews is when you managed to look at the Rattle N Hum in Manhattan or if you managed to get toward ny Public Library’s 100th birthday celebration in NYC. The brewers responsible for bringing Washington’s recipe back once again to fermented life remained real toward initial recipe whenever possible, though a few tweaks needed to be made. The last brew is a rich porter and uses tiny batch dark malts and specialty hops to create an amazing alcohol.

Fortitude’s Founding Father Brew, as it will be called, is a style through the past, a glimpse to the mind and character of 1 associated with nation’s primary historical figures and also an amazing modern innovation. This dedication to recreating this historic brew is more obvious once you read Washington’s really brief recipe. These is included on a scrap of paper held in nyc Public Library’s Washington Archives:

In Order To Make Small Alcohol

Simply take a large Siffer [Sifter] filled with Bran Hops to your flavor. — Boil these 3 hours then strain out 30 Gall[ons] into a cooler put in 3 Gall[ons] Molasses as the Beer is Scalding hot or rather draw the Melasses in to the cooler & St[r]ain the alcohol onto it while boiling Hot. Let this stand till it is bit more than Blood warm then devote a quart of Yea[s]t if the Weather is very cool address it over with a Blank[et] & allow it to work with the Cooler twenty four hours then place it into the Cask — keep the bung open till its nearly don[e] Working — Bottle it that time Week it had been Brewed.

Poto Cervesia,
Dustin Canestorp

Dustin Canestorp could be the Founder and General of the Beer Army. Join the ranks associated with the Beer Army at BeerArmy.com. Take a stand and let the world know your role. If you should be planning to take in, take in BEER!

 

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George Washington’s Yorktown: From Mount Vernon to Victory

April 17th, 2015

George Washington’s Yorktown: From Mount Vernon to Victory
Occasion on 2015-05-03 00:00:00
For hours Library

Join united states for a two-day trip and battlefield excursion experience that highlights the strategic, operational, and tactical levels of the Yorktown campaign. Taught by noted historian and armed forces expert, Dr. Ricardo Herrera from US Command and General Staff university, participants will gain a deeper knowledge of the interplay between leadership, planning, and execution that lead the United states coalition forces from Mount Vernon to Victory.Learn More Tickets

at Mount Vernon
3200 Mount Vernon Memorial Highway
Mount Vernon, United States

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