Posts Tagged ‘Photos’

Nice Washington Concert photos

August 26th, 2016

Some cool washington concert images:

M-Pire Of Evil at U Street Music Hall
washington concert
Image by Metal Chris
This is the UK metal band M-Pire Of Evil when they played at the U Street Music Hall in Washington DC on Easter Sunday 8 April 2012. They were opening for the band Onslaught and this was the final concert of their 2012 North American tour. M-Pire Of Evil has two former members of the legendary band Venom, and as such they played a lot of Venom songs in their set.

climbing the tree
washington concert
Image by Melody Kramer

Holiday Orchestra Concert with 5th and 6th Grade Orchestra (Saline, Michigan, December 19, 2013)
washington concert
Image by cseeman
The Holiday Orchestra Concert with 5th and 6th Grade Orchestras directed by Ben Culver. The concert (which was the first one for the 5th Grade Orchestra) featured Les Sharon, David Raft and Laura Washington as narrators. The concert was at the Saline Middle School.

Music | Posted by Fabrice Dollmach

Nice FM Radio photos

August 24th, 2016

Some cool FM Radio images:

20150502 – yardsale haul – yard sale booty – Oranjello & Lisa Simpson action figure – IMG_0319
FM Radio
Image by Rev. Xanatos Satanicos Bombasticos (ClintJCL)
When live gives Lisa Simpson a Jeffrey, she strokes the furry wall.

Lisa Simpson action figure, Oranjello the cat.
cartoon: The Simpsons.

upstairs, Clint and Carolyn’s house, Alexandria, Virginia.

May 2, 2015.

… Read my blog at ClintJCL at wordpress.com
… Read Carolyn’s blog at CarolynCASL at wordpress.com

… Read my yard sale-related blogposts at clintjcl dot wordpress dot com/category/yard-sales/

BACKSTORY: Got up around 8:50AM, made it out driving by ~9:15 and went out until 2:27PM for a total of 5.25 hours. Spent .55 plus ~.66 gas for 40.0 miles of driving (14 mpg @ .73/G), for a total cost of .21. We drove to 24 yard sales, stopping at 15 (62%) of them. We made 44 purchases (69 items) for a total estimated value of 4.81, leading to a profit/savings of 3.60. So in essence, we multiplied our .21 investment by 11.44X. (Also, if you think about it, the profit counts for even more when you consider that we have to earn ~0 on the job, pre-tax, in order to take home the 9 in cash that we saved. How long does 0 of disposable income take to earn, vs the 5.25 hrs we spent here?) Anyway, this works out to a *post-tax* "wage" of 4.26/hr as a couple or .13/hr per person.

THE TAKE:

.00: lawn darts, Regent "Slider" Jarts, model 73929, in box, part no. 01-73927, Regent SportsCorporation, Hauppauge, NY 11787 (EV:0)

.00: (8) generic folding chairs (EV:$ 11.99)

.00: ottoman, leather, 18.5×18.5×16.5" high, with storage area (EV:$ 51.00)

.00: wooden multishelf unit, 30x24x5" deep, 7 shelves (EV:$ 29.00) (not quite this, but I can’t find anything more exact)

.00: mechanic’s creeper, on wheels (EV:$ 24.49)

.00: clock radio, Proton 320, Model #320, Serial # P32178259 (EV:$ 22.83)

.00: fan, adjusts from 33" high to 47" high, white, plastic, Galaxy, turns out it doesn’t work. (EV:$ 32.69), but we are counting it as

Radio Sweet FM
FM Radio
Image by verni22im
Encore et toujours, les formateurs sont sollicités pour prendre la pose. Photos-souvenirs obligent!


Deux semaines de formation pour des journalistes radio camerounais sur le thème" comment couvrir les élections présidentielles d’octobre 2011?"
Plus de photos de photos sur la formation sur le compte FlickR de la "Deutsche Welle Akademie Africa":
www.flickr.com/photos/dw-akademie-africa/sets/72157627159…

.00 since it didn’t work.

.00: lamp, silver, metal clip on, 9" extension, model hbp1001c-109, 12746 SKU: 717-880 "DLC" 0-4633584495-7, date: 201203, E91675 (EV:$ 28.49)

.00: bag of hotel toiletries, 11 bottles of lotion (SolTerre), 17 bottles of shampoo (SolTerre), 16 bars of soap (SolTerre), 1 small container of Morton’s salt and 1 small container of Morton’s pepper (EV:$ 21.99)

.00: car tray, interior, Keller, 2 cup holders, 10×16"(EV:$ 27.48), it’s not quite this, but I can’t find a closer match.

.00: cordless vacuum, SharK-15.6 volts, sv7514 (EV:$ 28.99)

.00: mirror, magnifying, wall-mount, ConAir The Classique Collection #41742, 8" diameter, 5x magnification, tri-fold arm extends 12.5" from wall, outer arm swivals 360 degrees, (EV:$ 42.74)

.00: extension cord, white, 2-prong, 6ft, vendor# 64646 (EV:$ 5.32)

.00: guitar, First Act Discovery, missing 3 strings, FG 125, 31"x10" (EV:$ 1.04)

.00: game, roller dice, Sportcraft, model no. 11005, barcode 04473610053 (EV:.01 price tag)

.00: hanging metal decoration, 18 point metal star, welded, very sharp and pointy, 18" across (EV:$ 81.90)

.00: (6) bottles of hair spray, flourescent, Star Quality, 5 bottles 3.5 oz each (3 purple, 1 green, 1 silver), 1 bottle 3.0 oz (yellow) (EV:.40 each price tags)

.00: carpet freshener, Glade, 42.6 oz (EV:$ 5.29)

.00: toy, Sit ‘n Spin, blue with cow face. PlaySkool, 2013 Hasbro (EV:$ 18.89)

.00: toy, airplane, some sort of hard plastic material, WestAir N360SE, 17.5×18.25" (EV:?)

.00: toy, airplane, some sort of hard plastic material, Piedmont Commuter, N332SB, 14.25×18.25(EV:?)

.00: pan,skillet, flat, square, Calphalon, 11×11 (EV:$ 19.95)

.00: game, Blockbuster Movie Game, plays with any movie (EV:$ 5.00)

.00: 2 speakers, 5" cubes, Optimus XTS 40, Cat no 40-1991, wire kind (EV:$ 13.26)

.00: picture frame, 15.5×12.5, wood trim (EV:$ 22.99)

.00: snow shovel, definitely needed after both of ours broke this past winter! (EV:$ 8.98)

.50: vinegar, White House, half a 64oz bottle (EV:.70 at Peapod)

.50: wrapping paper, 40" long roll (EV:.00)

.25: shirt, holographic, Disney Camp Rock, style #k2826t0005 (EV:$ 9.00) Not an exact match.

.25: toy, Simpsons, Lisa Simpson, Burger King, 2011, light up red chest, 3"hx2"w (EV:$ 5.99)

.25: toy,Adventure Time, Jake, McDonalds, with spring chest, 3.5"x2.25(EV:$ 1.00)

.25: instrument, recorder, pink clear plastic, Yamaha (EV:$ 4.97)

.25: toy, top, gyroscope, with plastic case, CBOCS (EV:.99 price tag)

.10: glue, Elmer’s Wood Glue, 8 fl oz (EV:$ 1.99 for 4 fl oz so .98 for 8 fl oz)

.10: lint brush, Magic Brush, Helmac Products, yellow plastic handle (EV:$ 6.45)

.10: toy, matchbox car, Cheerios, Chex, 43, blue and yellow, 3"x1"(EV:$ 1.04)

$ FREE: lamp, 28" high, 11" wide (EV:.00)

$ FREE: carpet, for outside (EV:.00)

$ FREE: Sit ‘n Spin, green with red face, PlaySkool, 2004 Hasbro, requires batteries and has button but it doesn’t seem to work (EV:$ 18.89)

$ FREE: paint, white, maybe 1/4 of a gallon of Glidden Ultra Hide Latex Eggshell (EV:$ 2.99 rationale:.97 for a gallon)

$ FREE: candy, Ice Chips Margarita, sweetened with xylitol, 1.76 oz, shrinkwrapped (EV:$ 27.95 for 6, or 4.65 each)

$ FREE: jar, plastic, locking top, DynaWare 10×5.5" (EV:$ 10.19)

$ FREE: 7 manga books, Manga Shakespeare, Julius Caesar, Othello, Hamlet, Macbeth, Romeo & Juliet, The Tempest, A MidSummer Night’s Dream (EV:.95 price tag for 4 of them, .95 price tag for 3 of them)

$ FREE: wig, blonde with darker streaks, the lady called it a "Miley Cyris" wig (EV:$ 5.85)

Radio | Posted by

Nice Washington photos

August 21st, 2016

A few nice Washington images I found:

DC Dream
Washington
Image by zachstern

T-38 Aircraft Fly Over Washington (201204050001HQ)
Washington
Image by NASA HQ PHOTO
A NASA T-38 training jet is seen as it flies over Washington, DC, Thursday, April 5, 2012. NASA, in cooperation with the Federal Aviation Administration, conducted training and photographic flights over the DC metropolitan area. T-38 aircraft have been used for astronaut training for more than 30 years as they allow pilots and mission specialists to think quickly in changing situations, mental experiences the astronauts say are critical to practicing for the rigors of spaceflight. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

Washington | Posted by Fabrice Dollmach

Nice FM Radio photos

August 19th, 2016

A few nice FM Radio images I found:

Image from page 472 of “QST” (1915)
FM Radio
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: qstamer00amer
Title: QST
Year: 1915 (1910s)
Authors: American Radio Relay League
Subjects: Radio Radio
Publisher: [Newington, Conn., etc., American Radio Relay League]
Contributing Library: Internet Archive
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
nswcr to operat ir.instnit tors and the Transitron Line at yout local parts distributor,tor more complete technical Information write TRANSITRON,.Nc 154 Spring Street New York 12, N.Y. >SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS3SSSSSSSSSS^ SOUTHEASTERN HAMS! We stock nationally advertised Ham parts CURLE RADIO SUPPLY 439 Broad Street, Chattanooga, Tennessee406 Meridian Street, Huntsville, Alabama RADIO COURSES FCC LICENSE PREPARATION• COMMERCIAL • CODE BRUSH-UP . AMATEUR . THEORY TELEVISION AND RADIO SERVICING Personal Counseling Approved for Veterans r|U||»l| TRADE & TECHNICAL?^•* SCHOOL of N.Y. 15 West 63 St. New York 23, N. Y.EN 2-8117 Catalog T. O. Look Carefully – beforeyou toot – HI !!

Text Appearing After Image:
r^ lAMPKIN 105-B MICROMETER FREQUENCYMETER . . . Measures crystal-controlled trans-mitters, all channels, 0.1 to 500 MC. MeetsFCC mobile specs. Weight ]2% lbs. Width 13.Price 0.00. UMPKIN 205- A FM MODUUTION METCR . . Indicotes FM voice deviation, :t25 KC, oilfrequencies, 25 to 500 MC. Meets FCC mobilespecs. Weight 14 lbs. Width 12//.Price 0.00. Today you have fo look carefully fo be sure a mobile whip is cot for a ham band. Thereare close to half a million commercial mobile rigs already licensed . . . with thousandsadded every month. Each one means folding money to the FCC-required maintenance man. . . quite often an amateur. Thats why LAMPKIN METERS .. . with a 2nd class commercialticket . . . can mean money to you. NEW booklet: HOW TO MAKE MONEY IN MOBILE-RADIO MAINTENANCE! For your copy.. .plus com-plete data on Lompkin meters… moil coupon today!

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

2010 Millennium H-3 45, Triple Slide
FM Radio
Image by MillenniumLuxuryCoaches
MODEL2010 Millennium H-3 45, Triple Slide
LENGTH45.0 FT
TYPEPrevost
ENGINE TYPEDetroit Diesel Series
FUEL TYPEDiesel
SLIDESThree (3)
COLORCustom
STOCK NUM#1298

Fully Loaded
Triple slide w/ two rear slides
Rear bath

CHASSIS SPECS

GENERAL
LENGTH, OVERALL45.0 FT.
WHEELBASE316.12 IN.
WIDTH, OVERALL102.0 IN.
HEIGHT, OVERALL149.0 IN.
FLOOR-TO-CEILING HEIGHT 83.0 IN
CABIN FLOOR HEIGHT (FROM THE GROUND)63.0 IN.
USABLE CABIN FLAT FLOOR LENGTH
(NO WHEEL HUMPS)37.5 FT.
UNDER-FLOOR STORAGe 505 CU.FT.
UNDER-FLOOR COMPARTMENTS DOORS WIDTH 48.5 IN.
ENTRANCE DOOR WIDTH 27.0 IN.
STEP HEIGHT 14.0 IN.
GROUND CLEARANCE 11.0 IN.
OVERHANG (INCL. BUMPER) — FRONT 75.0 IN.
OVERHANG (INCL. BUMPER) — REAR107.0 IN.
TURNING RADIUS41.8 FT.
BODY CONSTRUCTION (STRUCTURE) INTEGRAL STAINLESS STEEL
BODY CONSTRUCTION (OUTER SHELL)FIBER COMPOSITE
BODY CONSTRUCTION (SUB-FRAME)LOW-ALLOY/HIGH TENSILE STEEL
FUEL TANK (US GALS.) 230
FUEL FILLER NECKS ON BOTH SIDES
GROSS VEHICLE WEIGHT RATING (LBS.)
54,500
AXLE DESIGN LOAD CAPACITY (LBS.) – FRONT
18,000
AXLE DESIGN LOAD CAPACITY (LBS.) – DRIVE
22,500
AXLE DESIGN LOAD CAPACITY (LBS.) – TAG
14,000
CHASSIS WET WEIGHT – WITH DRIVER A/C (LBS.) 31,140
A/C REFRIGERANT 134 A
TIRES AND WHEELS
MICHELIN 315/80R22.5 (DRIVE)MICHELIN 365/70R22.5 (FRONT & TAG)
ALCOA ALUMINUM RIMS
22.5 X 10.5 IN. (FRONT & TAG AXLES)22.5 X 9 IN. (DRIVE AXLE)

POWERTRAIN
DETROIT DIESEL SERIES 60 W/EGR 14L-515HP (5-YR. WARRANTY)
3-SPEED ENGINE COOLING FAN
ALLISON WORLD B500, 6-SPEED AUTO. TRANS. (5-YR. WARRANTY)
CRUISE CONTROL
ALLISON HYDRAULIC TRANSMISSION RETARDER
PNEUMATIC DRIVE BELTS TENSIONERS
TURBO BOOST GAUGE
ENGINE COOLANT FILTER
RACOR FUEL FILTER

BRAKES
ALL-DISC BRAKES WITH ABS AND ELECTRONIC STABILITY PROGRAM
FRONT WHEELS BRAKE BOOSTERSTYPE 27
DRIVE WHEELS BRAKE BOOSTERSTYPE 24-24
TAG WHEELS BRAKE BOOSTERSTYPE 14-16
PARKING BRAKE BOOSTER ON TAG WHEELS

STEERING AND SUSPENSION
SMART WHEEL
PNEUMATIC TILT & TELESCOPIC STEERING WHEEL
ZF SERVOCOM CONSTANT POWER STEERING
ZF SERVOCOMTRONIC VARIABLE POWER STEERING
INDEPENDENT SUSPENSION SYSTEM
STEERING SLAVE CYLINDER
FRONT & DRIVE AXLES SWAY BARS
INTEGRATED PNEUMATIC LEVEL-LOW LEVELING SYSTEM
LIFTABLE TAG AXLE

ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
FULLY MULTIPLEXED ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
12-VOLT EXT. LIGHTING
24-VOLT MAIN SYSTEM
SHELL ALTERNATOR (DRIVER A/C) 140 AMPS
MILLENNIUM INSTALLED HOUSE ALTERNATOR 335 AMPS

FACTORY-INSTALLED OPTIONAL EQUIPMENT
FACTORY SLIDE-OUTS (ALL-ELECTRICAL) 3 SLIDES
CURBSIDE FRONT NONE REAR 1’6” X 10’ 10”
ROADSIDE FRONT 2’ 6” REAR 1’6” X 10’ 10”
HIGH-INTENSITY HEADLIGHTS
FOG LIGHTS
RAMCO REMOTE CHROME HEATED REARVIEW MIRRORS
CENTRAL ELECTRICAL DOOR LOCKING SYSTEM
REMOTE KEYLESS LOCKING (ENTRANCE DOOR)
REMOTE KEYLESS LOCKING (COMPARTMENT DOORS)
TRAILER HITCH PACKAGE (20,000 LBS.)
LOW FUEL WARNING LIGHT
COURTESY LIGHTS BLINKER SWITCH
ENGINE AND COMPARTMENTS LIGHTING
KNOEDLER POWER CHIEF WITH HEATING, COOLING AND MASSAGING DRIVER SEAT
5 COLOR FACTORY EXTERIOR PAINT W/SPECIAL EFFECT AND SUPER CLEAR COAT
BACK-UP SOUND ALARM
HEADLAMPS CLEANING
XENON HEADLAMPS

GENERAL
LIGHTWEIGHT GRANITE COUNTERTOPS
AIR POCKET DOORS WITH ROD-LESS CYLINDERS
FLEXFOIL INSULATION ON INTERIOR OF SHELL
MARINE GRADE ELECTRICAL WIRE
LUTRON HOMEWORKS ILLUMINATION CONTROL SYSTEM WITH REMOTE DIAGNOSTICS OPTION

5 CRESTRON TOUCH SCREEN CONTROLLERS LINKED TO LUTRON HOMEWORKS OPERATING SYSTEM WITH I-PHONE / I-TOUCH AND LAPTOP CONTROLS
FULLTIME INTERNET WI-FI NETWORK CONNECTION
RUSSOUND CAV6.6 SIX-ZONE A/V PROCESSOR
(2) DVD/VCR RECORDERS WITH DIGITAL TUNERS
(2) SATELLITE DVR RECEIVERS
CEILING ACCENT ROPE LIGHTING THROUGHOUT USING LED TECHNOLOGY
MARINE GRADE SOLID BRASS ADJUSTABLE OVERHEAD LIGHTS
MULTI-ZONE AQUA HOT HEATING SYSTEM
INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR LED LIGHTING
MOTORIZED HUNTER DOUGLAS CELL SHADES
FRONT AND REAR CUSTOM SPOILERS

STATEROOM
MAIN VANITY
32” FLAT SCREEN LCD MONITOR
BOSE 321 GS SERIES SURROUND SOUND
AIPHONE INTERCOM WITH BUILT IN MONITOR TO VIEW ENTRY DOOR
MASTER LIGHTING SWITCH ON THE REAR NIGHTSTAND AND FRONT
ELECTRIC BLACK-OUT SHADES
PRE-WIRE FOR CEILING FAN
CARBON MONOXIDE DETECTOR
SMOKE DETECTOR
SPECIAL LIGHTWEIGHT SOUND INSULATION PACKAGE
FABRICA CARPETING WITH HIGH DENSITY PADDING
JR. KING ADJUSTABLE BED
LEFT AND RIGHT END TABLES AT HEAD OF THE BED
DRAWER BENEATH THE FOOT OF THE BED
MIRRORED CEILING
CUSTOM BEDDING
CARPET LINED WARDROBE CABINETS WITH CEDAR CEILINGS

LAVATORY
MID AND REAR LAVATORY WITH HEADHUNTER ELONGATED COMMODE WITH HOMETECH BIDET
OVERSIZED SHOWER IN REAR LAVATORY
120-VOLT VANITY LIGHTING
120-VOLT OUTLET IN BOTTOM AND INSIDE UPPER VANITY CABINET
FANTASTIC VENT WITH COVER IN COMMODE ROOM

AQUAHOT HEATER
PORCELAIN TILE FLOORS WITH GRANITE INLAYS
GRANITE COUNTERTOPS
SHAMPOO AND SOAP HOLDER
LOWER VANITY CABINET WITH FLUSH DOORS AND DRAWERS
MEDICINE CABINET

GALLEY
GE SIDE BY SIDE FULL SIZED REFRIGERATOR WITH 23.3 CUBIC FEET OF STORAGE
BREW EXPRESS COFFEE MAKER (RECESSED AND HARD PLUMBED)
TWO BURNER COOK TOP
STACKED BOSCH WASHER AND DRYER UNITS
MARINE-GRADE POWER PANEL
ADVANTIUM CONVECTION MICROWAVE
AQUAHOT HEATER
CENTRAL VACUUM
BAR DINETTE WITH ADJUSTABLE CUSTOM BUILT STOOLS WITH POP-UP COMPUTER/TV
SMOKE DETECTOR
AUTOMATIC INTERIOR LED CABINET LIGHTS
GALAXY GRANITE FLOORING WITH RED ONYX INCLUDING ELECTRIC FLOOR HEAT
FRANKE BEECH SINK SYSTEM WITH ACCESSORIES
SINGLE HANDLE FAUCET WITH BUILT-IN SPRAYER
FULL SIZED PANTRY
LIGHTWEIGHT CABINET CONSTRUCTION WITH WOOD VENEER AND POLYESTER FINISH
FISCHER PAYKEL DISH DRAWER

FRONT LOUNGE
LIFESTYLE V30 HOME THEATER SYSTEM
42’ LCD TELEVISION
ADAGIO MULTI MEDIA SERVER IN HD
EKRONE RECLINER
FIBERGLASS WINDOW SILLS
MOTORIZED HUNTER DOUGLAS CELL SHADES
SOFA (ELECTRIC FRAME) ON DRIVER’S SIDE WITH STORAGE BELOW

PILOT AND CO-PILOT SEATING AREA
110 VAC AND 12 VDC OUTLETS
KENWOOD/GARMIN AM/FM/DVD/GPS/MP3
MAPPING SYSTEM
15” ADJUSTABLE MONITOR AT PASSENGER SEAT
COLOR LCD BACKUP MONITOR WITH I-CONTROL FUNCTION
CB RADIO
MAP LIGHTS FOR CO-PILOT AND DRIVER
MASTER CONTROL SWITCHES
ELECTRIC PRIVACY SHADES
MAP STORAGE AND DRINK HOLDER
CARPETING BELOW THE DRIVER’S SEAT
KNOELDER AIR RIDE COOLED, HEATED AND MESSAGING DRIVER’S SEAT
BURL DASH PANELS
CUSTOM ENTRY DOOR DESIGN
SLIDE STEPWELL COVER
OPEN SHOE STORAGE IN STEPWELL
CUSTOM STEERING WHEEL WITH SMART FUNCTIONS
VILLA 28” WIDE CO-PILOT SEAT WITH THE FOLLOWING OPTIONS: RECLINE, FOOTREST, ELECTRIC SIX WAY POWER BASE, MASSAGE, HEATING, MAP STORAGE AND DRINK HOLDER

EXTERIOR GENERAL EQUIPMENT
UPPER AND LOWER LED BLUE ROPE LIGHTING
CB ANTENNA
CELLULAR PHONE ANTENNA
AM/FM ANTENNA
GPS ANTENNA
DIGITAL TV ANTENNA
INMOTION TRACSTAR SATELLITE
DISH WITH (2) RECEIVERS
COLOR DIRECTIONAL BACKUP CAMERA ON REAR OF COACH
AIPHONE DOORBELL / CAMERA NEXT TO ENTRANCE DOOR

4 FULL LENGTH ROOF MOUNTED AWNINGS WITH MOTION SENSORS (3-POSITION) SLIDEOUT / WINDOW / PATIO
(6) LED CURB LIGHTS
4 HIGH POWERED AIR HORNS IN NOSE FOR WIND NOISE REDUCTION
HWH ONE-TOUCH LEVELING SYSTEM
GENERATOR ROOF EXHAUST
CUSTOM PAINTED REAR WINDOW GRAPHICS
AQUAHOT ROOF EXHAUST
SIDE MARKER LIGHT TRIM
CHROME PLATED HEATED SIDE MIRRORS
LICENSE PLATE HOUSING-POLISHED S/S
MICROWAVE VENT
LED LIGHTS ON TOP AND BOTTOM OF COACH

BAY COMPARTMENTS
1ST BAY 101 CUBIC FEET OF STORAGE (CURBSIDE OR ROADSIDE)
2ND BAY 30 CUBIC FEET OF STORAGE (CURBSIDE)
3RD BAY 15 CUBIC FEET OF STORAGE (CURBSIDE)
(8) 8D MARINE DEEP CYCLE BATTERIES
(4) 3500 WATT OUTBACK INVERTERS
100 AMP VANNER BATTERY EQUALIZER
BATTERY TIE-IN RELAY (CONNECTING HOUSE BATTERIES TO CHASSIS BATTERIES AND CHASSIS BATTERIES TO HOUSE BATTERIES)
(4) BATTERY DISCONNECT SWITCHES
GLENDINNING ELECTRIC REEL FOR SHORELINE CORD (WITH WIRELESS REMOTE)SHORELINE CORD (60’)
ADAPTORS FOR SHORELINE FOR 30A AND 20A SERVICE
SHORELINE REVERSE POLARITY MONITOR
TELEPHONE AND CABLE TV CONNECTORS NEAR SHORELINE REEL
COAX CORD
AUXILIARY AIR COMPRESSOR WITH TWO SERVICE AIR CONNECTIONS (D/S AND C/S)
COSMETIC PANELS TO COVER ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT
120 VOLT GFCI RECEPTACLES IN THE PLUMBING COMPARTMENT
330 AMP AIR COOLED ALTERNATOR FOR HOUSE SYSTEM
1 40 AMP AIR COOLED ALTERNATOR FOR CHASSIS SYSTEM

HVAC
AQUAHOT HEATER WITH THERMOSTATS IN PLUMBING COMPARTMENT
(4) ROOFTOP A/C UNITS LOW PROFILE (15,000 BTU’S EACH) CRESTRON CONTROLLED
120 VAC CERAMIC HEATER IN FIRST, SECOND AND PLUMBING BAYS
ELECTRIC FLOOR HEAT

GENERATOR
POWERTECH ULTIMATE 17.5 KW TURBO GENERATOR
GENERATOR AUTO-START FEATURE (CONTROLLED BY LUTRON AND CRESTRON SYSTEMS)
GENERATOR BATTERY BOOST CIRCUITRY
GENERATOR PRIMARY FUEL FILTER
START/STOP SWITCHES AT THE FOLLOWING LOCATIONS:
* GENERATOR
* DRIVER’S AREA POWER PANEL
* INVERTER PANEL
* CRESTRON TOUCHSCREENS
* ANY REMOTE ACCESS COMPUTER
ROOF MOUNTED GENERATOR EXHAUST
ROOF MOUNTED COOLING SYSTEM FOR GENERATOR
INVERTER BYPASS SWITCHES

PLUMBING
AQUAHOT WATER HEATING SYSTEM WITH (2) 1500 WATT ELECTRIC HEATING ELEMENTS
HEADHUNTER 120 VOLT WATER PUMP
WATER PRESSURE REGULATOR
CARTRIDGE WATER FILTER SYSTEM
2 HOSE CARRIERS FOR DUMPING HOLDING TANK HOSES
PAPER TOWEL AND SOAP DISPENSER
PLASTIC PLUMBING WITH FLEXIBLE LINES FOR VIBRATION ISOLATION
MANIFOLD SYSTEM WITH SHUT OFF VALVES TO ALL PLUMBING EQUIPMENT. (NO SHUTOFFS INSIDE THE COACH INTERIOR; CONTINUOUS LINES RUN FROM THE MANIFOLD TO THE FIXTURE)
STAINLESS STEEL COVER
POLYPROPYLENE FRESH WATER TANK WITH CLEAN OUT (200 GALLONS)
POLYPROPYLENE GREY WATER TANK WITH CLEAN OUT (100 GALLONS)
POLYPROPYLENE BLACK WATER TANK WITH CLEAN OUT (100 GALLONS)
ELECTRIC OPERATED DUMP VALVES

TANK LEVEL MONITOR GAUGES AT ALL CRESTRON PANELS AND REMOTE SYSTEMS
CITY WATER INLET WITH MILLENNIUM AUTOMATIC FRESH WATER FILL SYSTEM
GRAVITY FILL FOR FRESH WATER TANK
MANUAL TANK CLEAN OUT VALVES FOR GREY AND BLACK TANK
HOSE BIB
STAINLESS STEEL COSMETIC PANELS TO COVER PLUMBING EQUIPMENT
BUILT IN PRESSURE WASHER WITH 75’ LINE ON REEL (1450 PSI)
BUILT IN DEIONIZER WITH BYPASS FOR SPOT FREE RINSE MODE
MACERATOR WITH ELECTRIC HOSE REEL
ABS PLASTIC UNDER THE PLUMBING EQUIPMENT

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
ENTERTAINMENT CABINET WITH STORAGE DRAWERS
REFRIGERATOR
BOSE 321 GS SERIES SURROUND SOUND
52” LCD FLAT SCREEN MONITOR ON PULLOUT ADJUSTABLE SLIDE SYSTEM
(4) ZIP DEE LAWN CHAIRS
KENYON CUSTOM SMOKELESS INFRA RED GRILL

KBOO – Digital Divide Radio Show
FM Radio
Image by caseorganic
@brampitoyo and @caseorganic h

@brampitoyo and @caseorganic hosted an episode of Digital Divide on KBOO — local community radio. Here is what the place looked like. kboo.fm/DigitalDivide Fun!

Radio | Posted by

Nice Flight To Washington photos

August 10th, 2016

Some cool Flight to Washington images:

GOES-13 Satellite Sees Line of Strong to Severe Thunderstorms Headed to Washington, DC
Flight to Washington
Image by NASA Goddard Photo and Video
This visible image from the GOES-13 satellite was captured on April 28 at 1332 UTC (9:32 a.m. EDT) as a huge line of strong and severe thunderstorms moved through central Maryland triggering two tornado warnings. The image shows the line moving through Maryland, Washington, D.C., and northern Virginia. Delaware and the eastern shore of Maryland is visible through cloud cover in the center of the image. The whitest clouds in the line are the highest, strongest thunderstorms.

These storms were part of a long line of strong to severe thunderstorms stretching from upstate New York to southern Virginia. This portion of the line was headed toward the Baltimore/Washington, D.C. corridor. This line had triggered two Doppler radar spotted tornadoes earlier in Frederick and Montgomery County, Md. (west of Baltimore and Washington, D.C.). The tornadoes are currently unconfirmed, but some damages have been reported. Gusty winds, small hail, heavy rain, frequent lightning and isolated tornadoes were possible with this line.

The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, GOES-13 is operated by NOAA, and NASA’s GOES Project at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. creates images and animations from the satellite data.

Rob Gutro, NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

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Image from page 12 of “The assassination of Abraham Lincoln : flight, pursuit, capture, and punishment of the conspirators” (1901)
Flight to Washington
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: assassinatio3358oldr
Title: The assassination of Abraham Lincoln : flight, pursuit, capture, and punishment of the conspirators
Year: 1901 (1900s)
Authors: Oldroyd, Osborn H. (Osborn Hamiline), 1842-1930 Harris, T. M. (Thomas Mealey), 1817-1906
Subjects: Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865 Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865 Booth, John Wilkes, 1838-1865 Presidents
Publisher: Washington, D.C. : O.H. Oldroyd
Contributing Library: Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection
Digitizing Sponsor: State of Indiana through the Indiana State Library

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Honor Flight SC September 3, 2014
Flight to Washington
Image by Perry B McLeod

Washington | Posted by Victoria Addington

Nice Flight To Washington photos

August 4th, 2016

Check out these Flight to Washington images:

Dolly Sod, WV (3)
Flight to Washington
Image by D.Clow – Maryland
Friday
Entry One

Flew out of work, the fleet flight of Friday before a holiday weekend. Everyone cracks a smile upon stepping out of the concrete and glass coffin of the corporate work week. The motorcycle is quickly gassed and loaded, I leave Washington DC at three-thirty, vowing not to check the time for the rest of the adventure. Adventure, the American adventure of the open road is what I seek. The road, my cameras, and escape.

Right turn off of 15th St. NW and I’m motoring past the Washington Monument and the White House. Harleys and clones are already lining the Mall for the annual Memorial remembrance that is Rolling Thunder. I’m soon over the bridge and on I-66 west. I plan on avoiding major highways when at all possible. Preferring scenic byways to drab highways. 66 is a necessary evil to flee the DC metro area as quickly as possible. At the start, 66 is a good quick run, for awhile anyway. Loads of Rolling Thunder riders are heading in 66 eastbound.

I keep the ubiquitous two fingers down to the side salute to fellow bikers out for extended stretches of time. In my experience, HD guys return the acknowledgement about 30-40% of the time. No big deal, some animosity exist though between different bike cultures. Motor-ism two-wheel stereotypes. However with the Rolling Thunder guys there is a noticeable increase in response, perhaps due to no longer just one biker acknowledging another, but a patriotic sharing of support and remembrance for those left behind, POW-MIA.

Traffic worsens further out 66 and I come up on a full HD dresser. Screaming Eagle back patch worked in with POW-MIA covers his vest and is topped by a “Run for the Wall” patch. I keep back a pace and we adopt the natural offset positioning of multiple riders.

After some 66 backup, stop-and-go, we strike up a staccato conversation in the pauses of the traffic flow. Where you been, where you going, see the rain coming? I tell him I’m headed out to the mountains, Skyline Drive and West Virginia. He says he’s just in from there recently, was in DC for Rolling Thunder for the day and will be coming back in on Sunday again. His license plate is obscured by luggage, so I’m unsure of his port of origin.

Later on we part ways and my thoughts turn. Of my parents friends only my step-dad was drafted for Vietnam. Luckily, for us, he only went as far as Ft. Hood, TX, and came back with some good stories about army life and venturing into Mexico (at least the ones he’s shared with me). I think about all the life he’s lived since then, all his experiences and joys. Thinking about what all those who didn’t return gave up, lost, when they didn’t come home. The loss felt by those who loved them, families that have a name on the Wall.

Rain is sprinkling before Manassas. Enough to cool you off but not enough to get you worried yet, at least for a bit. Whooooo. Then come the big drops. I head off the ramp to gear up with the rain paraphernalia under the gas station pavilion. Finally get it all on and get strapped back up and out pops the sun and the rain stops. Too funny. Now I have wet clothes on under the raingear. Rain gear now keeping the wind out that would dry me. I motor on as more rain is promised on the horizon.

This brings up a point about rain. People always ask, “What do you do when it rains and your on the motorcycle”. I reply simply, “I get wet”. Duh. Rain riding has never bothered me. On the straight highways it’s no big deal. Just give more cushion to the cars in front of you. Drive like grandma on the exit ramps.

My turning point is finally reached. Off of 66 west and onto 647, Crest Hill Rd. at The Plains, VA. Crest Hill Road is my first slice of motorcycle heaven to be had this weekend. I’m delighted to find that the squiggly line I traced out on the map when planning this trip has translated so well in reality. The road is still wet from the passing rain clouds, and I give a small rabbit and then a chipmunk a near death experience. My first of many animal crossings this weekend. The road is fantastic. A mixture of hilltop road and tree lined canopies that create forest tunnels. Speed limit is 45mph, 55-60 feels comfortable on most parts. Keeping an eye out for a hilltop barn to photograph that I’ve seen in my minds eye, lit by the sun breaking through the clouds and backed by the mountain vista. No luck on any of the barns actual placement to fit the mental picture I have framed.

Crest Hill Road and Fodderstack Rd is a long stretch. I take shots of a church and other buildings along Zachary Taylor Highway. Fodderstack gives more of the same as Crest Hill, just a narrower road. The asphalt is of my favorite variety, freshly laid. Washington, VA is a tiny town of historic bed and breakfasts. Local wineries appear to be an attraction here too. Right after Washington the rain returns while I’m in route to Sperryville. Then it really starts to come down, a full on summer thunderstorm. Visibility is down. Road and parking lots soon resemble rivers. Rain drops of the monster variety explode on the pavement, and you know it hurts when they hit you.

I quick soaking circuit of Sperryville confirms there are no local hotels. I duck into a barn shaped restaurant to wait it out. My drenched gear takes on bar stool and I occupy another. There’s a few flying pigs about. The bartender get me a hefeweizen, and recommends the angus burger. Locally raised and grass fed, we exchange jokes about my passing the burgers relatives on the way in.

Don’t freak about the beer. I have a one only rule when riding. It was followed by a meal (best burger of the weekend!), several coffees, and this bar top journal entry.

Somewhere along Crest Hill road I decided to keep the cell off for the weekend. In addition no tv, newspapers, internet, or e-mail sound like a good idea. Of course I now am studiously avoid eye contact with the two beautiful plasma’s above the bar.

Entry Two

Hazel River Inn, Culpepper, VA, has the coolest street side seating in town.

The downpour let up at the Shady Farms bar in Sperryville and due to the deficiency in local lodging I quiz the bartender for options. Over the other side of the mountain, the opposite side of Skyline Dr via 211 is Luray with lots of motels, but I want to save the mountain for the morning. The waitress suggest Culpepper, there being a Holiday Inn etc.

Stepping outside the sun has broke through the clouds again. Enough for some shots of Shady Farms Restaurant and a bridge. Heading down 522, the Sperryville Pike, I keep an eye out for photo ops to catch the next morning as I’ll be rerouting back through. Following the mantra of Dale Borgeson about tour riding in the US, I aim to avoid large chain establishments, whether they are restaurants or hotels, and explore the mom-and-pop local variety businesses. I have a dive-ish roadside motel in mind, Culpepper comes through with the Sleepy Hollow Hotel.

Before check in I ride through downtown historic Culpepper. It’s a cool place. The Shady Farm bartender had recommended the Culpepper Thai restaurant. I see it but don’t visit, still full from the meal earlier. Cameron Street Coffee looks like a great place, located in an old warehouse. Unfortunately their closed for the night.

Shower and changed, room 102 at the Sleepy Hollow Hotel. I hop back on the bike, refreshed and dry and ride through the warm night air back downtown. The coffee at the Hazel River Inn comes with a sweet fudge confection on the side. The peach and blackberry cobbler with vanilla sauce is divine.

The reconfigured plan for this getaway is to shed. Shed worries about the job, career, housing, and relationships. My motorcycle is therapeutic. It’s 600cc’s of Zoloft on two wheels. The road lifts my spirits. This wasn’t supposed to be a solo run, and there are stretches of road where I feel the emptiness behind me.

The cobbler is finished and I can hear the sound of a band doing their sound check. The banging of the drum requires investigation.

Entry Three

I found Brown Bag Special in the cellar pub of the same restaurant I was in. On my way to the door the noise of the sound check floated up the stairs and directed my feet downward. Brown Bag Special opened the set, appropriately enough, with “I drink alone”. The ol’ man, Big Money, would have loved it. Drink alone started off a Big Money Blues trifecta to include “The Breeze” and “Mustang Sally”. Then they made the mistake a lot of bands make that have a great lead guitar player. They let him sing. The lead guitarist karaoke sucked his way through a Tom Petty hit. He was so off key in his singing it made you appreciate the guitar solo’s all the more for the relief they provided. Thankfully the regular singer soon resumed his duties and the night went on. More good stuff from the band.

Freebird
Folsom Prison Blues
Cheap Sun Glasses

“can’t you see, can’t you see, what that woman, what she’s done to me”

Off to bed now at the Sleepy Hollow Hotel with the ghost and shades of dead hookers and overdoses past.

150 miles today.

Saturday

Entry Four

Morning breaks on the Sleepy Hollow Hotel, a hot shower and I’m back on the bike. A quick stop downtown to shoot the Hazel Inn, then it’s back on the Sperryville Pike. More stops to capture some sights seen yesterday. Mr. & Mrs. Pump. The open mouth caricatures are an accurate representation of the current gas cost and the pumps eating your wallet.

I keep telling my daughter that her first car, college car, will be a hybrid. She thinks they are ugly. The bike isn’t so bad, averaging around 40mpg. At about 180 miles on the tripometer I start to look for a refill, although I’ve pushed it to 211 miles before.

A quick left in Sperryville on 211 and up into the mountain, Blue Ridge Mountains and Skyline Drive. Heading up the mountain I get the first bite of the twisties I’ve been craving. The fee at the gate to Skyline Drive is well worth the price. Great scenery and fantastic views. The only drawback is the 35mph speed limit that is well enforced by the park rangers.

I shoot some self-portraits at Pollock Knob overlook. They’re funny in that with all the scrambling and hurrying to be the camera timer, then trying to effect a relaxed pose. I’ve also broke out my old friend this trip, the Lubitel 166, a medium format, 120mm film, twin lens camera. I’m like Jay-Z with this camera, I have to get it in one take. There is no digital review after the click for instant gratification. As a fellow photographer it’s “Point, Push, and Pray”. I’ll be interested to see the results. Not that I’ve left digital behind. Carrying both cameras, I’m an analog/digital double threat.

After the self-portraits and some dead tree shots I’m about to pack back on the bike and leave when I meet the preacher and his wife. He offers to shoot me with my camera and I return the favor with theirs. Conversation flows and in a ‘small world’ moment it turns out that he works for same Hazel family that owns the restaurant I was at last night for his Monday thru Friday job. I get a friendly “God bless” and I’m heading south on Skyline Drive. I make several more stops and break out the cameras again at Big Meadow.

There is a gnarly dead tree in the middle of the meadow. It has burn damage at the base, either the result of some wild fire or perhaps a controlled burn done to maintain the field. I spot and shoot a few deer, they probably won’t turn out as they’re to far away for my lens on the D100. I shoot a bunch of shots of the tree with the D100 and then totally switch processes with the Lubitel. The picture setup with the Lubitel takes about a minute-and-a-half. Manual zoom, i.e., walking back and forth to get the framing I want. Light meter reading. Then dealing with the reversed optics of the look-down box camera. It is fun though, to switch it up, change the pace and the dynamics. Just one click though, hope I caught it.

It’s a long but enjoyable ride to the south end of Skyline Drive. Unless you really like slow cruising I would suggest picking which third of Skyline Drive you’d like include in your trip and leave the rest. I drop off the mountain and into Waynesboro. Finding Mad Anthony’s coffee shop for a late breakfast. I overhear that it’s around noon. The Italian Roast coffee is good, in fact, it would prove to be the best coffee of the trip.

One of the pleasures of traveling by motorcycle is that it’s an easy conversation starter. People ask you where your coming from, where you’re heading, ask about your bike, tell you’re about their bike or the one they wish they had. One of the peculiarities of these conversations is that if the person even remotely knows of anyone that has died on a motorcycle, they will be sure to share this fact along with details. These stories usually involve a deer, a car pulling out, or someone taking a corner to fast. The conversation goes something like this:

Stranger“nice bike”
You“thanks”
Stranger“my cousin Bob had a friend that hit a deer and died on his bike”

Short silence.

You“yeah, deer are dangerous, got to be careful”

I’m not exaggerating when I say I’ve held variations on this conversation many times. Luckily this isn’t the conversation I have with the owner of Mad Anthony’s. He’s a former sailboat instructor who now finds the same release and head clearing on his motorcycle that he used to get from his sailboat.

This brings to mind the same wave – don’t way dynamic that occurs between sail boaters and power boaters, very similar to the sportbike & HD crowd.

The proprietor is a coffee guru, we discuss roasting (my Italian roast was just roasted Wednesday this week). We talk about the good and the evil of Starbucks. We’re both in agreement that they over roast their regular coffee, but I think their foo foo drinks are tasty. He has in his shop both the Bodum press and the Bodum vacuum coffee pot that I got my mom for x-mas. A shameless plug here, the Bodum vacuum coffee pot makes the best home coffee ever. It’s also an entertaining crowd pleaser, no joke.

Leaving Waynesboro the plan was 340 northward to 33, then into Harrisonburg, VA (home of the Valley Mall and JMU). 340 proved to be boring so I jumped on 256, Port Republic Road, for a better ride to Harrisonburg. I don’t know if the coffee wore off or if I was just worn out. I pull over at Westover Park, pick out a spot of grass, and take a good nap in the sun.

I had my motorcycle bug handed down to me by my step-dad. My kindergarten year of school we moved right at the end of the school year. Rather than switch schools at this inopportune time my Dad stuck me on the back of his Honda and rode me to school and back again for the last month or two. Even earlier than that I have a great photo of me in 1973-4 sitting on his chopper with him. Me in a diaper and him with his long hippy hair. The wild side of the Reverend indeed.

Refreshed from my nap it’s back on 33 westbound. Heading out of the Shenandoah Valley and Rockingham County is more glorious twisty roads and the George Washington National Forest. GW is a beautiful tree canopy lined road with a river off to one side. Franklin, WV is the destination, a return to the Star Hotel.

I stayed at the Star a few years prior when they first re-opened the historic Star Hotel. The owner, Steve Miller, is a great guy, friendly and conversational. I told him I’d be back again, but it’s been a few more years than I thought. Late lunch at the Star is pesto grilled chicken on ciabatta bread with roasted red peppers. Not the type of fare one might associate with West Virginia, but people have misperceptions about everywhere. Steve promises a prime rib later at dinner tonight to die for.

So that there is no misunderstanding, in as much as the Sleepy Hollow Hotel was a dive, the Star Hotel is a dream.

Dump the gear in the room back on the bike for some roaming around. I head back to explore a river road I passed on the way in, Rock Gap. It’s a gravel affair and I follow it back a little ways. Photo some river shots. Down further there is a large cliff face with some college aged kids de-gearing after a day of climbing. I’ll try to stop back in tomorrow and shoot some climbing action, as well as some fly fishing.

I pick up a bottle of Barefoot Wine, Cabernet Sauvignon, and drop it off with Steve at the Star to keep for later. I’ll enjoy that bottle later tonight from the 3rd floor front porch. South out of town I head, into some very secondary roads. I shoot an old decrepit cabin that would be right up Bobby Sargent’s alley. I put it in the metal folder for a possible future model shoot location, along with the river spots I’ve seen.

There are a couple more stops on this little ride. Once for what appears to be a feral chicken, and then for middle of the road stare down with a young doe. She’s camera shy though and is off before I can get a shot. Sportbike probably isn’t the best conveyance for nature photography. The pavement stops and gravel begins, I motor on. Rick & I once spent a full day just about on gravel roads, crisscrossing the back country around Cumberland, MD. So I’m comfortable with the less than ideal riding surface. A few miles on the road dead ends at a pair of chicken houses (source of the feral chicken’s ancestors perhaps?) and I turn around and survey the valley I’ve just ridden through. I have to stop the bike and soak in the scene. A picturesque farm is nestled in the corner of the valley, up against the hills. I meet some inquisitive cows, along with the farmer and his wife.

It seems that when you are in WV and you pass a sign that says “snow removal ends here” that the already suspect road conditions are going to quickly deteriorate and will soon resemble somewhat more of a logging road. I motor on through some back country, no houses, no farms, just mountains, steep roadside cliffs, and wicked gravel switchback curves. The part that gives you the willies are the downhill corners where the road grade is slanted to the outside of the curve and to the drop below. Yikes!

I creep along where a four wheeler would be much more functional. Although I still hit it a bit in the straights. Pavement arrives again and I’m unsure of my exact location. I follow the chicken farmers directions and soon discover myself back in Brandywine, intersecting the same stretch of 33 I rode on my way into Franklin.

Back at the Star Hotel it’s a shower and fresh clothes before heading down for dinner. Downstairs I find the prime rib to be as good as promised.

Entry Five

How beautifully staged is this. Barefoot on the 3rd floor patio, wine to ease the back and the ache in the knee.

205 miles today, the last 30 after check in, just to explore.

Sunday

Entry Six

Out early in the morning. I find no climbers at Rock Gap, unsure of the hours they keep. Out of Franklin on 33 west, looking for another squiggly line I had seen on a map. Bland Hill Road name is a misnomer. A single lane country road winding through German Valley. I got a few shots of German Valley from the 33 overlook before turning on Bland Hill. Now I find myself in the same location I had shot from above.

The road cuts through some open pasture land and I meet some cows standing in the road after rounding one bend. They’re pleasant enough, if in no particular hurry to cross, and don’t mind posing for a shot or two before meandering on. People talk about the danger of hitting a deer, a cow would really ruin your day! Off of Bland Hill and on down into the valley. I come up on the rock formation I had seen from the overlook previously. It’s not Seneca Rocks, but a formation of the same ilk. I get some more photos, then onto German Valley Road. I’m still staying at the Star, there is no real destination today. It’s relaxing to stop as much as I like.

German Valley Road puts me back on 33 west and not long after I’m ordering breakfast at the Valley View Restaurant. Dale Borgeson warns of places that advertise home cooking, but that’s about all you see in these parts. There are a fair number of cars here and that’s usually a good since the food will be alright. Hell, even the Army could make a good breakfast. It all works out and it’s a hell of a deal, for toast, two eggs, hash browns, bacon, and coffee.

From 33 I hit 28 and turn off on Smoke Hole Road, just because it’s there and looks interesting. Boy, what a find it is. Combining the curvy one lane country road with nice wide smooth pavement (gravel free in the corners). It’s great. Smoke Hole Road turns out to run from 28 across the Seneca Rocks National Forest to 220 on the other side. Going west-to-east it starts out all curves and hills, then ends by winding along the south branch of the Potomac. There are lots of fly fishermen here enjoying the catch-and-release section of the river.

Up 220 to Petersburg, I run into some Ducati guys at the gas station. We swap riding info and I’m soon on 42 north towards Mayville. Hanging a left when I see a sign for Dolly Sods. I’m back on secondary roads and I soon pass another prophetic ‘no snow removal’ signs. It’s gravel the rest of the way up the mountain til it breaks out on top at Dolly Sod.

I’m real happy with today’s roads, as both Smoke Hole Road and Dolly Sods were unplanned ‘discovered adventures’. I do some rock scrabbling at Dolly Sod and enjoy the cliff top views. A fellow tourist snaps a shot for me an I hike out well past the distance that the casual tourist and families go. Shot some more shots of the rock formations with both the digital and film camera. Do some more self-portraits. I then sit down to relax in the sun with the cliff side breeze steadily blowing and update this journal.

Entry Seven

Well, fellow traveler, if you’ve made it this far I am duly impressed. I thank you for your perseverance. The rest of the day was spent riding without incident. Just more fantastic roads. You don’t have to be an explore on par with Lewis & Clark to find great rides in West Virginia. Just be curious in nature and unafraid to leave the beaten path. Drop off the numbered roads and take the route less traveled. Soon you’ll be in your own undiscovered country. Blah blah blah.

Out of Dolly Sod and I find myself on 32. Rough calculations put the dirt road travel around 25 miles for the day. While we are on stats, here’s today’s animal road count:

1 rooster
1 dead fox
2 cows
8 chipmunks
7 alive
1 dead
3 dead possums
1 squirrel
1 dead blob (undistinguishable)
No fearsome deer
1 dog

I guided myself today by a rather non-descript map put out by mountainhighlands.com

Leaving Dolly Sod on 32 puts me in Dry Fork and back on familiar 33 west to Elkins. I cruise around Elkins on the off chance I’ll run into a guy I know named Dallas. Now all you need to know about Dallas is the following:

I don’t know his last name
I once gave him a hair cut with dog grooming clippers
I know he works at a bike shop making choppers

You figure the odds of me finding him, near zero.

If your curious it wasn’t the first time I cut hair, albeit the first time using dog shears. In Korea I cut in the latrine for a cut or for a 6 pack. Everything was barter in the Army. We had a cook that would make you a great custom birthday cake for a case of beer or feed you food out of the back of the chow hall at 3am when you staggered in drunk from the ville for the promise of a future round to be bought. Korea stories could fill another journal.

Anyway, out of Elkins and south to Beverly. Scott, if your reading this you were on my mind as I went through town, never forgive, never forget.

So far I’ve only tried to write about the positive food experiences of the trip without throwing anyplace under the bus. C&J in Beverly however, served only barely functional burgers and the vanilla shake was of the worst chemical prefab variety. There are some things that I am stuck on, good vanilla ice cream is one. The others that I’m picky about are beer, whiskey, steak, cheese-steak, and coffee. It’s just so disappointing when something you usually enjoy turns out to be sub par.

After C&J it’s 250 east to 28, which heads back towards Seneca Rocks and Franklin. It’s a good haul through the Monongahela National Forest. A road of the scenic variety, with good twisties up the mountain and through the scenery. These type road have become quite a common occurrence here in WV. Back in Seneca Rocks and 33 east into Franklin. I never shoot Seneca Rocks, the light is never right, number one can tell you how I get about my light.

The Star’s restaurant is closed on Sunday, dagger, so I shower and head into Franklin by foot. About Franklin, WV. It’s a nice little town, quiet and sleepy. No bars other than the VFW that I could see. Everybody I’ve met and spoken too has be pleasant, friendly and conversational, both here in Franklin and elsewhere in WV. I’m sure there are a variety of characters much as anywhere, this is just my observation from the tourist level.

Following last night precedent I grab another vino from the Shell station. The Star being closed is a dilemma; I’m in need of a cork screw (having borrowed the restaurants the night before). I wander back down to the hotel, wine in hand, and past the hotel just a bit til I meet an old man sitting out front. I explain my situation, wine without access, and he says he’ll sell me a corkscrew. He goes in the house, shortly to return with the necessary implement in hand. I figure I have it for -4 or maybe rent it for a one time use for . That proves unnecessary however, he says just to take it, and keep it for any future need.

The sole booking for the hotel tonight, I’m like a wraith as I glide through the halls. On the front porch with my bottle of vino in hand. I have some cheap cigars I also picked up and there’s nothing to do but kick back and watch the sunset.

It’s been a great trip. Somewhat lonesome at times. The lack of someone to talk to surely let to the length of this journal. It was a trip to getaway, to reflect. There was no great revelation or anything, just time to get to know yourself. The road gives you time to think. I know who I am and I like being me. I know what’s missing.

I’m resolved to take more bike trips in the future. It’s definitely my preferred way to travel and vacation. Motorcycling is the way to go.

Tomorrow I have my route generally planned out, more scenic byways for a winding route home.

Miles today, 240.

Monday

Entry Seven

Just a short postscript. 20 miles east of Washington DC, on 66, the chain popped off the bike. It’s never easy.

Super Hornets Train on the USS George Washington
Flight to Washington
Image by #PACOM
PACIFIC OCEAN (Sept. 21, 2014) – Air Department Sailors prepare an F/A-18E Super Hornet from the Royal Maces of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 27 for launch from the flight deck of the forward deployed aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73). Aircraft from the Air Force 36th Operations Group and elements of the Army 94th Air and Missile Defense Command supported by surface ships and aircraft from Commander, Task Force 70 and aircraft from Marine Group 12 conducted the integrated joint island defense exercise as part of Valiant Shield 2014. Valiant Shield is a U.S.-only exercise integrating an estimated 18,000 Navy, Air Force, Army and Marine Corps personnel, more than 200 aircraft and 19 surface ships, offering real-world joint operational experience to develop capabilities that provide a full range of options to defend U.S. interests and those of its allies and partners. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Loni Mae Lopez) 140921-N-ZK360-054

** Interested in following U.S. Pacific Command? Engage and connect with us at www.facebook.com/pacific.command and twitter.com/PacificCommand and www.pacom.mil/

Washington | Posted by Victoria Addington

Nice 98.3 photos

August 2nd, 2016

Some cool 98.3 images:

Image from page 681 of “The Rotunda” (1920)
98.3
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Identifier: LONGWOOD_COLLEGE_ROTUNDA_1926-10_to_1933-05
Title: The Rotunda
Year: 1920 (1920s)
Authors: Longwood College Longwood University
Subjects:
Publisher: [Farmville, Va.]
Contributing Library: Longwood University
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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den-Syd-ney freshman, Poole, fills the billto a tee. Bidgie Warren as Aunt Julia, form-ally known as Lady Marden is surelysomething to write home about. Thepart itself is complete with manycatchy lines and Bidgie is all there inputting them over. That is about all I have to tell youabout it, except that it will be onNovember 21 and that it really iswell worth seeing! If you want to en-joy one of the biggest laughs of theseason, come! Come and bring alaugh loving friend with you! COTILLION CLUB DANCES AREALMOST HERE DAVIDSONS Evening Gowns and Evening Shoes are outstanding!We v^ill gladly dye shoes purchased from us FREE of charge DAVIDSONS, Inc. The House of (Quality FARMVILLE, VIRGINIA <s» Three piece suits the kind that sells for Qff PvQ.95. All colors and sizes __ tPO.Ot/ New^est fall shoes, low, medium and high heels. Prices .98 .95 ? ?J ^ I y 26 sample sport coats, Princess styleSpecial — – – THE HUB DEPARTMENT STORE :sm»c::3 J THE ROTUNDA, WEDNESDAY, 12, 1930

Text Appearing After Image:
Miss P.: Sarah Willis, why did notthe north immediately attack FortSumter? Sarah: Unprepared. Miss P.: Correct. Vsiitor: Mrs. Martin is yourdaughter home for the week-end? Mrs. Martin: Ill see if the car isin the garage. Julia Warwick: The night has athousand eyes. Budsey: The council girls havemore. Him: Id marry you. but youretoo dumb. Her: Youre right. You need awife with brain enough for two. Frances Ratclifl: Je vous adore.(I adore you.)Virginia Lowe: I shut it. Little Johnny: Daddy, how dowars start? Father: Suppose France and Eng-land had a quarrell. Mother: No, no! England andFrance mu.st not quarrel. Father: Im just supposing they should. Mother You are instilling ba( ideas. Father: England and France— Mother: No- Johnny: Never mind, I know. S. T. C: Will I ever be able to doanything with my voice?Mr. Strick: Yes, in case of fire. The only man who can let thingsslide is the trombone player. First Farmer: Why didnt you tellme this horse kicks? Second Farmer: The man Ibought

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 148 of “The Friend : a religious and literary journal” (1919)
98.3
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Identifier: friendreligiousl93smit
Title: The Friend : a religious and literary journal
Year: 1919 (1910s)
Authors: Smith, Robert, 1752-1838
Subjects: Society of Friends Quakers
Publisher: Philadelphia, Pa. : J. Richardson
Contributing Library: Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

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ttonTELEPHONESBell—Sprues 17-81 – – Keystone—Race 637 R. C. BALLINGER & CO CONTRACTORS and BUILDERS 218 N. Thirteenth St. Philadelphia. Woolman School A Friends School for Social andReligious Education. FALL TERM—Opens Tenth Month 7, 1919.Special Courses in Social Work andHistory of Missions.Regular Courses in Bible Study, History ofFriends and Religious Pedagogy.Write for Catalog.ELBERT RUSSELL, DirectorWOOLMAN SCHOOL, SWARTHMORE, PA. see WALKER & KEPLER Good Electrical Work 531 Chesnut St. Phila. POCONO LAKE, PA. FOR SALE One-half of Lot No. 93, Lake Front – Price, 0ALFRED C. HAINES. 56 N. Front St.. Philadelphia H„ F. Bruner S. D. Hall H. F. Bruner & Co, COAL OFFICE AND YARD 16 N. Twenty-first Street Philadelphia telephones: { Jgg«»» M. GATCHEL 126 N. 21st St., PHILA. MILLINERY, plamandfakct °9fe09*lffuef>8l!e ADVERTISING COPT and Direct-by-Mail printing that sell the goods.zAsk us to show you how! The Holmes Press 1336 Cherry Street, Philadelphia, Pa.

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Strong Securities forCareful Investors Among our September offerings of 90 primesecurities are : Approx. Price Yield B. & 0. R. R. Prior Lien 3 Y2%. .85^ 6.60Central of Ga. R. R. 10-Year Secured 6s 96% 6.45 Cuba R. R. 1st 5$ 85% 6.00 Susquehanna Silk Mills Serial 6s. 98 3. g 6.50Ask for Circular PF-247 The National CityCompany Correspondent Office* in SI Cities Philadelphia—1421 Chestnut St. Atlantic City—Chalfont Block1225 Boardwalk HARRY S. LEE 313 WALNUT STREET PAINTER AND GRAINER ANTIQUE and OFFICE FURNITURE RESTOREDJOBBING PROMPTLY ATTENDED TOESTIMATES. Residence: 254 S. 44th St. Bell Phone: Baring 2084X WILLIAM OAKESPlumbing and Heating Contractor Also Lead Burning260 South Tenth Street PHILADELPHIA Bell Phone—Filbert 2666. Glaslyn-Chatham PARK PLACEATLANTIC CITY, N0 J, A Family House of Established Reputation,oen Throughout the Year* na than L. jmm, Premier Duplicating Co. Mimeographing, Multigraphing, Printing, Type-writing, Addressing, Mailing, etc. m Ghwtnat Steeef

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Image from page 401 of “Hart’s annual army list, militia list and yeomanry cavalry list” (1902)
98.3
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Identifier: hartsannualarmy1902lond
Title: Hart’s annual army list, militia list and yeomanry cavalry list
Year: 1902 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: Great Britain. Army
Publisher: London : John Murray
Contributing Library: National Library of Scotland
Digitizing Sponsor: National Library of Scotland

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with East \ Africa Rifles j William James Robinson Lieutenants. Clement Arthur Wilkinson Clinton Wynyard Battye, DSO 2 Henry Grenville Bryant, DSO. 1Brigade Signalling Officer, S. Africa J Charles Ernest Atchison I 20 Feb. Arthur Thomson Curgenven Rundle, 1 -tjia~ Chinese Regimer.t j j 2? May 2 Ernest Robert Maling English , 28 Sept. 1 Alexander Henry Lloyd MRae 6 Apr. 2 Edward Arthur Underwood 4 May 2 Henry Wildman Kettlewell 28 May 1 Kenneth Lyle Philpin Lely [ 18 Jan. 1 Christopher Hugh Cautley (Depot) ; 18 Jan. 2 Peter Francis Fitzgerald j it Feb. 2 Edw. Pendarves Dorrien-Smith, DSO., 20 May 1 Richard Carthew Middleton 20 May 2 Robert Patric Miles 12 Aug. 2 John Mark Carter j 12 Aug. 2 Philip Lewis Hanbury | :8 Oct. 2 John Charles Hooper ; 18 Oct. Percy Robert Clifford Groves, \ . rwRailway Staff Officer, S. Africa … J I0 UCT- 2 George Arthur Delme-Murray 15 Nov. 1 Bertie Elibank Murray 18 Apr. 19 July go 1 July 81 11 Feb. 75 1 July 81 1 July 81 28 Oct. 71 26 Feb. 8: 9 Sept. 82

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21 June 85 13 Sept. 86 11 May 8431 Dec. 87 6 Dec. 89 ? July 791 Sept. 86 1 Jan. 9011 Feb. 90 BBEV.MAJ. 16 Apr. 903 May3 May 3 May2 May 25 July yi 5 Dec. 91 9 Apr. 92 18 June 92 15 Mar.26 Apr. 23 Dec. 7 Mar. 2 June 93 95 98 11 Feb. 94 5 June 94. 25 Oct. 9422 Dec. 94I 21 Aug. 95 6 Apr. 9811 May 98 8 June 98 8 June 98 3 July 98 7 Sept. 98 15 Mar. 99 24 June 99 19 July 99 4 Dec. 993 Apr. 00 9 May 00 26 May 006 June oo: 10 July 00 19 July 00: 6 Jan. 01 17 Jan. oil 22 Jan. 0130 Jan. 01 9 Mar. or 9 Mar. 01 IS Apr. or 4 Dec. 994 Dec. 996 June ~ 11 Aug. 00 6 Jan. 01 22 Jar. 01 9 Mar. 01 9 June 01 11 June 01 11 June 01 19 Aug. 94 23 Mar. 98 30 Nov. 9711 May 98 16 Nov. 98 20 M*y 8511 Feb. 98 11 Aug. 00 8 Mar. 01 12 Mar. 9019 Aug. 01 29 Nov. 0029 Nov. 00 29 Nov. 00 ! Foil HallPay, i Pay. TJie Kings (Shropshire Light Infantry). 318 LIEUTENANTS. 2 Robert Lambton Surtees 1 William Gochvine Robinson 2 Frank Evelyn Nevill Wrench 1 Lancelot Archer Jackson Second Lieutenants. 2 James Humphrey Allen Payn

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Washington | Posted by

Nice FM Radio photos

July 27th, 2016

Some cool FM Radio images:

PEAQ_DAB+ Digitalradio_PDR300
FM Radio
Image by Media-Saturn-Holding GmbH
DAB+-Empfang & FM-Radio
Internet-Radio
Apple-Dock für iPhone, iPod
WiFi integriert
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Piano Black Design

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Nice Flight To Washington photos

July 24th, 2016

Check out these Flight to Washington images:

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier – guard at attention 02 – Arlington National Cemetery – 2012
Flight to Washington
Image by Tim Evanson
Looking southeast at an honor guard soldier in front of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in front of Memorial Amphitheater at Arlington National Cemetery near Washington, D.C., in the United States. The memorial actually has no official name, but Arlington caretakers continue to refer to it by the clunky "Tomb of the Unknowns." Nearly everyone else uses the other name.

In front of the tomb are the marble vault covers for the Unknowns of other wars. They are, left to right: Korean War, Vietnam War (now empty), and World War II.

Arlington’s first Amphitheater was constructed of wood in 1874, and soon proved far too small. Congress authorized construction of the Memorial Amphitheater on March 4, 1913. Ground-breaking occurred on March 1, 1915, and President Woodrow Wilson placed the cornerstone on October 15, 1915. It was dedicated on May 15, 1920.

Originally, the main entrance to Memorial Amphitheater had a rectangular granite plaza in front of it, from which some short marble steps led down to a slightly elliptical granite plaza surrounded by a marble balustrade. From this overlook, you could see a rectangular grass lawn 20 feet below. But this soon changed…

Memorial Amphitheater was altered forever the year after its dedication. In 1917, America entered World War I. More than 1.3 million Americans served in Europe during the war, and more than 116,516 died. Just 4,221 were unidentified or missing; the missing (3,173) were the vast majority of them. Nonetheless, 1,100 "unidentified" American war dead was a burden on the national conscience, and the media focused heavily on grieving mothers with no body to bury. Some American generals suggested in 1919 that a "Tomb of an Unknown Soldier" be created in the United States. The idea didn’t gain traction at first, but in 1920 both England and France held huge public ceremonies honoring their unknown dead. These received much press attention in the United States, and on February 4, 1921, Congress enacted legislation establishing a similar memorial. Some proponents of the memorial originally proposed burying the unknown soldier in the crypt beneath the Capitol Rotunda — a crypt originally planned for George Washington (but politely declined by his family). Worried that the Capitol might become a mausoleum, Congress instead chose Arlington National Cemetery as the site for the new memorial. On March 4, 1921, with just hours left in his presidency, President Woodrow Wilson signed the legislation into law.

In the United States, preparation for the "Tomb of the Unknown Solider" was frantically under way. The newly-formed American Legion (a congressionally-chartered veterans’ lobby group) was pressing as late as May 1921 for the body to be buried in the Capitol Crypt. This debate was not resolved until mid-July, and by then very little time remained to create the monument. Where to build the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery continued until October, when it was decided that the view from the Memorial Amphitheater’s plaza was the most appropriate site.

The Tomb was cut unto the center of the short steps which led down to the granite overlook. Diggers buried downward until they reached the level of the lawn below. They then continued another 20 feet below the surface. The subsurface shaft was 16 feet from east to west and 9.5 feet from north to south, and filled with solid concrete. This formed the footings for the vault above. The footings had to be that deep and that large because tons of marble were going to be placed on top of them, and the memorial could not be permitted to sink or become destabilized. The vault itself was lined with marble. The vault’s walls ranged in thickness from 7 feet at the bottom to 2 feet, 4 inches at the top. A plinth (or "sub-base") was set on top of the vault walls. The plinth serves as the base of the memorial proper, and also helps to conceal the rough, unfinished top of the vault walls. The plinth was made of three finished, rectangular pieces of marble which fitted over the vault walls like a collar. These are on the north, south, and west sides of the vault, and were the only part of the substructure visible in 1921. (They remain visible today; you can just see them in this image.) Four rectangular marble pieces form the actual base of the memorial. These were mortared to the top of the plinth. A rectangular marble capstone with curved sides was placed on top of the base. The capstone was pierced with the a hole to permit the coffin to be lowered into through the base, through the plinth, and to the bottom of the grave vault. The bottom of the vault was lined with 2 inches of French soil, taken from various battlefields in France.

The World War I unknown was interred as scheduled on November 11, 1921. More than 100,000 people attended the ceremonies, including the Premier of France, Aristide Briand; the former Premier of France, Rene Viviani (who led France through the war); Marshal Ferdinand Foch (who was Commander in Chief of Allied Forces in France); President Warren G. Harding, former President William Howard Taft, and former President Woodrow Wilson. One thousand "gold star mothers" (women who had lost a son in the war) attended the ceremony, as did every single living Medal of Honor winner. The entire United States Cabinet was there, and so was the entire United States Supreme Court. Every member of the House and Senate was present (although they had to stand in the colonnade). A large number of military personnel also attended the dedication. These included General John Pershing, who had led American forces in Europe; Lieutenant General Nelson Miles, former Commanding General of the Army; Admiral of the Fleet David Richard Beatty of the United Kingdom; General Armando Diaz, Marshal of Italy; General Baron Alphonse Jacques de Dixmude of Belgium; Frederick Lambart, 10th Earl of Cavan, commander of British forces in Italy; Arthur Balfour, former Prime Minster of the United Kingdom; and Tokugawa, Prince of Japan. Also conspicuous was Chief Plenty Coups of the Crow Nation, in full battle regalia and headdress.

President Harding bestowed on the unknown soldier the Medal of Honor and the Distinguished Service Cross (the latter was never awarded again). General Jacques presented the Croix de Guerre, Belgium’s highest military honor. (He took from his own chest the medal, which had been bestowed on him by King Albert.) Admiral Beatty bestowed the Victoria Cross, which had never before been given to a foreigner. Marshal Foch bestowed the Medaille Militaire and the Croix de Guerre with palm, France’s highest military honor. General Diaz gave the Gold Medal for Bravery, Prince Bibescu of Romania gave the Virtuta Militaire, Dr. Dedrich Stephenek of Czechoslovakia presented the Szechoslovakia War Cross, and Prince Lubomirski of Poland gave the Virtuti Militan. When the coffin was ready for lowering into the vault, Chief Plenty Coups removed his war bonnet and tenderly placed it and his coup-stick on the coffin. He raised his hands to the sky. "I place on this grave of this noble warrior this coup stick and this war bonnet," he said, "every eagle feather of which represents a deed of valor by my race. I hope that the Great Spirit will grant that these noble warriors have not given up their lives in vain and that there will be peace to all men hereafter." An artillery battery fired, and the coffin began to be lowered. An answering a battery of fire came from the ”USS Olympia”, an American destroyer lying at anchor in the Potomac River. "Taps" were played. Once the coffin lay on the floor of the vault, the centerpiece of the capstone was put in place and the tomb sealed.

But all that existed was the base. The actual cenotaph, which you see here, did not yet exist.

Congress authorized completion of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in July 1926. The Secretary of War held a design competition, with judges from Arlington National Cemetery, the American Battle Monuments Commission, and the Commission of Fine Arts. Only architects of national standing were permitted to enter the competition, and 74 submitted designs. Five were chosen as finalists, and required to submit plaster models of their proposals. Architect Lorimer Rich and sculptor Thomas Hudson Jones won the competition. Their design imitated a sarcophagus, but really was a solid block of marble. The design included a thin rectangular base to go on top of the existing capstone. Then there was the "die block" (the main monument), on top of which was a capstone. The die block featured Doric pilasters (fake columns) in low relief at the corners. On the east side (facing the Potomac River) was a sculpture in low relief of three figures, representing female Victory, Valor (male, to her left), and Peace (female). The north and south sides were divided into three sections by fluted Doric pilasters, with an inverted wreath on the upper portion of each section. On the west side (facing the amphitheater) was the inscription: "Here Rests In Honored Glory An American Soldier Known But To God." It is still not clear who came up with the phrase, but it had been used on crosses marking the graves of unknown soldiers in Europe as early as 1925. The judges asked that the approaches to the Tomb be improved as well. Clarence Renshaw designed the steps. The balustrade was removed, and the short series of steps extended outward and downward until they reached the lawn. A small landing exists two-thirds of the way down, after which the steps continue (wider than before). Congress approved funding for the memorial and new steps on February 29, 1929, and a contract to complete the Tomb was awarded on December 21, 1929. Quartermaster General Brig. Gen. Louis H. Bash oversaw the construction, which was done by Hegman and Harris.

The Vermont Marble Company provided the marble. This proved very problematic. The Yule Marble Quarry at Marble, Colorado, was chosen as the quarry. A year passed before suitable pieces of marble could be located at the quarry and mined. Three pieces had to be mined before a piece suitable for the 56-ton die block was found. Three pieces were mined and discarded before a fourth piece was found for the 18-ton base. But once the base arrived at Arlington, workers discovered an imperfection in the marble which caused it to be discarded. A fifth, sixth, and seventh piece of marble was then mined, but only the eighth piece was suitable and brought to the cemetery. Amazingly, a piece for the 14-ton capstone was found on the first try.

Work began on the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in September 1931, but stopped for three months after a flaw in the base was found. Work resumed in December, and all three pieces were in place on December 31, 1931. Fabrication was completed on-site, with sculptor Jones working five days a week. The Tomb was completed and opened to the public on April 9, 1932. There was no dedication ceremony, and the memorial has never been officially named.

Unfortunately, the Tomb began to fall apart almost immediately. Chips and spalls (pieces broken off after heating and contracting) were found coming off the base in 1933. By 1963, a huge horizontal and secondary vertical crack had appeared in the die block — probably caused by the release of pressure after the marble was mined. Acid rain and pollution have caused the marble sculptures to wear down appreciably, such that today they are only about half as sharp as they once were. Although there is no likelihood that the monument will collapse, debate continues to rage as to whether the monument should be replaced.

Beginning on July 2, 1937, the U.S. Army began permanently stationing an honor guard at the Tomb. The 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment ("The Old Guard") formally took over these duties on April 6, 1948. It is guarded 24 hours a day, seven days a week, all year long. The guard is changed once every hour, on the hour. Out of respect for the dead, the guard carries his rifle on the outside shoulder — away from the Tomb. The guard is not permitted to speak or break his march, unless someone enters the restricted area around the Tomb. If this happens, the guard must come to a halt and bring his rifle (loaded with live ammunition) to port-arms. This is usually enough to make the person move back. (No one has ever gone further than the sharp slap of the rifle in the guard’s hands.)

In June 1946, Congress approved the burial of unknown American from World War II at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Thirteen American unknowns were exhumed from cemeteries in Europe and Africa and shipped to Epinal, France. Maj. Gen. Edward J. O’Neill, U.S. Army, chose one of these caskets on May 12, 1958, as the "trans-Atlantic Candidate unknown." This casket was transported by air to Naples and placed aboard the USS Blandy. Two American unknowns were disinterred from the National Cemetery of the Pacific in Hawaii and four American unknowns disinterred from Fort McKinley American Cemetery in the Philippines. The six unknowns were taken by air to Hickam Air Force Base. On May 16, 1958, Col. Glen Eagleston, U.S. Air Force, selected a "trans-Pacific Candidate unknown," which was placed aboard the USS Canberra. The Blandy and Canberra rendezvoused off Virginia in May 1958, at which time the trans-Pacific Candidate unknown was transferred to the Canberra. Hospitalman First Class William R. Charette, the Navy’s only active enlisted holder of the Medal of Honor, then placed a wreath at the foot of the casket on his right. (The other remains were buried at sea.) This individual became the World War II Unknown.

In August 1956, Congress approved the burial of a Korean War unknown at the Tomb. The remains of four unknown Americans from the Korean conflict were exhumed from the National Cemetery of the Pacific. On May 15, 1958, Master Sergeant Ned Lyle placed a wreath on the fourth casket to choose the Korean War Unknown. (The other three unknowns were reinterred in the National Cemetery of the Pacific.)

Because so much time had passed, the World War II and Korean War unknowns were chosen at the same time. The Unknown of Korea was transported aboard the Canberra at the same time as the "trans-Pacific Candidate unknown."

After the World War II Unknown was chosen, both the WWII and Korean War remains were taken back to the Blandy, which transported them to Washington, D.C. Like the World War I Unknown, they lay in state in the Rotunda of the United States Capitol. Both were interred in vaults on the west side of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier on Memorial Day, May 30, 1958. Rather than enlarge the WWI vault, new vaults were dug in the plaza on the west side of the Tomb.

Congress authorized the entombment of a Vietnam War casualty in 1973. But with advances in identification of remains, no unknown remains could be found. Pressure from Vietnam veterans’ groups was making the issue politically potent by the early 1980s, especially with Republican Ronald Reagan in office as president. And that’s where the scandal began… In May 1972, 24-year-old U.S. Air Force pilot Michael Blassie was shot down in South Vietnam close to the Cambodia border. In October 1972, American ground patrols found Blassie’s identity card, some American money, shreds of a USAF flight suit, and some skeletal remains near where Blassie went down. The I.D. card and money went missing soon thereafter. Pentagon officials declared the remains "likely to be" Blassie’s, but no firm identification was ever made. By 1980, only four sets of Vietnam War-era remains could be declared unidentified, and one of these were the Blassie remains. In 1980, for unknown reasons, an Army review board ruled that the bones were not Blassie’s. Soon thereafter, all documents in the file were removed and destroyed.

On May 8, 1984, the no-longer-"likely" remains were declared "unknown." The Vietnam Unknown was selected by Marine Corps Sgt. Maj. Allan Jay Kellogg, Jr. (a Medal of Honor recipient) at Pearl Harbor on May 17, 1984. The unknown’s remains were transported by the USS Brewton to Alameda Naval Base in California. They arrived on May 23, 1984, and were transported by automobile to nearby Travis Air Force Base on May 24. The remains were transported by air to Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland on May 25, and lay in state in the Capitol Rotunda from May 25 to May 28. They were interred in a new vault in front of the Tomb on May 28, 1984. President Reagan presented the Medal of Honor to the unknown soldier.

The possibility that the remains were Blassie’s was first raised by a man investigating missing-in-action cases. The story broke into the press in January 1998, and in April the two U.S. Senators from Missouri and Blassie’s family were demanding answers. After a high-level Pentagon review, the Secretary of the Army recommended on April 26 that the remains be disinterred. The Secretary of Defense ordered exhumation on May 6, and the remains came above ground on May 13. A DNA sample was obtained from the remains on June 15, and on June 29 the remains were identified as Blassie’s. Blassie was buried in his home town of St. Louis on July 10, 1998, with handfuls of soil from Arlington National Cemetery. The following month, Blassie’s family asked to keep the Medal of Honor, but the Pentagon refused — saying it was intended to go to the unknown, not to Blassie (who had not won it). In June 1999, with no further unidentified Vietnam War remains available, Pentagon officials said they would keep the vault empty. The Vietnam War crypt was rededicated on September 16, 1999.

Interestingly, the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier caused some major changes to D.C. as well as Arlington National Cemetery.

The final piece of "Arlington National Cemetery" as we know it today came with the construction of Arlington Memorial Bridge, Memorial Drive, and the Arlington Memorial Entrance in 1932. The bridge, the drive, and the entrance were designed as a single project and were dedicated on January 16, 1932 by President Herbert Hoover. The U.S. Commission on Fine Arts required that the bridge act as a symbolic link between North and South.

In fact, the famous McMillan Commission (which established the National Mall and set the locations of the Lincoln and Jefferson memorials) had proposed the bridge in 1901, but no action had been taken. When President Harding dedicated the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in 1921, so many people swarmed over Highway Bridge (now the 14th Street Bridges) that it caused a three-hour traffic jam! Harding’s own car had to abandon the roadway and take to the grass shoulder to get to the cemetery on time. Secretary of State Charles Evan Hughes had to walk across the bridge to make it.

The outcry over the feeble, inadequate bridges across the Potomac led to the construction of Arlington Memorial Bridge in 1932!

Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center: Dornier Do 335A-1 Pfeil (Arrow)
Flight to Washington
Image by Chris Devers
Quoting Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Dornier Do 335 A-0 Pfeil (Arrow):

The Do-335 was one of a small group of aircraft marking the pinnacle of international piston-engined development. It was the fastest production piston-engined fighter ever built, attaining 846 kilometers per hour (474 mph) in level flight at a time when the official world speed record was 755 kph (469 mph). Powered by two 1800-hp engines in a unique low-drag configuration and weighing 9600 kg (21,000 lb) loaded, it was an exceptional heavy fighter. This very innovative design also featured an ejection seat, for pilot safety, and a jettisoning fin.

The unconventional layout of the Do-335 — one engine "pulling" in the nose and another "pushing" in the tail – was patented by Claudius Dornier in 1937. The configuration provided the power of two engines, but with reduced drag and better maneuverability. The German Aviation Ministry (RLM) was interested in the design, but initially wanted Dornier only to produce bombers. By 1942, Dornier was still continuing design work and the war situation was worsening. The Luftwaffe now needed a multi-purpose fighter, and the prototype Do-335V-1 ("V" indicating "versuchs" or "experimental") flew in fighter form in September, 1943 – six years after its conception. Orders were immediately placed for 14 prototypes, 10 A-0 preproduction aircraft, 11 production A-1 single-seaters, and 3 A-10 and A-12 two-seat trainers.

The aircraft was quite large for a single-seat fighter, with a cruciform tail and a tricycle landing gear. The two massive liquid-cooled Daimler-Benz DB-603 engines were used in four different versions, each displacing 44.5 liters (2670 cu in) and weighing 910 kg (2006 lb). The engine produced 1750 hp from 12 cylinders in an inverted V layout using fuel injection and an 8.3:1 compression ratio. The rear three-bladed propeller and dorsal fin were jettisoned by explosive bolts in an emergency, to allow the pilot to bail out safely using a pneumatic ejection seat. The seat, inclined 13 degrees to the rear, was ejected with a force of 20 times gravity. The ventral fin could be jettisoned for a belly landing.

Unlike a normal twin-engined aircraft, with wing-mounted engines, loss of an engine on the Do-335 did not cause a handling problem. Even with one engine out, speed was a respectable 621 kph (348 mph). Because of its appearance, pilots dubbed it the "Ant eater" ("Ameisenbar"), although they described its performance as exceptional, particularly in acceleration and turning radius. The Do-335 was very docile in flight and had no dangerous spin characteristics. Many Do-335 prototypes were built, as the Reich strained desperately to provide day and night fighters and fast reconnaissance aircraft to the failing war effort. One of the many RLM production plans, issued in December 1943, called for the production of 310 Do-335s by late 1945. Initial production was at the Dornier Manuel plant, but this factory was bombed heavily in March-April, 1944, and the Do-335 tooling was destroyed.

Ten Do-335A-0 preproduction aircraft were then produced at Dornier’s Oberpfaffenhofen plant in July-October 1944, by which time the Allied bombing campaign was delaying arrivals of engines, propellers, radios, and structural subcomponents. This had a serious effect, because the Do-335 was not a simple aircraft: installation of the electronics alone took 60 hours of assembly, and the electrical parts list was 112 pages long. Production of Daimler-Benz engines, for example, was switched to factories set up in underground salt mines and gypsum mines, but high humidity caused corrosion problems and production dropped 40 percent. Although several preproduction aircraft were issued to combat conversion units some 10 months before the war ended, no Do-335s actually entered combat. Deliveries began to the 1st Experimental Squadron of the Commander-in-Chief of the Luftwaffe ( I/Versuchsverband Ob.d.L.) in late July 1944 for operational trials.

The first of the Do-335A-1 production version left the Dornier line at Friedrichshafen early in 1945, one of only four produced in 1945. It was armed with one 30 mm MK-103 cannon (70 rounds were carried) firing through the propeller hub and two 15 mm MG-151/15 cannon (200 rounds per gun) firing from the top of the forward engine. Even with the fighter situation as desperate as it was, these aircraft were still equipped to carry 500 kg (1100 lb) of bombs internally. Further operational testing, including use of air-to-ground guided missiles, began in Spring 1945 with Trials Unit (Erprobungskommando) 335.

The Do-335A-6 was to be a two-seat night fighter version with the advanced FFO FuG-217J Neptun radar having triple "trident"-like antennas (hence the name "Neptun") on the fuselage and wings, but only a prototype was completed. A total of 37 prototypes, 10 A-0s, 11 A-1s and 2 A-12 trainers were built, although nearly 85 additional aircraft were in assembly when U.S. troops overran the Friedrichshafen factory in late April, 1945. The Vienna-Swechat plant of the Ernst Heinkel AG was also scheduled to build the Do-335 beginning in February, 1945, but production never started.

The NASM aircraft is the second Do-335A-0, designated A-02, with construction number (werke nummer) 240102 and factory registration VG+PH. It was built at Dornier’s Rechlin-Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany, plant on April 16, 1945. It was captured by Allied forces at the plant on April 22, 1945. After checkout, it was flown from a grass runway at Oberweisenfeld, near Munich, to Cherbourg, France. During this flight, the Do-335 easily outclimbed and outdistanced two escorting P-51s, beating them to Cherbourg by 45 minutes. Under the U.S. Army Air Force’s "Project Sea Horse," two Do-335s were shipped to the United States aboard the Royal Navy ship HMS "Reaper" together with other captured German aircraft, for detailed evaluation. This aircraft was assigned to the U.S. Navy, which tested it at the Test and Evaluation Center, Patuxent River Naval Air Station, Maryland. The other aircraft, with registration FE-1012 (later T2-1012), went to the USAAF at Freeman Field, Indiana, where it was tested in early 1946. Its subsequent fate is unknown, and this is the only Do-335 known to exist.

Following Navy flight tests in 1945-48, the aircraft was donated to the Smithsonian’s National Air Museum in 1961 but was stored at NAS Norfolk until 1974. It was then returned to Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany, where the Dornier company restored it to original condition in 1975. The return trip to Germany required an exemption under U.S. laws concerning the export of munitions. The Dornier craftsmen doing the restoration – many of whom had worked on the original aircraft — were astonished to find that the explosive charges fitted to blow off the tail fin and rear propeller in an emergency were still in the aircraft and active, 30 years after their original installation! The Do-335 was put on static display at the May 1-9, 1976, Hannover Airshow, and then loaned to the Deutsches Museum in Munich, where it was on prominent display until returned to Silver Hill, MD, for storage in 1986.

Country of Origin:
Germany

Physical Description:
Twin engine, pusher / puller, fighter / bomber; grey/green, green; late World War II development.

Washington | Posted by Gertrude Brent

Nice Washington Concert photos

July 20th, 2016

A few nice washington concert images I found:

Holiday Orchestra Concert with 5th and 6th Grade Orchestra (Saline, Michigan, December 19, 2013)
washington concert
Image by cseeman
The Holiday Orchestra Concert with 5th and 6th Grade Orchestras directed by Ben Culver. The concert (which was the first one for the 5th Grade Orchestra) featured Les Sharon, David Raft and Laura Washington as narrators. The concert was at the Saline Middle School.

Whitechapel at the 9:30 Club
washington concert
Image by Metal Chris
Whitechapel performing at the 9:30 Club in Washington DC on Monday 15 August 2011 as part of the Summer Slaughter tour.

Music | Posted by Victoria Addington
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